Gloversville Mayor Pleads Guilty To Misdemeanor, Resigns

Jan 9, 2019

The Mayor of Gloversville, New York has submitted his resignation after pleading guilty to misdemeanor official misconduct.

Third-term Republican Dayton King submitted his letter of resignation Wednesday morning effective 5 p.m. after admitting he used the city’s postage meter for personal use.

Saratoga County District Attorney Karen Heggen acted as special prosecutor in the case.

“In open court today, he admitted before the judge and all present in the courtroom that he, in fact, had violated the laws of the state of New York and that he had done so in part by exercising conduct in regards to his official capacity as the mayor,” said Heggen.

In addition to resigning, King must pay more than $470 in restitution. He was also ordered to pay surcharges and fines totaling more than $700, and must complete 50 hours of community service.

Again, D.A. Heggen.

“This wasn’t just someone taking or stealing something of value. It also involved him abusing his discretion as an elected official. And for that, and because of that, as prosecutor, I believe the interests of justice were served by him admitting that in his plea of guilty today to the misdemeanor of official misconduct,” said Heggen.

King apologized in a statement, which reads in part:

“I used poor judgment. I was wrong, and I am embarrassed by my conduct. I apologize to everyone who I have let down and I ask for your forgiveness.  I realize my actions have disappointed people that I care deeply about. I will work hard to regain the trust of the public.”

King became mayor in 2010 and held onto the office in his most recent election on a recount.

It wasn’t his first brush with the law.

In September, King paid a $250 fine after being charged with a violation of second-degree harassment. The complaint filed by King’s former mayoral challenger, Bill Rowback, came after King announced during a televised debate that he had viewed Rowback’s personnel file.

Rowback is employed as a Gloversville firefighter. In October, King apologized to Rowback during a common council meeting.

It’s now up to the Gloversville Common Council to appoint an interim mayor. Councilor-at-large Vincent DeSantis says one will be chosen prior to Thursday’s organizational meeting.

‘The charter says that the council has to appoint one of its members for that vacancy if the mayor’s position is vacant for any reason,” said DeSantis.

A member of the community could then also be chosen to fill the vacancy left on the city council.

DeSantis said the legal issues surrounding King put the city in a difficult position.

“I think there’s a feeling of relief and a feeling that now we can put things back in order and proceed with all of the positive things that we are doing for Gloversville. Because we do have so many positive initiatives that are in the works,” said DeSantis.

The Common Council’s 2019 organizational meeting is scheduled for Thursday at 6 p.m.