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woman

Book cover for "The Girl from the Channel Islands"
Harper Collins

Inspired by true events, "The Girl from the Channel Islands" by Jenny Lecoat tells the riveting story of a young Jewish woman trapped on the occupied island of Jersey during World War II.

In June 1940, the Channel Islands are occupied by Hitler’s forces. Hedy Bercu is a young Jewish woman who fled from Vienna to escape the Anschluss. She finds herself once more trapped by the Nazis, on the tiny island of Jersey. Concealing her racial status, Hedy finds work with the German authorities as a translator and embarks on acts of resistance.

Patrick Radden Keefe, a staff writer for the New Yorker, is the author the best-selling: “Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland.” In it, Keefe looks at the disappearance of Jean McConville, a widowed young mother of ten children and explores the broader context of the terrorism and counterterrorism campaigns in Northern Ireland over the course of the Troubles, and what happened to the perpetrators and the victims of this crime.

Born in 1819, Clara Schumann was a composer and piano teacher - regarded as one of the most distinguished pianists of the Romantic era.

This weekend The Albany Symphony will celebrate her life and music in The Clara Schumann Festival.

Musicians from the Graduate Program at Bard College Conservatory will perform vocal and instrumental chamber works on Saturday, January 11 at 3 p.m. and Sunday, January 12 at 11 a.m.

Then, on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m., The Albany Symphony will present works by Clara Schumann, Robert Schumann, Johannes Brahms, and a World Premiere by Loren Loiacono. The orchestra will be joined by pianist Harmony Zhu.

These concerts will take place at The Troy Savings Bank Music Hall in Troy, New York and we are joined by Harmony Zhu, Loren Loiacono, and Albany Symphony Music Director and Conductor, David Alan Miller.  

Janis Joplin has passed into legend as a brash, impassioned soul doomed by the pain that produced one of the most extraordinary voices in rock history. But in her new biography, “Janis: Her Life and Music,” Holly George-Warren provides a deep portrait of a woman who wasn’t all about suffering.

As a teenager, Mallory O’Meara was thrilled to discover that one of her favorite movies, "Creature from the Black Lagoon," featured a monster designed by a woman, Milicent Patrick. But for someone who should have been hailed as a pioneer in the genre, there was little information available. For, as O’Meara soon discovered, Patrick’s contribution had been claimed by a jealous male colleague, her career had been cut short and she soon after had disappeared from film history. No one even knew if she was still alive. As a young woman working in the horror film industry, O’Meara set out to right the wrong, and in the process discovered the full, fascinating story of an ambitious, artistic woman ahead of her time.

Mallory O'Meara's book is "The Lady from the Black Lagoon: Hollywood Monsters and the Lost Legacy of Milicent Patrick."

Listener Essay - Pumping Gas

Feb 19, 2019
Bama - a yellow lab
Bob Slack

 

  Debbie Slack was honored to be a recipient of the 2018 Edwin Way Teale Artist in Residence at Trail Wood sponsored by the Connecticut Audubon Society.

Inspired by the residency, Debbie has been writing a series of essays which has expanded into a memoir titled "Trail Wood: A Love Story." Debbie is also focused on publishing her novel, "Margaret Mary and the Gutsy Girls." She is excited for their story to leave the comforts of home and venture out into the hearts of girls everywhere. Outside of writing, Debbie enjoys exploring nature with her husband, Bob, and their two Labradors.

~Pumping Gas~

It was just a typical day and I assumed an ordinary moment, when I drove into the gas station with my son’s Yellow Labrador Retriever watching me from the backseat. While my son’s deployed we’ve been taking care of Bama, a gentle giant, who croons like a hound dog and acts all innocent when the bread goes missing even though his snoot is peppered in crumbs. When Bama’s allergies flare-up, he scratches, loses hair, and turns pink. So this morning when he was looking less a dog and more like a pig, I called the vet’s office. They insisted I bring him right in. It’s a thirty-minute drive one-way and by the time we arrived, the office was overwhelmed with an emergency and needed to reschedule. I understood, but the trip was about to waste an hour of my time and all of my gas.

