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social media

Comedian Brent Terhune
Brent Terhune

With everyone stuck at home over the past several weeks, social media updates and videos have increasingly become a primary way to communicate. And in this odd political moment, Brent Terhune’s videos are getting more attention than ever.

Megan Angelo’s new novel, “Followers,” is an electrifying story of two ambitious friends, the dark choices they make and the stunning moment that changes the world as we know it forever

In the novel, Orla Cadden is a budding novelist stuck in a dead-end job, writing clickbait about movie-star hookups and influencer yoga moves. Then Orla meets Floss, a striving, wannabe A-lister, who comes up with a plan for launching them both into the high-profile lives they dream about. So, what if Orla and Floss’s methods are a little shady and sometimes people get hurt? Their legions of followers can’t be wrong.

Megan Angelo’s writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Glamour and Elle, among other publications. "Followers" is her debut novel.

Mark Zuckerberg built the original Facebook in barely one week during his sophomore year of college. Today, with almost 3 billion users, Facebook is an omnipresent global force. The company began with a gloriously idealistic goal: to connect the world. But Facebook has recently been bombarded with controversies surrounding election-influencing "fake news" accounts, the handling of its users' personal data, and the enormous power of its founder/CEO over what the world sees and says.

For three years, celebrated tech writer Steven Levy has had unprecedented access to Facebook’s key executives and employees, including Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg. His new book "Facebook: The Inside Story" digs deep into the company’s history, revealing fascinating new insights as he tells the full story of the company that has changed the world and reaped the consequences.

A New York state senator has introduced legislation to combat hate speech on social media.

"We often say that we want our students to be engaged, and this is what that looks like. " ~ UAlbany spokesperson
Composite Image by Dave Lucas (ualbany/twtter)

Members of the University at Albany campus community are reacting to the arrest of a visitor of color last week. 

Another month, another security breach and privacy is back in the news. Our tech-guru Jesse Feiler joins us to discuss a proposed Nation-wide Privacy Act.

California Consumer Privacy Act goes into effect January 1, 2020, and the General Data Protection Regulation in the EU is already in effect. Joe and Jesse discuss some of the issues including the good/bad/terrific/evil (take your pick) idea of having a nation-wide privacy act in the US.

Jesse Feiler is an author and developer who focuses on small business and nonprofits along with iOS technologies. He has recently added book publisher to his roles: his Champlain Arts business has published apps for a number of years, and has recently added books. Uta Hagen’s memoir “Sources” is back in print through ChamplainArts.com.

You use software nearly every instant you’re awake. It powers everything from social media, video games, and email to credit card fraud monitoring, smart home systems, and the brakes in your car. All of this software is written by computer programmers, and through their work, coders have become the most quietly influential people on the planet. If we want to understand how today’s world works, we ought to understand something about these digital architects.

In "Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World," tech journalist Clive Thompson draws on his access to today’s tech world to dive into the enigmatic world of coding and examine the consequences of the “programmer mentality.”

To join in on the conversation, we welcome our tech guru, app developer and author Jesse Feiler.

Roger McNamee is former mentor to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and then reluctantly became a critic of the way big tech companies like Facebook and Google are abusing their users’ trust.

His new book is: “Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe.”

In our increasingly networked and image-saturated lives, the notion of disappearing has never been both more enchanting. A lifelong student and observer of the natural world, Akiko Busch, set out to explore her own uneasiness with this arrangement. Her new book, “How to Disappear: Notes on Invisibility in a Time of Transparency.”

We’re all aware that innovations like smartphones and social media can have a negative impact on our lives, but the thought of quitting these technologies can scare us into believing we’ll be left disconnected and left behind.

According to Georgetown Computer Science Professor Cal Newport, the solution isn’t relying on tips and hacks to use technology less, and it isn’t an outright rejection either -- it’s a clear, simple philosophy for our technology use.

In his new book, "Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World," Newport suggests focusing your online time on a small number of carefully selected activities that strongly support things you value, allowing you to happily miss out on everything else.

