Ridley Scott

In 1991, Thelma & Louise, the story of two outlaw women on the run from their disenchanted lives, was a revelation. Finally, here was a film in which women were, in every sense, behind the wheel. It turned the tables on Hollywood, instantly becoming a classic.

Becky Aikman’s new book "Off the Cliff: How the Making of Thelma & Louise Drove Hollywood to the Edge," offers a rousing behind-the-scenes look at the filmmaking process as well as the vivid personalities behind the creation of a cinematic masterpiece.

Becky Aikman is the author of the memoir "Saturday Night Widows: The Adventures of Six Friends Remaking Their Lives." She was a journalist at Newsday, and her work has also appeared in the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times.

Back in the early 1950s, 3-D was a gimmick employed by Hollywood to lure back into theaters patrons who were abandoning moviegoing in favor of sitting at home in their easy chairs and staring at what then was new and novel: their just-purchased television sets. And these days, in case you haven’t noticed, there has been a resurgence of 3-D in movie theaters.