Linda Ellerbee in studio at WAMC
Patrick Garrett

Linda Ellerbee is a Peabody and Emmy Award winning journalist who was one of the first women to anchor the national news. Her work at NBC was groundbreaking, followed by her bestselling books, and her important presence for a quarter of a century explaining the news to young people on Nick News.

Colson Whitehead’s novel "The Underground Railroad," tells the story of a runaway slave and re-imagines the pre-Civil War South. It won the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book award and Whitehead was recently named The New York State Writer - one of the biggest prizes in literature.

Rachel Kadish’s new novel The Weight of Ink is set in London. It is the interwoven tale of two women of remarkable intellect – one an emigrant from Amsterdam who is permitted to scribe for a blind rabbi, just before the plague hits the city; the other an ailing historian with a love of Jewish history.

Rachel Simmons is the author of "Enough As She Is: How to Help Girls Move Beyond Impossible Standards of Success to Live Healthy, Happy and Fulfilling Lives," and the New York Times bestsellers "Odd Girl Out and "The Curse of the Good Girl."

As an educator, Rachel teaches girls and women skills to build their resilience, amplify their voices, and own their courage so that they live with integrity and health.

Using a trove of footage unearthed from the National Geographic archives, the new documentary film "Jane" tells the true story of Jane Goodall as a young woman whose chimpanzee research challenged the male-dominated scientific consensus of her time and revolutionized our understanding of the natural world.

Filmmaker Brett Morgen joins us. Dubbed the “mad scientist” of documentary film by the New York Times, Brett Morgen has been directing, writing, and producing ground breaking documentary films for the past 15 years.

This Women’s History Month, as we witness the huge volume of female candidates running in 2018, the hundreds of thousands marching at the Women’s Marches across the country, we focus on the women who demanded and fought damn hard for their rights.

Journalist Elaine Weiss’ The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote rediscovers the powerful and inspiring story of American women rising up to claim their rights, as their long fight for the vote reaches its climax. 

“Manhattan Beach” is the latest from Pulitzer-Prize winning novelist Jennifer Egan. It is a haunting and propulsive WWII-era novel that tells the intertwined stories of Anna Kerrigan, a Brooklyn Navy Yard diver, her father Eddie Kerrigan, a longshoreman turned small-time gangster, and Eddie’s connected boss, Dexter Styles.

The all female singer-songwriter tour, Steady On: Celebrating Lilith Fair at 20 will come to The Linda - WAMC’s Performing Arts Studio on Saturday at 8pm.

Sharon Goldman, Lara Herscovitch, Amy Soucy, and Sloan Wainwright will play songs made famous at Lilith Fair in the late 90s along with their own music. Sharon Goldman and Sloan Wainwright join us.

Alice Guy-Blaché was the first female film director and the first film studio owner. She made her first film, by her own account, in 1896 at age 23. She went on to write, direct, or produce more than 1,000 films.

Upstate Women in Film and Television (UPWIFT) will present a selection of films by Alice Guy-Blaché at the Rosendale Theater in Rosendale, NY on Wednesday, November 30th; at The Linda in Albany, NY on Friday, December 2nd; and at Upstate Films in Rhinebeck on Sunday, December 11th.

Part of the presentations will be a Skype Q&A with producer and director Pamela Green, who is currently making a feature full-length documentary film about Alice Guy-Blaché for which she has been conducting extensive research for the past five years.

Pamela Green joins us now along with Hanna Sawka, President of UPWIFT.


  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their conversation about female composers - focusing on Maria Agata Szymanowska.

Yehuda’s Close Encounter with Music series begins their new season on October 15th with the Chamber Orchestra Kremlin in a program of Haydn, Tchaikovsky, and Shostakovich.

  Novelist and Williams College Professor Alison Case joins us this morning to discuss her reimagining of Wuthering Heights. The new book is Nelly Dean: A Return to Wuthering Heights - a gripping and heartbreaking novel that re-imagines life at Wuthering Heights through the eyes of the Earnshaws’ loyal servant, Nelly Dean.

