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At least 21% of Americans -- over 60 million people -- believe in Bigfoot, nearly half a million people planned a failed attempt to storm area 51 last summer, and people are still trying to figure out what the hell happened during the Great Kentucky meat shower of 1876.

In a world where rational scientific explanations are more available than ever belief in the unprovable and irrational in the fringe is on the rise. It seems the more our maps of the known world get filled in, the more we crave mysterious locations full of strange creatures.

Enter Colin Dickey, cultural historian and tour guide of the weird. he explores this wonderful world of fringe beliefs and conspiracy theories in his new book: "The Unidentified: Mythical Monsters, Alien Encounters, and Our Obsession with the Unexplained."

Renowned astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson is the author of the New York Times best-selling book, “Astrophysics for People in a Hurry.” His new book, “Letters From An Astrophysicist,” shares his correspondence with people who have sought his perspective on questions about science, faith, philosophy and, of course, Pluto.

The majority of celestial space is inactive and will remain forever unruffled. But when cosmic violence does unfold, it changes the very fabric of the universe, with mega-explosions and ripple effects that reach the near limits of human comprehension. In his new book “Earth-Shattering,” astronomy writer Bob Berman investigates these instances of violence both mammoth and microscopic.

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy proposed the nation spend twenty billion dollars to land a man on the Moon before the end of the decade.

Based on eyewitness accounts and newly discovered archival material, "Chasing the Moon" by Robert Stone and Alan Andres, reveals for the first time the unknown stories of the fascinating individuals whose imaginative work across several decades culminated in America’s momentous achievement.

More than a story of engineers and astronauts, the moon landing, now celebrating its fiftieth anniversary, grew out of the dreams of science fiction writers, filmmakers, military geniuses, and rule-breaking scientists.

Strange Universe 6/30/19

Jun 30, 2019
Pixabay

On this week's episode Bob Berman discusses a new theory that is infinite in size and space.

Strange Universe 6/23/19

Jun 23, 2019
U.S. Air Force

This week on Strange Universe Bob Berman discusses the increasing number of satellites in the night sky.

Paul Jarvis left the corporate world when he realized that working in a high-pressure, high profile world was not his idea of success. Instead, he now works for himself out of his home on a small, lush island off of Vancouver, and lives a much more rewarding and productive life. He no longer has to contend with an environment that constantly demands more productivity, more output, and more growth.

In "Company of One," Jarvis explains how you can find the right pathway to do the same, including planning how to set up your shop, determining your desired revenues, dealing with unexpected crises, keeping your key clients happy, and of course, doing all of this on your own.

Strange Universe 10/5/18

Oct 7, 2018
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On this week's Strange Universe Bob Berman discusses the perfect cosmic panorama.

The Saratoga Performing Arts Center's Out of This World Festival features the first speaker series on the SPAC Stage. Attendees will sit in the orchestra chairs on the main stage of the SPAC amphitheater while renowned guest speakers lead captivating talks from the conductor’s podium on a variety of topics that bridge the worlds of art, science, and nature.

Speakers @ SPAC: Earth and Other Worlds is presented in cooperation with the Academy of American Poets. Science writer Dava Sobel ("Galileo’s Daughter;" "The Glass Universe") will be in conversation with poet, science writer, and author Diane Ackerman ("A Natural History of the Senses;" "The Human Age;" "The Zookeeper’s Wife"). Dava Sobel joined us.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss back-up storage for our devices and how to save everything – and get rid of things.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer and author. His most recent app is Utility Smart (in the App Store); recent books are iPad for Seniors for Dummies, and Exploring Swift Playgrounds.

Neil deGrasse Tyson
MILLER MOBLEY / REDUX

  Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson is director of the Hayden Planetarium, hosts Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey and is the former host of NOVA ScienceNOW on PBS. On April 24 he returns to Proctors with an all-new show: "The Cosmic Perspective."

There is no view of the world as emotionally potent as the one granted by a cosmic perspective. It's one that sees Earth as a planet in a vast empty universe. It profoundly influences what we think and feel about science, culture, politics, and life itself.

