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students

Students Macy, Cameron, and Thomas speak during Wednesday's Facebook Live update
Saratoga County Office of Emergency Services/Facebook

At a time when they’d normally just now be heading home for the summer, Saratoga County schoolchildren shared their experiences of learning from home and imparted a little advice about how to get through the pandemic.

As protesters roil the campus, National Guardsmen are called in. In the chaos of what happens next, shots are fired and four students are killed. To this day, there is still argument of what happened and why.

Told in multiple voices from a number of vantage points, Deborah Wiles's "Kent State" gives a moving, terrifying, galvanizing picture of what happened that weekend in Ohio - an event that, even 50 years later, still resonates deeply.

Deborah Wiles is the author of the picture book "Freedom Summer" and the novels: "Love, Ruby Lavender;" "The Aurora County All-Stars;" and "Each Little Bird That Sings," a National Book Award finalist, and "A Long Line of Cakes." She is also the author of the documentary novels "Countdown" and "Revolution," a National Book Award Finalist, and "Anthem."

Dr. James Hansen
https://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/

**We weren't able to conduct the scheduled interview with Dr. James Hansen but leave this post on our site to provide information about the summit.**

The Woodstock Day School and the Ashokan Center have teamed up to co-sponsor The Youth Empowerment & Sustainability Summit (YESS!); a global climate solution and leadership summit for young people who are ready to change their lives and their communities by working towards climate resilience.

The three-day summit is designed to empower students from middle school through college by teaching them to develop solutions-based thinking and civic engagement skills.

Dr. James Hansen, the renowned climate scientist who was among the first to sound the alarm of global climate change.

He delivered the summit’s keynote address this morning at Ashokan Center and tonight he’ll present a “Catskill Conversations” talk sponsored by the Ashokan Center at Kingston High School at 7 p.m. Tonight’s talk is open to the public.

In late summer 1940, as war spread across Europe and as the nation pulled itself out of the Great Depression, an anti-communist hysteria convulsed New York City. Targeting the city’s municipal colleges and public schools, the New York state legislature’s Rapp-Coudert investigation dragged hundreds of suspects before public and private tribunals to root out a perceived communist conspiracy to hijack the city’s teachers unions, subvert public education, and indoctrinate the nation’s youth.

Drawing on the vast archive of Rapp-Coudert records, Union College History Professor Andrew Feffer looks to provide the first full history of this witch-hunt, which lasted from August 1940 to March 1942.

He does so in the new book: "Bad Faith: Teachers, Liberalism, and the Origins of McCarthyism." Andrew Feffer is Professor of History and Co-Director of the Interdisciplinary Program in Film Studies at Union College.

Rep. Maloney Answers Questions At Student Town Hall

Feb 4, 2019
WAMC, Allison Dunne

New York Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney held a student town hall in his hometown Monday. Some 40 high school students packed a classroom on their lunch break and asked a variety of questions on topics ranging from current events to holding political office in general.

Seiji Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood
Sarah LaDuke

The Days in the Arts (DARTS) program is a summer residential program near Tanglewood that provides middle school students with high-quality arts immersion experience, allowing each student to engage with and create art with their peers in a positive, non-judgmental environment.

The program unites students from urban, suburban and rural communities – and has been doing so for 50 years! Each summer since 1968, the BSO operates the Days in the Arts residential education program that invites students from across Massachusetts to gather together to explore the arts. DARTS serves 400 middle school students each summer during eight one-week sessions.

We are joined by the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s Executive Officer for Education, Community Engagement, and Inclusion, Zakiya Thomas and the Associate Director of Education and Community Engagement Claire Carr. 

The Berkshire Theatre Group’s Education Department brings performing arts into the lives of 13,000 schoolchildren in The Berkshires through touring productions, residency programs, internships and assistantships, after-school programming, camps, children’s theatre productions, seasonal employment opportunities, and more.

Many of our schools lack the funds to provide students with arts education. Berkshire Theatre Group’s Education Department strives – all year long – to fill that gap. Their programs offer children the chance to perform, of course, but also to learn, to build confidence, and to collaborate.

We are joined by Travis Daly, BTG’s Artistic Associate of Education (and director of this summer’s production of "Tarzan"); Allison Rachele Bayles, BTG's Administrative Director of Education; and Hanna Koczela who has been involved with BTG Community Productions and Education Programs for the past 10 years and has just graduated from High School.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences joins us to talk about their new innitiative, “The Collaboratory.”

Located in Albany’s South End, this space will be used by both the College and Trinity Alliance and serve as the home base for the REACH program. The purpose of this program is to engage, empower, and activate Medicaid and Medicaid-eligible residents of the South End and nearby neighborhoods to make consistent use of preventative health care and wellness systems.

Beyond serving this need, the Collaboratory will host classes for both ACPHS students as well as for community residents. The space will also be available for community group meetings, and we expect to add more services in the years to come. Below is list of suggested questions to help guide the discussion.