Nelly Dean is an inspired accompaniment to Emily Bronte’s adored work. It is the story of a woman who is fated to bear the pain of a family she is unable to leave, and unable to save.

    

  In her latest novel, After Birth, Elisa Albert writes about motherhood and friendship. The book tells the story of Ari who lives in a town in upstate New York and is supposed to be working on a Ph.D. in women’s studies but she has major postpartum depression.

The book issues a wake-up call to a culture that turns its new mothers into exiles and expects them to act like natives.

  On June 23, 2008, President George W. Bush nominated Ann Dunwoody as a four-star general in the US Army—the first time a woman had ever achieved that rank. The news generated excitement around the world.

Now retired after nearly four decades in the Army, General Ann Dunwoody shares what she learned along the way in her book, A Higher Standard: Leadership Strategies from America's First Female Four-Star General.

  

  Gail Sheehy, the author of Passages, a book that changed millions of lives, now lays bare her own life passages in a memoir that reveals her harrowing and ultimately triumphant path from groundbreaking 1960s "girl" journalist to bestselling author who made a career of excavating cultural taboos - from sex, menopause, and midlife crisis to illness, caregiving, and death.

  Emily Arnold McCully will be reading from her new biography, Ida M. Tarbell: The Woman Who Challenged Big Business – and Won!, at the Chatham Bookstore on Sunday from 2-4.

Born in 1857, Tarbell was one of America’s first investigative journalists, “a fascinating and complex person: quirky, opinionated, reserved, adventurous, independent – a woman proving herself in a man’s world.

Emily Arnold McCully received the Caldecott Medal for Mirette on the High Wire. The illustrator of more than 40 books for young readers, she has a lifelong interest in history and feminist issues and she joins us this morning.

    When journalist Becky Aikman was widowed in her 40s, she felt unmoored. But she couldn’t find the kind of help that she needed, so she dug into the data and eventually created her own unique support system.

Her book, Saturday Night Widows: The Adventures of Six Friends Remaking Their Lives, details the trials and triumphs following tragedy — and new research about what really helps the bereaved.

"Flora" by Gail Godwin

May 8, 2013

    Ten-year-old Helen and her summer guardian, Flora, are isolated together in Helen's decaying family house while her father is doing secret war work in Oak Ridge during the final months of World War II. At three Helen lost her mother and the beloved grandmother who raised her has just died.A fiercely imaginative child, Helen is desperate to keep her house intact with all its ghosts and stories. Flora, her late mother's twenty-two-year old first cousin, who cries at the drop of a hat, is ardently determined to do her best for Helen. Their relationship and its fallout, played against a backdrop of a lost America will haunt Helen for the rest of her life.

    In 1954, in a remote mountain village in South America, a little girl was abducted. She was four years old. Marina Chapman was stolen from her housing estate and then abandoned deep in the Colombian jungle. That she survived is a miracle. Two days later, half-drugged, terrified, and starving, she came upon a troop of capuchin monkeys. Acting entirely on instinct, she tried to do what they did: she ate what they ate and copied their actions, and little by little, learned to fend for herself.

    Born in Benin, Angélique Kidjo is a Grammy award-winning music recording artist deemed "Africa's premier diva" by Time and is the continent's most internationally celebrated female musical exponent.

The BBC has included Angélique Kidjo in its list of the "African continent's 50 most iconic figures". The Guardian has listed her as one of their "Top 100 Most Inspiring Women in the World" and Angelique is the first woman to be listed among "The 40 Most Powerful Celebrities In Africa" by Forbes Magazine.

Known for her dynamic and uplifting music, she has translated her distinctive work in the arts to that of philanthropy; by promoting education for girls in Africa through her foundation, Batonga and as a UNICEF Goodwill ambassador.

Angélique Kidjo will perform at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, MA this Saturday, Feb. 23rd at 8pm.

Mitt Romney's wife says her husband is thinking about picking a woman to be on his ticket this fall.

Ann Romney says in an interview, "We've been looking at that and I love that option as well."

She tells CBS News she thinks the person selected for the No. 2 spot should be "someone that obviously can do the job but will be able to carry through with some of the other responsibilities."