A screenshot from the Town of Niskayuna's YouTube channel.
youtube

Local governments have been stepping up their online presence, employing technology as a tool for communicating transparency.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

A state lawmaker is proposing a change to New York's gun laws to allow authorities to search social media for potential red flags before approving a handgun license.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning as we discuss his 10 Tips for Dealing with Social Media in a Changing World.

Jesse Feiler's apps (published by Champlain Arts and available in the App Store) include Minutes Machine Plus for managing meetings and agendas, Saranac River Trail to help you explore the Trail and the City of Plattsburgh, Cyber Continuity which lets you learn about your vulnerabilities, the Nonprofit Risk App (a companion to Jesse’s book with Gail Nayowith), and Trails and Places to help you build your own self-guided trails using the model of the Saranac River Trail app.

Our attention has never been as overwhelmed or in demand as it is today. We've grown uncomfortable with boredom and the lack of stimulation or distraction, and instead try to cram as much into every moment of our life as we can. Many of us know our brains are unable to multitask, but feel compelled to do it anyway, in the process sacrificing our happiness, productivity, and even our creativity.

Productivity expert Chris Bailey looks to help with a simple and practical model he outlines in "Hyperfocus: How to Be More Productive in a World of Distraction."

pixabay.com

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning for a new-tech round-up. We’ll discuss several upcoming products and advancements.

Jesse Feiler's apps (published by Champlain Arts and available in the App Store) include Minutes Machine Plus for managing meetings and agendas, Saranac River Trail to help you explore the Trail and the City of Plattsburgh, Cyber Continuity which lets you learn about your vulnerabilities, the Nonprofit Risk App (a companion to Jesse’s book with Gail Nayowith), and Trails and Places to help you build your own self-guided trails using the model of the Saranac River Trail app.

Artwork for book "Broad Band"
clairelevans.com

The history of technology you probably know is one of men and machines, garages and riches, alpha nerds and “brogrammers.” But female visionaries have always been at the vanguard of technology and innovation.

In fact, women turn up at the very beginning of every important wave in technology. They may have been hidden in plain sight, their inventions and contributions touching our lives in ways we don't even realize, but they have always been part of the story.

VICE reporter and YACHT lead singer Claire Evans gives these female heroes their due in her new book: "Broad Band: The Untold Story of the Women Who Made the Internet."

Today’s students face a challenging paradox: the digital tools they need to complete their work are often the source of their biggest distractions. Students can quickly become overwhelmed trying to manage the daily confluence of online interactions with schoolwork, extracurricular activities, and family life. Written by author and educator Ana Homayoun, "Social Media Wellness" is the first book to successfully decode the new language of social media for parents and educators and provide pragmatic solutions to help students focus and manage distractions. 

Ana Homayoun is a noted teen and millennial expert, author, school consultant, speaker and educator. Her newest book is "Social Media Wellness: Helping Tweens and Teens Thrive in an Unbalanced Digital World."

Mamrie Hart is an actress, comedian, and New York Times bestselling author who established a presence in the pop culture zeitgeist with her hit YouTube channel, You Deserve a Drink.

Reaching more than three million followers across her social media channels and more than eighty-four million views on YouTube, Mamrie's influence as a creator earned her a position on Variety's annual list of Hollywood's New Leaders 2016 and a spot on The Hollywood Reporter's 2017 Digital Disrupters list.

Mamrie’s new essay collection is "I’ve Got This Round: More Tales of Debauchery."

Gabriel Kahane's Instagram feed


  Gabriel Kahane’s 8980: Book of Travelers is a new collection of songs inspired by the two-week train trip he took across the United States last November. He left on his un-plugged  journey the day after the 2016 election to meet and converse with dozens of strangers.

Created in collaboration with director Daniel Fish and designer Jim Findlay, 8980: Book of Travelers is a song cycle and solo stage show that will officially premiere at The Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave Festival later this fall. Tonight, In a kind of sneak-peek, Kahane will take the stage in The Hunter Center at MASS MoCA - where he’s been working on the piece in residency for about two weeks.

