historical fiction

Louis Bayard’s new novel, “Courting Mr. Lincoln,” is an intimately drawn evocation of the love between the brilliant, melancholic future president and the two people who knew him best: his charming confidante Joshua Speed and his spirited future wife, Mary Todd.

Pam Jenoff is the author of several books of historical fiction, including the New York Times bestseller "The Orphan's Tale." Her novels are inspired by her experiences working at the Pentagon and as a diplomat for the State Department handling Holocaust issues in Poland.

Her new book, "The Lost Girls of Paris,"shines a light on the incredible heroics of a network of female secret agents in World War II and weaves a mesmerizing tale of courage, sisterhood and the great strength of women to survive in the hardest of circumstances.

Guided by the 3,000 letters between the prominent journalist, Lorena Hickok, and one of the world’s most admired women, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Bloom’s novel “White Houses” explores Eleanor’s real-life romantic relationship with Lorena.

As host of “The Lead” and “State of the Union” on CNN, Jake Tapper spends his days bringing attention to some of the biggest political headlines.

Tapper has now brought Washington intrigue and the “swampiness” on this city to his first novel. “The Hellfire Club,” is a political thriller that takes place during the days when Senator Joe McCarthy was carrying out his Communist “witch hunt.”

It's been more than two decades since award-winning author Charles Frazier had wild success with his debut novel, "Cold Mountain."

Frazier’s 4th novel, "Varina," returns to that era with the story of Varina Howell - the second wife of Jefferson Davis.

This is an Off The Shelf edition of The Book Show, presented by Northshire Bookstore and taped live in front of an audience.

Sebastian Barry is one of the most prominent Irish writers of his generation. In his latest novel, Days without End, he explores America through the eyes of a young Irish immigrant fighting in the great wars of the mid-19th century.

It’s about war, immigration, and the violent making of America, but also a moving love story between two gay men. 

In 1989, Ken Follett published the historical epic The Pillars of the Earth, a departure for the bestselling writer which was praised for its ambitious scope and unforgettable cast of characters. It reached #1 on bestseller lists around the world, and has since become Follett’s most popular novel.

Ten years ago, Oprah selected The Pillars of the Earth for her Book Club, and Follett published the second book in the Kingsbridge series, World Without End.  The two books in the series have sold 38 million copies.

The saga now continues with Follett’s new epic, A Column Of Fire, coming tomorrow, which will introduce readers to a world of spies and secret agents in the sixteenth century, the time of Queen Elizabeth I. 

A Column Of Fire begins in 1558 where the ancient stones of Kingsbridge Cathedral look down on a city torn apart by religious conflict. As power in England shifts precariously between Catholics and Protestants, high principles clash bloodily with friendship, loyalty, and love. We can read the book tomorrow – we talk with best-selling author Ken Follett this morning.