Springfield COVID-19 | WAMC

Springfield COVID-19

Judy Matt, President of Spirit of Springfield, with Springfield city officials and sponsors announces plans for the July 4th fireworks show at Riverfront Park.
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

   Fireworks will again explode in brilliant colors over the Connecticut River in Springfield this Fourth of July. 

Mayor Domenic Sarno at his office desk
WAMC

   Most COVID-19 restrictions in Massachusetts will end this Saturday.

Springfield City Councilor Jesse Lederman
Jesse Lederman / Twitter

    As pandemic restrictions are about to be lifted in Massachusetts, a town hall has been scheduled in Springfield.

Mayor Domenic Sarno sans mask
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

     In a sharp acceleration of the timetable for fully reopening Massachusetts, Gov. Charlie Baker announced today that all COVID-19-era business restrictions will end on May 29th.   Also on that day, the mask mandate will be lifted and replaced with one that follows current CDC guidelines.  Whether all municipalities in the state will go along, or choose to keep some restrictions in place a bit longer, remains to be seen.

exterior of the Springfield Central Library
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

    Public libraries in Massachusetts have been allowed to reopen since March, but it will be late summer before patrons can again browse the shelves of the libraries in Springfield.

Springfield Health and Human Services Commissioner Helen Caulton-Harris with a chart
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

   As virus activity continues to decline in Massachusetts and more COVID-19 restrictions are lifted, Springfield lags behind.

a hoopless basketball backboard
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

   After public pressure, hoops will be going back up in public parks in the birthplace of basketball.

The COVID-19 vaccine moves from cold storage at the Department of Health to coolers and is transported to the TU Center for mass vaccination clinics.
Jackie Orchard / WAMC

    As Massachusetts approaches a goal set by Gov. Charlie Baker to have 4.1 million residents vaccinated against COVID-19 by June, the vaccination strategy is shifting to reach the wary and hard to get. 

a hoopless basketball backboard
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

Plans are in the works to reopen swimming pools and summer camps in Springfield, Massachusetts, but not outdoor basketball courts.

Vials of COVID-19 vaccine
Jackie Orchard / WAMC

  The city of Springfield is pushing to convince more young adults to get vaccinated against COVID-19. 

Vials of COVID-19 vaccine
Jackie Orchard / WAMC

    Coronavirus infections are rising in Springfield, Massachusetts even as vaccines become more widely available.

A wheel chart showing COVID infections by age groups
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

   With a majority of new coronavirus infections occurring in younger people in Springfield, Massachusetts, efforts are planned to encourage vaccinations.

a bar graph of covid cases.
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

     Springfield, Massachusetts is again at high risk for community spread of the coronavirus. 

small desks in a school classroom
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

     Students will return to classrooms Monday in Springfield, Massachusetts for the first time in more than a year.   Officials held a news conference today to announce all the COVID-19 safety protocols that have been put in place. 

Dr. Mark Keroack speaking at podium
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

     In what some see as the start of a Spring surge, coronavirus infections are again on the rise in Massachusetts.

a sandwich board sign
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

    As part of an ongoing effort to bring coronavirus vaccine to populations hit hardest by the pandemic, public health officials in Springfield, Massachusetts announced a partnership with a behavioral health care provider. 

COVID-19 was first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China and has now been detected in 37 locations across the globe, including in the U.S., according to the CDC.
Composite Image by Dave Lucas (WAMC / cdc.gov)

     Springfield, Massachusetts has reached a milestone in efforts to combat the coronavirus.

a poster promoting a covid vaccination town hall
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

     In an effort to boost coronavirus vaccination rates in Springfield, Massachusetts, Mayor Domenic Sarno appointed a committee of medical experts and community leaders.

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno with face covering
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

    The mayor of Springfield, Massachusetts Monday marked the one-year anniversary of weekly public status reports on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Raymond A Jordan Senior Center exterior
WAMC

     The Baker administration has approved a plan for neighborhood coronavirus vaccination sites in the largest city in western Massachusetts.

health care workers stand outside a hospital
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

    The one-year anniversary of the coronavirus pandemic is being marked in Springfield, Massachusetts.

Springfield Health and Human Services Commissioner Helen Caulton-Harris with a chart
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

  Approaching the one-year anniversary of the coronavirus public health emergency in Massachusetts on Wednesday, there is optimism as new COVID-19 cases fall and vaccinations increase.  

a school building
WAMC

        The largest public school district in western Massachusetts will seek a waiver if the state orders a return next month to in-person learning five days a week.

Springfield Mayor Domenic Sarno
WAMC

     The mayor of Springfield, Massachusetts continues to lobby the Baker administration to authorize neighborhood coronavirus vaccine clinics. 

people going through a door with a COVID vaccination sign on it.
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

   Data on vaccinations that have taken place at one of the large scale vaccination sites in Massachusetts has raised equity concerns. 

a chart of weekly COVID-19 cases.
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

     After six weeks of declining new COVID-19 cases in Springfield, Massachusetts, there has been a slight surge.

COVID-19 Diagram
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

       The number of new COVID-19 cases in Springfield, Massachusetts continues to go down as the state picks up the pace of  vaccinations for the coronavirus.

people going through a door with a COVID vaccination sign on it.
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

   

   After a slow start, Massachusetts officials are accelerating efforts to get COVID-19 vaccines into the arms of people across the state. 

Dr. Mark Keroack speaking at podium
Paul Tuthill / WAMC

       As vaccination efforts continue, the winter surge in coronavirus infections appears to be retreating in the largest city in western Massachusetts.

State Senator Eric Lesser holding a microphone
Youtube

    With complaints rising about a slow and uneven rollout of the coronavirus vaccine in Massachusetts, the state legislature is planning to step up oversight.

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