Springfield tornado | WAMC

Springfield tornado

the former Brookings school building
City of Springfield

       The green light has been given to fund 15 projects in Springfield under the Massachusetts Community Preservation Act program.

Screen capture by WAMC

       A large lake in the city of Springfield, Massachusetts will be drawn down starting this fall to allow for repairs to a dam that state inspectors have categorized as “High Hazard.” 

WAMC

    A major roadway improvement project that involved multiple eminent domain property takings has been completed in Springfield, Massachusetts.

artists' rendering of Central Street in Springfield
City of Springfield

More than eight years after a tornado devastated a low-income neighborhood in Springfield, Massachusetts a major infrastructure improvement project is underway. 

artists' rendering of Central Street in Springfield
City of Springfield

    Eight years after a tornado roared through a low-income neighborhood in Springfield, Massachusetts, construction is expected to start this summer on a key improvement project.

The first new library in 20 years is being built in Springfield, Massachusetts.  The $10 million project is being paid for by the state and the city while a campaign to raise additional public funds passed a milestone.

A rendering of part of the interior of the new East Forest Park Library Branch.
Springfield City Library

Bids have been opened to build a new Massachusetts state-funded library branch in Springfield.

WAMC

  

            The newest park in Springfield. Massachusetts honors a fallen U.S. Marine and keeps a promise to the neighborhood where he grew up.

    A new $10 million neighborhood community center has been built in Springfield, Massachusetts. It is one of the last major rebuilding projects from the June 2011 tornado that tore through part of the city.

exterior of a former U.S. Army reserve center that is to become a Springfield Police Dept Annex.
WAMC

A $30 million settlement from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) following the June 1, 2011 tornado in Springfield, Massachusetts is paying for three construction projects.

A former National Guard armory building is being converted for use by the police department. A brand new senior center is being built. And, a brand new neighborhood center is being constructed to replace one destroyed by the storm six years ago. 

Each of the buildings, when finished, will benefit people throughout the city. 

WAMC

       

        The city of Springfield is planning to take by eminent domain more than a dozen properties, including a public housing authority complex, to improve access and parking for a new community center.  The $10 million South End Community Center is one of the last major rebuilding projects from the tornado that struck the city six years ago next month.

Eversource

        The National Weather Service confirmed a tornado touched down in western Massachusetts over the weekend. 

         It is the first recorded February tornado in Massachusetts since official record keeping started in 1950.  

          WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill spoke with Christopher Besse, the spokesman for the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency.

WAMC

   

   Plans are moving forward to construct a new branch library in a Springfield neighborhood that is recovering from the tornado of 2011.

WAMC

Public input is being sought for a climate action plan for the city of Springfield, Massachusetts.  The Springfield Climate Justice Coalition is holding a series of community meetings.

WAMC

      A project is under way to ensure that the only top level trauma hospital in western Massachusetts will be able to function in the event a disaster knocks out the power grid for an extended length of time.

WAMC

     Work has begun to secure a dam in western Massachusetts that was flagged almost a decade ago as a threat to public safety and property.

WAMC

    Dozens of blighted buildings have been torn down in the city of Springfield, Massachusetts in the last 18 months since the city council approved a $2 million demolition bond.  The city’s efforts at neighborhood revitalization were highlighted at on e such demolition project today.

WAMC

     Construction is under way on the last major rebuilding project stemming from the June 2011 tornado that tore through Springfield, Massachusetts.

WAMC

    Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker proclaimed September “Emergency Preparedness Month” and urged residents to plan ahead in the event disaster strike.

Diocese of Springfield

The much anticipated plans have been announced for building a new regional Catholic high school in western Massachusetts.

Diocese of Springfield

   Two events have been scheduled to lead up to the start of construction this fall for a new regional Catholic high school in western Massachusetts.

WAMC

Private reflections and the tolling of church bells today marked the fifth anniversary of an unprecedented natural disaster in western Massachusetts.  A tornado, with sustained winds of 160 miles-an-hour claimed three lives, injured scores of people, left children emotionally scarred, and damaged or destroyed hundreds of buildings and tens of thousands of trees.

artists' rendering of Central Street in Springfield
City of Springfield

A tornado recovery project in Springfield, Massachusetts has encountered some turbulence over possible property-takings by eminent domain. 

WAMC

It has been nearly five years since a powerful tornado tore through western Massachusetts and the city of Springfield is still settling up financially with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

The city announced a $13.8 million grant from FEMA Monday as compensation for the destruction of a neighborhood community center during the tornado on June 1, 2011.  The federal agency had initially rejected the city’s $18 million damage claim, but after several appeals – and nudges from Congressman Richard Neal – a settlement was reached.

WAMC

The city of Springfield, Massachusetts, which experienced five presidentially-declared disasters in a two-year span, including a tornado and two blizzards, is getting federal funds to help with recovery and to prepare for future disasters.

WAMC

More than $9 million in state funding has been awarded to three western Massachusetts cities to pay for infrastructure such as new sewer and water mains and streetscape work needed to support housing and other economic development projects.

The state grants will help support an effort to repair and preserve one of the oldest public housing complexes in the nation located in the city of Holyoke, convert an old mill building in Chicopee into loft apartments, and reconfigure one of the most dangerous traffic intersections in the region: the “Six Corners” in Springfield.

WAMC

The city is offering financial support to owners of historic buildings damaged in the 2011 tornado that tore through western Massachusetts.

WAMC

The city accepted the bid from Fontaine Bros. Inc., one of seven bids submitted to build the new South End Community Center.  Officials had set a $9.2 million price ceiling for the project, which is being paid for with federal disaster aid.  No timetable for the project has been announced, but a groundbreaking is expected this fall.

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno said the project is a big step forward in the city’s recovery from the disaster.

WAMC

Four years after a tornado destroyed a neighborhood community center, officials in Springfield, Massachusetts are seeking construction bids to build a new center.

     The city plans to build the new South End Community Center in a park several blocks from the building that was hit by the tornado on June 1,2011.  General contractors have until July 31st to submit competing bids for the project, which has an estimated cost of $9.2 million.  Construction is scheduled to begin by September.

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The third largest city in Massachusetts will again have a Catholic high school.  Plans for a new school were unveiled today, more than four years after a tornado wrecked Springfield’s Cathedral High School.

After months of private study by the Springfield Diocese and public campaigning by advocates for a Catholic high school in Springfield, Bishop Mitchell Rozanski Friday made the much-anticipated announcement of the site he selected.

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