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Book cover for "A World Without Email"
Portfolio

Dubbed “the Marie Kondo of technology,” Georgetown professor Cal Newport, has dedicated his career to helping people develop healthier, more balanced relationships with modern technology. Now, he turns his attention to our inboxes.

Email has long been heralded as having rescued modern work life from the inefficiencies of memo pads and fax machines. But Newport argues that email has actually created a productivity disaster, reducing profitability and perhaps even slowing overall economic growth.

In "A World Without Email: Reimagining Work in a World of Communication Overload," Newport makes the case that our inbox-driven approach to work is broken, and offers a vision for liberating workers from the tyranny of constant communication.

Book cover for "The Good Hand"
Penguin/Random House

  Like thousands of restless men left unmoored in the wake of the 2008 economic crash, Michael Patrick Smith arrived in the fracking boomtown of Williston, North Dakota five years later homeless, unemployed, and desperate for a job. Renting a mattress on a dirty flophouse floor, he slept boot to beard with migrant men who came from all across America and as far away as Jamaica, Africa and the Philippines. They ate together, drank together, argued like crows and searched for jobs they couldn’t get back home. Smith’s goal was to find the hardest work he could do – to find out if he could do it.

His book this time in his life is "The Good Hand: A Memoir of Work, Brotherhood, and Transformation in an American Boomtown."

Book cover for "Monopolies Suck"
Simon & Schuster / Simon & Schuster

Something’s not right. No matter how hard you work, life seems to only get harder. In the new book, "Monopolies Suck," antitrust expert and director at the Open Markets Institute, Sally Hubbard, shows us the sways big corporations rule our lives—and what must be done to stop them.

Hubbard says the U.S. failed to protect its citizens against COVID-19, and corporate mergers led to a shortage of ventilators and critical medical supplies, while hospital monopolies underpaid vital health care workers. Small businesses are shuttering without government support, while the most powerful companies profiteer.

Hubbard says the economy is not working for the middle class, and monopolies are amplifying the systemic racism and misogyny that instigated a summer of protests and unrest.

How do you do great work while sitting near the same spot where you watch Netflix? How can you be responsive without losing the focus necessary for getting things done? How can you maintain and grow your network when you spend less time face to face?

Long before the pandemic and public health concerns pushed many of us indoors, some of the most successful people fueled their careers with carefully perfected work-from-home routines.

Laura Vanderkam's new e-book is "The New Corner Office: How the Most Successful People Work from Home."

Vanderkam is the author of several time management and productivity books, including "Juliet’s School of Possibilities," "Off the Clock," "I Know How She Does It," "What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfast," and "168 Hours." Her work has appeared in publications including the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, and Fortune. She is the host of the podcast "The New Corner Office" and "Before Breakfast" and the co-host, with Sarah Hart-Unger, of the podcast "Best of Both Worlds."

Lengthening hours, lessening pay, no parental leave, scant job security: never have so many workers needed so much support. Yet, the very labor unions that could garner protections and help workers speak up for themselves are growing weaker every day and an age of rampant inequality of increasing social protests and strikes.

When a majority of workers say they want to be union members, why does the union density continue to decline? Shaun Richman offers some answers in his new book, "Tell the Bosses We're Coming: A New Action Plan for Workers in the 21st Century."

Shaun Richman has spent a decade and a half as a union organizer and representative.

The Hart Cluett Museum’s ‘The Way We Work(ed)’ exhibit, will open to the public tomorrow at 5:00 p.m.The exhibit was organized by The Hart Cluett Museum in collaboration with the Smithsonian as part of a pilot project to develop a unique humanities-based exhibition about local work history. The museum is one of just 10 museums in the United States chosen through a competitive selection process.

The exhibit is divided into four sections: “Where We Work,” “How We Work,” “Who Works?” and “Why We Work.” An advisory panel consisting of more than two dozen area professionals from widely different facets of the region’s workplaces was assembled to provide a contemporary perspective on the ever-changing nature of work. The panel included experts from backgrounds in technology, construction, agriculture, education and workforce development, among others.

Stacy Pomeroy Draper, the Curator of the Hart Cluett Museum joins us this morning.

From the bestselling author of “A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius,” “The Circle,” “A Hologram for the King,” and “What Is the What” comes a taut, suspenseful story of two visitors’ role in a nation’s fragile peace. Dave Eggers’ latest is “The Parade: A Novel.”