We welcome ACPHS President, Dr. Greg Dewey and Dr. Colleen McLaughlin. Colleen is a professor at the College and also serves as the Chair of their Department of Population Health Sciences.

WAMC Elizabeth Hill

Students hosted a discussion about gun violence in schools yesterday at Shaker High School in Latham, New York with Congressman Paul Tonko. 

From an award-winning, “meticulously observant” (The New Yorker) writer, Helen Thorpe, comes a powerful and moving account of how refugee teenagers at a Denver public high school learn English and become Americans.

The Newcomers follows the lives of twenty-two immigrant teenagers throughout the course of the 2015-2016 school year as they land at South High School in Denver, Colorado, in an English Language Acquisition class created specifically for them. Speaking no English, unfamiliar with American culture, their stories are poignant and remarkable as they face the enormous challenge of adapting. These newcomers, from fourteen to nineteen years old, come from nations convulsed by drought or famine or war. Many come directly from refugee camps, after experiencing dire forms of cataclysm. Some arrive alone, having left or lost every other member of their original family.

Helen Thorpe is an award-winning journalist who lives in Denver, Colorado. Her journalism has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, Texas Monthly, and 5280.

Our "Falling into Place" series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise … see more progress.

STARS Intergen Corp. provides opportunities for seniors in the towns of Bethlehem and Coeymans to enhance the educational experience for Ravina-Coeymens-Selkirk students. We are joined by Bill Schwartz, STARS Intergen's Board President and Linda S. Bruno, Executive Director.

A new sexual revolution is sweeping the country, and college students are on the front lines. Women use fresh, smart methods to fight entrenched sexism and sexual assault even as they celebrate their own sexuality as never before. Many “woke” male students are more sensitive to women’s concerns than previous generations ever were, while other men perpetuate the most cruel misogyny. Amid such apparent contradictions, it’s no surprise that intense confusion shrouds the topic of sex on campus.

Vanessa Grigoriadis dispels that confusion as no other writer could by traveling to schools large and small, embedding in their social whirl, and talking candidly with dozens of students – among them, both accusers and accused-- as well as administrators, parents, and researchers. Her unprecedented investigation presents a host of new truths. She reveals which times and settings are most dangerous for women (for instance, beware the “red zone”); she demystifies the welter of conflicting statistics about the prevalence of campus rape; she makes a strong case that not all “sexual assault” is equivalent; and she offers convincing if controversial advice on how schools, students, and parents can make college a safer, richer experience. The sum of her fascinating, fly-on-the-wall reportage is a revelatory account of how long-standing rules of sex and power are being rewritten from scratch.

Vanessa Grigoriadis is a contributing editor at The New York Times magazine and Vanity Fair. Her new book is Blurred Lines: Rethinking Sex, Power, and Consent on Campus.

Seiji Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood
Sarah LaDuke

As you walk along Tanglewood’s meandering paths, it’s easy to miss a series of small wooden shacks nestled amongst the pine trees -- until you hear the sweet music emanating from within. It’s here that the Tanglewood Music Center Fellows hone their craft and learn from the masters.

For decades, talented young musicians from around the country and around the globe have been coming to the Berkshires to study with some of the best musicians in the world.  Today we’re joined by Ellen Highstein – the Director of the Tanglewood Music Center.

  In his new book Creative Schools, Sir Ken Robinson offers a roadmap to parents, educators and administrators on how to transform the way our schools work, highlighting schools around the world that have already begun this process and giving practical examples of what works.

One of the schools Robinson profiles is Smokie Road Middle School in Newnan, Georgia, which had the odds stacked against it with consistently low academic achievement ratings and a high poverty level. When a new principal arrived and focused on the everyday needs of each individual student and strove to meet those needs by prioritizing what the student found to be important - she had dramatic results and saw improvement on every level.

  Sir Ken Robinson is one of the world’s most influential educators. Listed by Fast Company as “one of the world’s elite thinkers on creativity and innovation,” he advises governments, corporations, and leading cultural institutions.

In his new book, Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education, he shows parents, educators and administrators how they can transform the way our schools work. He says - by focusing first on the students and teachers (not test scores), schools can evolve into the organic, personal learning environments they deserve to be.

As the legislative session winds down in New York, there's an eleventh hour push to promote a measure that would prevent and protect health professionals from participating in torture - WAMC's Capital Region Bureau Chief Dave Lucas spoke this morning with Dr. Allen Keller, Director of the Bellevue/NYU Program for Survivors of Torture, who is in Albany today in support of the bill.

    We speak with Dave Tomar about his book, The Shadow Scholar: How I Made a Living Helping College Kids Cheat.

WAMC

Thirteen students from six Vermont colleges and universities are spending their summer working on long-term recovery projects from storm Irene.

The group in charge is the Vermont Campus Compact's Statewide Internships for Vermont Recovery. The program is starting today.

The undergraduate and graduate students will take on a variety of projects that range from working with flood survivors to improving emergency response plans. They will take part in the continuing cleanup effort and assess environmental damage following the storm last August.