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Peter Crowley stands in front of the Adirondack Daily Enterprise offices in Saranac Lake
Aaron Cerbone / Adirondack Daily Enterprise

In August 1999, Peter Crowley came to the Adirondacks and began working as a reporter for the Adirondack Daily Enterprise. In the fall of 2004 he became its managing editor. After nearly 22 years writing and editing stories about the Adirondacks at the award-winning paper, Crowley felt it was time to pursue a new career and left the Enterprise on June 25th. When he graduated from college, he dreamed of being an English teacher, and he’s now begun classes to obtain his teaching credentials.  Crowley spoke with WAMC's North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley about two decades covering northern New York.

NYS Congratulates 2020 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching Finalists
Courtesy of the NYS Education Department

Finalists have been selected for the presidential awards for excellence in teaching math and science. And the two from New York teach in the Hudson Valley.

8/18/20 Panel

Aug 18, 2020
Microphone in radio studio
WAMC / WAMC

    

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, The Empire Report’s J.P. Miller, and former Associate Editor of The Times Union Mike Spain.

Pawan Dhingra is Professor of American Studies at Amherst College. He is the author of many books, including "Life Behind the Lobby: Indian American Motel Owners and the American Dream." His work has been featured in the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, The New York Times, Salon, the PBS News Hour, and the documentary, "Breaking the Bee."

In "Hyper Education," he uncovers the growing world of high-achievement education and the after-school learning centers, spelling bees, and math competitions that it has spawned.

Today on the show two teachers offer advice and answer questions about teaching at home during the pandemic. Call in with your questions about English, Math, or remote learning. Ray Graf hosts.

James McBride is the author of the National Book Award winning "The Good Lord Bird" and the modern classic "The Color of Water." His new book is "Deacon King Kong," a wise and witty tale about what happens to the witnesses of a shooting. 

When Lois Letchford learns her son has been diagnosed with a low IQ at the end of grade one, she refuses to give up on his future. After thorough testing, Nicholas proves to have no spatial awareness, limited concentration, and can only read ten words.

Nicholas is labeled "learning disabled," a designation considered more derogatory than "dyslexia," the world of education is quick to cast him aside. Determined to prove them all wrong, Lois temporarily removes her son from the school system and begins working with him one-on-one.

What happens next is a journey: spanning three continents, unique teaching experiments, never-ending battles with the school system, a mother’s discovery of her own learning blocks, and a bond fueled by the desire to rid Nicholas of the “disabled” label.

Lois Letchford's book is "Reversed: A Memoir."

Jal Mehta is Associate Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where he has received the Morningstar Award, presented annually to the best teacher at the school. He is author of "The Allure of Order: High Hopes, Dashed Expectations, and the Troubled Quest to Remake American Schooling."

With Sarah Fine he has co-authored a new book entitled "In Search of Deeper Learning: The Quest to Remake the American High School."

The story they tell is alternately discouraging and hopeful. Drawing on hundreds of hours of observations and interviews at thirty different schools, Mehta and Fine reveal that deeper learning is more often the exception than the rule. And yet they find pockets of powerful learning at almost every school, often in electives and extracurriculars as well as in a few mold-breaking academic courses. These spaces achieve depth, the authors argue, because they emphasize purpose and choice, cultivate community, and draw on powerful traditions of apprenticeship. These outliers suggest that it is difficult but possible for schools and classrooms to achieve the integrations that support deep learning: rigor with joy, precision with play, mastery with identity and creativity.

    Helping students develop their ability to deliberate political questions is an essential component of democratic education, but introducing political issues into the classroom is pedagogically challenging and raises ethical dilemmas for teachers.

In their book, The Political Classroom: Evidence and Ethics in Democratic Education, Diana E. Hess and Paula McAvoy argue that teachers will make better professional judgments about these issues if they aim toward creating "political classrooms," which engage students in deliberations about questions that ask, "How should we live together?"

A Saratoga Springs middle school teacher, acquitted of charges associated with allegedly making inappropriate contact with a 14-year-old female student, has been terminated by the school district. 

At a special meeting of the Saratoga Springs Board of Education held Monday evening, members of the public were allowed to comment on the recommended termination of middle school mathematics teacher Joseph Bruno.