Earl Dotter

Renowned labor photojournalist, Earl Dotter, has photographed workers in various occupations for the last 50 years. His photos capture the humanity and nature of work in the US. He has documented the lives of coal mine workers in Appalachia, farmworkers, fishermen, nurses, 9-11 rescue workers, and some of the major events of the labor movement in U.S. history.

The exhibit "Life's Work: A Fifty Year Photographic Chronicle of Working in the U.S.A." will be shown at the LOB Concourse Level in the Legislative Office Building in Albany, New York from April 22 through the 26. 

We are joined by Earl Dotter, Northeast NY Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health Director, Matt London, and Outreach and Education Coordinator Rossana Coto-Batres. 

Former White House social secretaries Lea Berman, who worked for George and Laura Bush, and Jeremy Bernard, who worked for Michelle and Barack Obama, have collaborated on the book "Treating People Well: The Extraordinary Power of Civility at Work and in Life."

Their daily experiences at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue taught them valuable lessons about how to work productively with people from different walks of life and points of view. These Washington insiders share what they’ve learned through first person examples of their own glamorous (and sometimes harrowing) moments with celebrities, foreign leaders and that most unpredictable of animals - the American politician.

Our attention has never been as overwhelmed or in demand as it is today. We've grown uncomfortable with boredom and the lack of stimulation or distraction, and instead try to cram as much into every moment of our life as we can. Many of us know our brains are unable to multitask, but feel compelled to do it anyway, in the process sacrificing our happiness, productivity, and even our creativity.

Productivity expert Chris Bailey looks to help with a simple and practical model he outlines in "Hyperfocus: How to Be More Productive in a World of Distraction."

Allen Gannett is the founder and CEO of TrackMaven, a software analytics firm whose clients have included Microsoft, Marriott, Saks Fifth Avenue, Home Depot, Aetna, Honda, and GE. He has been on the “30 Under 30” lists for both Inc. and Forbes.

In his book, "The Creative Curve," he overturns the mythology around creative genius, and reveals the science and secrets behind achieving breakout commercial success in any field.

We have been spoon-fed the notion that creativity is the province of genius; of those favored, brilliant few whose moments of insight arrive in unpredictable flashes of divine inspiration. And if we are not a genius, we might as well pack it in and give up. Either we have that gift, or we don’t. But Allen says that isn’t true.

Recent research has shown that there is a predictable science behind achieving commercial success in any creative endeavor, from writing a popular novel to starting up a successful company to creating an effective marketing campaign.

Families today are squeezed on every side from high childcare costs and harsh employment policies to workplaces without paid family leave or even dependable and regular working hours. Many realize that attaining the standard of living their parents managed has become impossible.

In her book, "Squeezed: Why Our Families Can't Afford America," Alissa Quart, executive editor of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project, examines the lives of many middle-class Americans who can now barely afford to raise children. She shows how our country has failed its families. Her subjects, from professors to lawyers to caregivers to nurses, have been wrung out by a system that doesn’t support them, and enriches only a tiny elite.

Leadership expert Sally Helgesen and bestselling leadership coach Marshall Goldsmith have trained thousands of high achievers to reach even greater heights. Again and again, they see that women face specific and different roadblocks from men as they advance in the workplace. In fact, the very habits that helped women early in their careers can hinder them as they move up. Simply put, what got you here won't get you there, and you might not even realize your blind spots until it's too late.

Their new book: "How Women Rise: Break the 12 Habits Holding You Back from Your Next Raise, Promotion, or Job" is essential reading for any woman who is ready to advance to the next level.

This afternoon there is a Saratoga County Chamber of Commerce Event with Sally Helgesen at Embassy Suites Saratoga at 4 p.m. co-hosted by Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga.

Janice Kaplan has enjoyed wide success as a magazine editor, television producer, writer, and journalist. The former editor-in-chief of Parade magazine, she is the author of thirteen popular books including the New York Times bestseller "The Gratitude Diaries."

She and Dr. Barnaby Marsh (an expert on risk taking) have written the new book "How Luck Happens: Using the Science of Luck to Transform Work, Love, and Life."

Using original research, fascinating studies, and engaging interviews, Kaplan and Marsh reveal the simple techniques to create luck in love and marriage, business and career, and health, happiness, and family relationships.

Capitalism has been a fundamental part of the American story from the very beginning, when the country became a place for people to dream, invent, and bet the farm in pursuit of a better life.

In the new book, Americana, author Bhu Srinivasan explores four hundred years of the American spirit of innovation and ambition through a series of Next Big Things—the inventions, techniques, and industries that drove American history forward—from the telegraph, the railroad, guns, and radio to banking, flight, suburbia, and cellphones.

