social change

The African American Cultural Center of the Capital Region, Inc., (AACCCR) is proud to present, for the third year in a row, The African American History Month Celebration at the Palace Theatre on Friday, February 24th at 7:00pm.

The annual celebration features the best and brightest talent in the region. This year’s theme is “Where Do We Go From Here?” focusing on participating in grass roots activism for social change. Bervin Harris, co-founder and CEO of the Renaissance Youth Group, will be the keynote speaker.

To give us a preview, we welcome Angela O’Neal – Executive Director of the African American Cultural Center of the Capital Region and Holly Brown – Executive Director of the Palace Theatre. 

Guapa By Saleem Haddad

Aug 23, 2016

  Set over the course of twenty-four hours, Guapa follows Rasa, a gay man living in an unnamed Arab country, as he tries to carve out a life for himself in the midst of political and social upheaval. Rasa spends his days translating for Western journalists and pining for the nights when he can sneak his lover, Taymour, into his room.

One night Rasa's grandmother — the woman who raised him — catches them in bed together. The following day Rasa is consumed by the search for his best friend Maj, a fiery activist and drag queen star of the underground bar, Guapa, who has been arrested by the police. Ashamed to go home and face his grandmother, and reeling from the potential loss of the three most important people in his life, Rasa roams the city’s slums and prisons, the lavish weddings of the country’s elite, and the bars where outcasts and intellectuals drink to a long-lost revolution. 

Andrew Solomon will be at Oblong Books on 5/14.   (This interview names the incorrect date for the event.)

  Far and Away collects Andrew Solomon’s writings about places undergoing seismic shifts—political, cultural, and spiritual.

Chronicling his stint on the barricades in Moscow in 1991, when he joined artists in resisting the coup whose failure ended the Soviet Union, his 2002 account of the rebirth of culture in Afghanistan following the fall of the Taliban, his insightful appraisal of a Myanmar seeped in contradictions as it slowly, fitfully pushes toward freedom, and many other stories of profound upheaval, this book provides a unique window onto the very idea of social change.

Geoffrey Canada has devoted his life to help change the quality of life of inner city children across the United States. From 1990 to 2014, he served as the President and Chief Executive Officer for the Harlem Children’s Zone, an organization which has guided more than 13,000 children and 14,000 adults through programs which focus on education, housing development, and community pride. In response to the program’s success, the Obama administration announced a replica program, Promise Neighborhoods, which in 2010 was awarded $10 million in federal grants in hopes of aiding 21 poverty-stricken communities in U.S. cities.

In 2011, Geoffrey Canada was named to the TIME 100 list of most influential people, and, in 2014, was named as one of Fortune’s 50 greatest leaders in the world. He will be speaking at Siena College’s Marcelle Athletic Complex on Thursday, March 26 at 7 p.m. as part of Siena’s Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King Lecture Series on Race and Nonviolent Social Change.