15th Ward Councilman Frank Commisso Jr.
Facebook

Some say President Donald Trump's fascination with twitter has led to social media rising as a factor in politics. And that may have trickled down to local races. The Capital Region is no exception.

Jonny Sun drawing jomny sun
Chris Buck / New York Times


  Jonathan Sun is an architect, designer, engineer, playwright and comedy writer, an artist, illustrator and a doctoral student at MIT and a Berkman Klein Fellow at Harvard -- and the creator of the Twitter persona jomny sun.

 

 

His work across these multiple disciplines is concerned with narratives of human experience. The new book, "Everyone's a Aliebn When Ur a Aliebn Too" - published by Harper Perennial - distributes aspects of his personality and observations from his life and education between jomny (an alien visiting Earth) and the creatures jomny encounters while here.

As a small example, in the book jomny has a conversation with a hedgehog who explains the difference between an introvert and an extrovert thusly: “introverts enjoy peopel-watching. extroverts enjoy peopel watching.” [sic]

 

In a blurb on the book jacket, Joss Whedon says of Everyone's a Aliebn When Ur a Aliebn Too: “This book is funny and sad, simple and complex, badly spelled and beautifully written.”

 

We spoke with Jonny Sun about the book, Twitter, his research, and @tinycarebot.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss the ins and outs of dealing with almighty #hashtag on social media..

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, author, and consultant working mostly with iOS and FileMaker for nonprofits, small businesses, and other organizations. His most recent books are iPad for Seniors for Dummies and Learn Apple HomeKit on iOS.

FuGenX CDC/Flickr

The Saratoga Springs City School District is looking for more information about a mysterious social media account that allegedly propagated hate speech.

Composite Image by Dave Lucas

Police agencies across New York are increasingly turning to social media to assist in law enforcement and to kick public outreach up a notch.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss social media in the news and as the news.  

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. Forthcoming books include “iPad For Seniors for Dummies" (9th edition) and “Learn Apple HomeKit on the Mac and iOS.”

Current projects involve using apps and FileMaker databases for identifying and managing risk in nonprofit organizations as well as helping small communities build location-based apps to promote tourism, downtown economic development, and the wise use of natural resources. 

A New York federal judge says he'll rule by the end of the week on a challenge to a state law banning people from showing their marked election ballot to others.

A public university in New York says "hashtag StopWhitePeople2K16," used as the title of a recent training session, was chosen for its irony — and the session — about diversity — wasn't anti-white.

Just about everyone is online these days. Many, many of us have a website, a Facebook account, or Twitter. But establishing an online presence isn’t simply a matter of turning on the computer and firing up a web browser. Cliff Rohde of GoatCloud Communications is here to answer your questions about establishing a presence online.

  For the past three years, Jon Ronson has travelled the world meeting recipients of high-profile public shamings. The shamed are people like us - people who, say, made a joke on social media that came out badly, or made a mistake at work. Once their transgression is revealed, collective outrage circles with the force of a hurricane and the next thing they know they're being torn apart by an angry mob, jeered at, demonized, sometimes even fired from their job.

Jon Ronson's book, So You've Been Publicly Shamed is now out in paperback.

  Award-winning journalist and author Nancy Jo Sales is the featured keynote speaker at The Woodstock Writers Festival this year. Her latest book is American Girls: Social Media and the Secret Lives of Teen­agers. She will be in conversation with Carla Goldstein, Omega Institute’s chief external affairs officer and co-founder of the Omega Women’s Leadership Center.

The dominant force in the lives of girls coming of age in America today is social media and Sales captures what it feels like to be a girl in America today. She crisscrossed the country, speaking to more than two hundred girls, ages thirteen to nineteen, and documenting a massive change in the way girls are growing up, a phenomenon that transcends race, geography, and household income.

American Girls provides a disturbing portrait of the end of childhood as we know it and of the inexorable and ubiquitous experience of a new kind of adolescence—one dominated by new social and sexual norms, where a girl’s first crushes and experiences of longing and romance occur in an accelerated electronic environment.

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