Bhu Srinivasan is a media entrepreneur whose career has spanned digital media, pop culture, technology, publishing, and financial content. 

In How May I Help You?: An Immigrant's Journey from MBA to Minimum Wage, Deepak Singh chronicles his downward mobility as an immigrant to a small town in Virginia. Armed with an MBA from India, Singh can get only a minimum-wage job in an electronics store. Every day he confronts unfamiliar American mores, from strange idioms to deeply entrenched racism.

Hidden anger that comes out indirectly can undermine relationships between friends, family, and colleagues. When people feel compelled to conceal their true beliefs and emotions, there can be serious physical and psychological results for everyone involved.

In Overcoming Passive-Aggression, Revised Edition: How to Stop Hidden Anger from Spoiling Your Relationships, Career, and Happiness, Dr. Tim Murphy and Loriann Oberlin offer a clear definition of passive aggression and show readers not only how to end the behavior but also how to avoid falling victim to other people's hidden anger.

Weren’t women supposed to have “arrived”? Perhaps with the nation’s first female President, equal pay on the horizon, true diversity in the workplace to come thereafter? Or, at least the end of “fat-shaming” and “locker room talk”? 

Well, we aren’t quite there yet. But does that mean that progress for women in business has come to a screeching halt?  It’s true that the old rules didn’t get us as far as we hoped. But we can go the distance, and we can close the gaps that still exist. We just need a new way.

In fact, there are many reasons to be optimistic about the future, says former Wall Street powerhouse-turned-entrepreneur Sallie Krawcheck.  That’s because the business world is changing fast –driven largely by technology - and it’s changing in ways that give women more power and opportunities than ever.

Her new book is - Own It: The Power of Women at Work

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Malissa Pilette-McClenon - Director of Development and Marketing - YWCA of the Greater Capital Region to discuss the Jamison-Rounds Ready for Work Program – designed to help underprivileged women find and keep employment and/or pursue education. 

Life is boring: filled with meetings and traffic, errands and emails. Nothing we'd ever call fun. But what if we've gotten fun wrong?

In Play Anything, visionary game designer and philosopher Ian Bogost shows how we can overcome our daily anxiety; transforming the boring, ordinary world around us into one of endless, playful possibilities.

  Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation. Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Our Ability Alliance dual goals are to inspire those individuals with disabilities to achieve their dreams through education and employment as well as to educate able-bodied individuals about the differences in ability around us. The group’s mission is to build a coalition among businesses in New York State interested in both hiring - and building supplier diversity of businesses owned by - individuals with disabilities.

This morning, we welcome John Robinson, Executive Director of Our Ability Alliance.

In New Aging: Live Smarter Now to Live Better Forever Matthias Hollwich has laid out his work on aging and architecture into a collection of short, digestible passages that will inspire us to think creatively and realistically about how we want to spend the rest of our lives.

His advice ranges from practical design tips for making our homes safer and more comfortable to thought-provoking insights on how we work, relax, travel, socialize, and even how we eat. Most importantly, Matthias wants us to make small, simple changes in our 40s, so we won’t be forced to make large ones in our 70s.

James Green is a celebrated labor historian and author of the book Death in the Haymarket. His new book is The Devil is Here in These Hills, a chronicle of West Virginia’s coal miners and their fight for unionization and civil rights. The book is particularly relevant today as the arduous battle for the rights of West Virginia miners rages on. 

  Perhaps no profession is so constantly discussed, regulated, and maligned by non-practitioners as teaching. The voices of the teachers themselves are conspicuously missing.

Defying this trend, teacher and writer Garret Keizer takes us to school in his book, Getting Schooled: The Reeducation of an American Teacher, an arresting account of his return to the same rural Vermont high school where he taught fourteen years ago.

8/29/14 Panel

Aug 29, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao, and political consultant Libby Post.

Topics include:
Ukraine Update
President Obama on Syria
Hackers, Russian and otherwise
24/7 Email

   We are very happy to continue our new regular feature on the RT, entitled – Ides Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

This morning we spotlight Connecticut at Work. The yearlong programming initiative explore a changing workplace, changing culture of work, changing workforce.

Stuart Parnes – Executive Director of The Connecticut Humanities Council joins us this morning.

Retirement on the Line

Apr 24, 2012

We welcome Caitrin Lynch and speak with her about her book, Retirement on the Line: Age, Work, and Value in an American Factory .