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All Things Considered

Weekdays, 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.; Weekends, 5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
  • Hosted by Weekdays, Ari Shapiro, Mary Louise Kelly, Audie Cornish & Ailsa Chang; Weekends, Michel Martin

All Things Considered is an NPR radio newsmagazine that delivers in-depth reporting and transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. The program presents breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features.

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We've talked about whether so-called vaccine passports are legal and whether they might be necessary for travel. Now we want to ask whether bringing them into widespread use is the right thing to do. Yasmeen Serhan is worried about this. She wrote a piece for The Atlantic titled "The Futility Of Vaccine Passports." In it, she argues that vaccine passports could divide society into two groups, the jabbed and the jab-less. And Yasmeen Serhan is with us now from London.

Welcome. Thanks so much for joining us.

YASMEEN SERHAN: Thanks for having me.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We've talked about whether so-called vaccine passports are legal and whether they might be necessary for travel. Now we want to ask whether bringing them into widespread use is the right thing to do. Yasmeen Serhan is worried about this. She wrote a piece for The Atlantic titled "The Futility Of Vaccine Passports." In it, she argues that vaccine passports could divide society into two groups, the jabbed and the jab-less. And Yasmeen Serhan is with us now from London.

Welcome. Thanks so much for joining us.

YASMEEN SERHAN: Thanks for having me.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We've talked about whether so-called vaccine passports are legal and whether they might be necessary for travel. Now we want to ask whether bringing them into widespread use is the right thing to do. Yasmeen Serhan is worried about this. She wrote a piece for The Atlantic titled "The Futility Of Vaccine Passports." In it, she argues that vaccine passports could divide society into two groups, the jabbed and the jab-less. And Yasmeen Serhan is with us now from London.

Welcome. Thanks so much for joining us.

YASMEEN SERHAN: Thanks for having me.

Vermont plans to expand options for summer programs for kids using federal COVID-19 relief funding following a tough school year amid the pandemic.

Vermont Governor Phil Scott
Pat Bradley/WAMC

Vermont’s governor is outlining how he would like the state to use the money it will receive from the American Rescue Plan.

Vermont Senate Chamber
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The Vermont Senate has given its final approval to a proposal that would amend the state constitution to protect a woman's right to an abortion.

SUNY Plattsburgh sign
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The State University of New York at Plattsburgh is planning a series of small in-person graduation ceremonies for the Class of 2021.

Customs and Border Protection checkpoint in Vermont on May 4, 2019
Migrant Justice

A federal judge has declined to dismiss a lawsuit challenging the use of checkpoints by the U.S. Border Patrol within 100 miles from the Canadian border.

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Burlington International Airport sign
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The Burlington International Airport will soon be offering direct flights to and from Boston after nearly a decade without them.

Amtrak train (file)
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Vermont is preparing to welcome the return of Amtrak passenger rail service and inter-city bus services.

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with sex therapist Dr. Bat Sheva Marcus about her upbringing, career, and advice from her new book Sex Points.

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Just two months ago, airlines were warning about furloughing thousands of pilots. Now they're putting up help-wanted signs. As NPR's David Schaper reports, that's because air travel seems to be recovering more quickly than expected.

A year ago, when people were losing jobs left and right, millions called their local unemployment agency. Like many states, Texas struggled to deal with the volume of people applying for unemployment — which meant busy signals and long hold times. When you're dealing with the soul-crushing inefficiency of a government bureaucracy pushed beyond its purposely limited limits, sometimes you have to make the best of it.

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Picture of a marijuana plant
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Wikimedia Commons Public Domain

Residents in another town in Vermont have voted to approve the sale of recreational marijuana, after delaying the vote for a month to allow more people to be vaccinated against COVID-19.

Vermont State Police patch on the Williston barracks sign
Pat Bradley/WAMC

A Vermont State Trooper must appear in court to answer charges in a use-of force incident.

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More than 550,000 people in the U.S. have died from COVID-19. We're going to take a moment now to revisit the life of one of those people. We first brought you his story late last year.

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For nearly four decades, Martha Lou Gadsden served her brand of Southern soul food from a converted gas station in Charleston, S.C. She died last Thursday at the age of 91.

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