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51% Show #1252

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When President Bill Clinton announced he'd stopped eating meat and dairy on the advice of his doctors, it seemed to tip the scales of public opinion, shifting veganism from an earthy crunchy fringe idea to one that deserved serious consideration.  Ten years ago, an upstate New York farm animal sanctuary opened its doors, at first focusing on saving horses and cows from abusive situations. Catskill Farm Animal Sanctuary now is home to animals of all kinds, but has expanded into educational programs including a vegan cooking curriculum and a summer camp for kids that encourages campers to adopt a vegan lifestyle.  Founder Kathy Stevens, who latest book, Animal Camp, celebrates the animals she's known at the sanctuary, said the public's become far more receptive to the idea of a plant based diet.

Up next, an international high fashion model who's using her fame to push for diversity, fair wages, safe working conditions and an end to the use of underage models.  

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  Our next activist is a fashion model working to change the industry from the inside.  Yomi Abiola is among modeling's elite - the first African face for Maybelline cosmetics, appearing in Harper's Bazaar, Vogue and Elle magazines.  She's also the founder of STUFF – Stand Up for Fashion – and Associate to the UNESCO Chair for Human Rights.  On this week's edition of Alive and Kicking, Dr. Sharon Ufberg speaks with Abiola about STUFF – and why the fashion industry can lead the way in issues like fair pay, safe workplaces, sustainability, diversity and women's health and self-esteem.

Dr. Sharon Ufberg is an integrative health care practitioner and health journalist in the San Francisco area.

Finally, Gilles Malkine is back with a woman who made 

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  recent history.  She first hit the spotlight because of the man she married, but she became a global icon because of her commitment to ending poverty, AIDS, and as an outspoken advocate of the movement to ban land mines. Her name was Diana Spencer.

Gilles Malkine is a writer, actor and musician.  He lives in New York's Catskill Mountains.

The work to remove land mines continues to be an issue in nearly sixty countries – as we hear in this report from UN Radio.

That’s our show for this week. Thanks to Katie Britton for production assistance.  Our theme  music is by Kevin Bartlett. This show is a national production of Northeast Public Radio.  Our executive producer is Dr. Alan Chartock.

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