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Open seats produce competition in elections for the Massachusetts legislature

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More than half of state lawmakers face no primary or general election opponent on the ballot this year despite the redistricting that occurred as a result of the 2020 Census.

Most Springfield-area incumbents are unopposed for new terms in office

With the passing of a deadline this week for candidates to turn in nomination papers to be on the ballot to run for Massachusetts House and Senate seats, election contests are coming into sharper focus.

More than half the current members of the legislature will face no challenger this year, according to the Secretary of the Commonwealth’s office.

Most contests are in districts where sitting legislators have decided to run for another office or retire. That is the case in greater Springfield where there are open races in one Senate district and for two House seats.

WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill discussed the contests with Matt Szafranski, Editor-in-Chief of Western Mass Politics & Insight.

Paul Tuthill is WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief. He’s been covering news, everything from politics and government corruption to natural disasters and the arts, in western Massachusetts since 2007. Before joining WAMC, Paul was a reporter and anchor at WRKO in Boston. He was news director for more than a decade at WTAG in Worcester. Paul has won more than two dozen Associated Press Broadcast Awards. He won an Edward R. Murrow award for reporting on veterans’ healthcare for WAMC in 2011. Born and raised in western New York, Paul did his first radio reporting while he was a student at the University of Rochester.