  Half a century after walking on the moon, iconic astronaut Buzz Aldrin reflects on a lifetime of achievements and what he’s learned through it all in his new book, No Dream Is Too High: Life Lessons from a Man Who Walked on the Moon. Aldrin, speaks intimately and from the heart, sharing his experiences in space, in war, and as a public figure.

Buzz Aldrin, best known for his Apollo 11 moonwalk, holds a doctoral degree in astronautics and, at age 86, continues to wield influence as an international advocate of space science and planetary exploration.

  The Blue-Sky Boys dramatizes the unorthodox creative process used by a group of maverick engineers at NASA to land men on the moon.  It’s a wild comedy about the beginnings of the Apollo space mission and about the crossroads of science and art.

Capital Repertory Theater in Albany, NY will launch (pun intended) a production of the play directed by Gordon Greenberg. Previews begin tonight and the show opens on Tuesday.

The show is written by Deborah Brevoort who joins us to tell us more. 

  Legendary "space statesman" Buzz Aldrin is a vital advocate for the continuing quest to push the boundaries of the universe as we know it.

As a pioneering astronaut who first set foot on the moon during mankind's first landing of Apollo 11--and as an aerospace engineer who designed an orbital rendezvous technique critical to future planetary landings--Aldrin has a vision, and in his new book, Mission to Mars: My Vision for Space Exploration, he plots out the path he proposes, taking humans to Mars by 2035.

marshall.org

A talk at Berkshire Community College Saturday will focus on NASA’s search for life beyond Earth and the age-old question of “Are we alone in the universe?” The speaker is Professor John Delano of the University at Albany. A member of the school’s department of atmospheric and environmental studies, Delano has served as principal investigator in NASA’s astrobiology program and as associate director of the New York Center for Astrobiology.

Jim Bell, planetary scientist and professor in the school of earth and space exploration at Arizona State University, tells the phenomenal story of the Voyager spacecraft expedition in his new book, The Interstellar Age: Inside the Forty-Year Voyager Mission.

As a scientist whose career has been closely tied to the mission from its inception, Bell delivers a detailed account of the ambitious human stories connected to Voyager and explores the mind-bending scientific accomplishments of humanity’s greatest space mission.

2/18/15 Panel

Feb 18, 2015

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, SUNY at Albany journalism professor and investigative journalist, Rosemary Armao, and Associate Editor of The Times Union, Mike Spain.

Topics include: Obama on immigration, Syria announces possible truce, Warren-Clinton Meeting, Deblasio/Police, Trip to Mars, and stories from the Times Union.

  Much has been written about Neil Armstrong, America’s modern hero and history’s most famous space traveler.

Yet shy of fame and never one to steal the spotlight Armstrong was always reluctant to discuss his personal side of events. Here for the first time is the definitive story of Neil’s life of flight he shared for five decades with a trusted friend – Jay Barbree.

    Former New Paltz resident and 2003 Oakwood Friends School graduate Dr. Jennifer Yee, 29, will return to the School to present its annual Herzog Lecture, on Friday, May 2, at 10:30 a.m.

Dr. Yee, who has helped discover 15 planets, was one of five young astronomers in 2013 to be awarded a Carl Sagan Exoplanet Postdoctoral Fellowship by NASA. The prize fellowship, named for the late astronomer, was created to inspire the next generation of explorers seeking to learn more about planets, and possibly life, around stars other than the Sun. For her Sagan Fellowship, Dr. Yee is based at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass.

On this edition of Vox Pop, we welcome renowned astronomer Bob Berman to the studio to field all of your Astronomy-related questions.

One of the best-known and most widely-read astronomers in the world, Bob can translate complex scientific concepts into terms that are easily understood by the casual stargazer, yet meaningful to the most advanced researchers. WAMC's Ray Graf hosts.

nasa.gov

    The Dudley Observatory in Schenectady has a great program coming up next week at the Proctors GE Theater as part of their Skywatch Lecture Series.

Just this past summer the rover, Curiosity, landed on Mars. That project has ties to this region. Dr. Laurie Leshin of RPI is an integral part of the project and she'll present an insider's view of the mission and share some of the exciting results to date at 7:30pm on Tuesday 1/22 at the Proctors GE Theater.

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