time

Like so many of us, including most of America’s workforce, and nearly two-thirds of all university students, Andrew Santella procrastinates. Concerned about his habit, but not quite ready to give it up, he set out to learn all he could about the human tendency to delay. He studied history’s greatest procrastinators to gain insights into human behavior, and also, he writes, to kill time, “research being the best way to avoid real work.” His new book is "Soon: An Overdue History of Procrastination, from Leonardo and Darwin to You and Me."

Andrew Santella has written for such publications as GQ, the New York Times Book Review, Slate, and the Atlantic.com.

Daniel Pink looks to change the way we live by changing how we think. From “To Sell Is Human” to “Drive to A Whole New Mind,” Pink’s New York Times-bestselling books illuminate the hidden forces that affect our lives in major ways. His new book, “When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing,” shows us the keys to timing our decisions and actions so that we can thrive both personally and professionally. 

Drawing on a range of scientific research in the fields of psychology, biology, economics and anthropology, Pink reveals how we can use the hidden patterns of the day to succeed in all facets of our lives. 

Neil deGrasse Tyson
MILLER MOBLEY / REDUX

  Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson is director of the Hayden Planetarium, hosts Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey and is the former host of NOVA ScienceNOW on PBS. On April 24 he returns to Proctors with an all-new show: "The Cosmic Perspective."

There is no view of the world as emotionally potent as the one granted by a cosmic perspective. It's one that sees Earth as a planet in a vast empty universe. It profoundly influences what we think and feel about science, culture, politics, and life itself.

Alan Burdick is a staff writer and former senior editor at The New Yorker and a frequent contributor to Elements, the magazine’s science-and-tech blog.

“Time” is the most commonly used noun in the English language; it’s always on our minds and it advances through every living moment. But what is time, exactly? Do children experience it the same way adults do? Why does it seem to slow down when we’re bored and speed by as we get older? How and why does time fly?

In Why Time Flies: A Mostly Scientific Investigation, award-winning author and New Yorker staff writer Alan Burdick takes readers on a personal quest to understand how time gets in us and why we perceive it the way we do.

It has been called “the great destroyer” and “the evil.” The Pentagon refers to it as “the pervasive menace.” It destroys cars, fells bridges, sinks ships, sparks house fires, and nearly brought down the Statue of Liberty. Rust costs America more than $400 billion per year—more than all other natural disasters combined.

Journalist Jonathan Waldman travels from Key West, Florida, to Prudhoe Bay, Alaska to learn how rust affects everything from the design of our currency to the composition of our tap water. Jonathan Waldman’s new book Rust: The Longest War explores how this substance could determine the legacy we leave on this planet.