smartphone

Our tech-guru Jesse Feiler joins us to discuss current trends in tech.

Jesse Feiler is an author and developer who focuses on small business and nonprofits along with iOS technologies. He has recently added book publisher to his roles: his Champlain Arts business has published apps for a number of years, and has recently added books. Uta Hagen’s memoir Sources is back in print through ChamplainArts.com.

Another month, another security breach and privacy is back in the news. Our tech-guru Jesse Feiler joins us to discuss a proposed Nation-wide Privacy Act.

California Consumer Privacy Act goes into effect January 1, 2020, and the General Data Protection Regulation in the EU is already in effect. Joe and Jesse discuss some of the issues including the good/bad/terrific/evil (take your pick) idea of having a nation-wide privacy act in the US.

Jesse Feiler is an author and developer who focuses on small business and nonprofits along with iOS technologies. He has recently added book publisher to his roles: his Champlain Arts business has published apps for a number of years, and has recently added books. Uta Hagen’s memoir “Sources” is back in print through ChamplainArts.com.

Jesse Feiler - Emojis

Jul 23, 2019

World Emoji Day was last week. We didn’t want it to go by with notice. However, the day is much bigger than just your favorite emoji. World Emoji Day is a celebration of all emojis. So, we will talk about the power of emojis with our tech guru, Jesse Feiler.

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. His latest book is “Implementing iOS and macOS Documents with the Files App: Managing Files and ensuring compatibility.”

Roger McNamee is former mentor to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and then reluctantly became a critic of the way big tech companies like Facebook and Google are abusing their users’ trust.

His new book is: “Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe.”

Shoshana Zuboff is the Charles Edward Wilson Professor emerita, Harvard Business School. She is the author of In "The Age of the Smart Machine: the Future of Work and Power" and "The Support Economy: Why Corporations Are Failing Individuals and the Next Episode of Capitalism."

In her new book, "The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power," she brings to life the consequences of surveillance capitalism as it advances from Silicon Valley into every economic sector. Vast wealth and power are accumulated in ominous new "behavioral futures markets," where predictions about our behavior are bought and sold, and the production of goods and services is subordinated to a new "means of behavioral modification."

Zuboff's analysis lays bare the threats to twenty-first century society: a controlled "hive" of total connection that seduces with promises of total certainty for maximum profit; at the expense of democracy, freedom, and our human future. 

The University at Albany’s College of Emergency Preparedness Homeland Security and Cybersecurity has unveiled its new drone flight facility.
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Drones are increasingly becoming part of everyday life, from security to commerce to recreation. And now there’s a new place to study drones in Albany.

FEMA app Main Menu
FEMA

Summer is here, with hazy, hot and humid days that can give way to dangerous storms. It’s also hurricane season — and as the Northeast has learned in the past several years, we’re not immune.   FEMA is helping people prepare for severe weather with a new smartphone app.


WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Could Ma Bell be going the way of the telegraph? Ninety percent of New Yorkers now carry cell phones, while more than one-fifth of households across the state have disconnected their landlines, according to a newly-released Siena "smartphone" survey.

Courtesy NOAA

Information is critical during an emergency.  The Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency is embracing new technology to let the public know what is going on during weather emergencies and natural or man-made disasters.  WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill spoke with MEMA Public Information Officer Peter Judge.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Apple added what’s known as a "kill switch" to iPhones last September. Authorities say that has sharply reduced robberies and thefts of the popular smartphone. Now, Microsoft and Google will a kill switch to their smartphone operating systems.

A new study looks at how the caregiver-child dynamic is affected when the caregiver uses a mobile device during a fast food meal. The study is the latest to question how technology can influence childhood development.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Major cities across the Northeast are experiencing a spike in robberies, driven by crimes involving smartphones. New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman and U.S. Senator Chuck Schumer are taking steps to discourage thieves from targeting the devices.

Every minute, 113 smartphones are stolen or lost nationwide, according to New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who co-founded a partnership with the wireless industry called Secure Our Smartphones. The initiative has picked up support from 30 other state attorneys general.

FuGenX CDC/Flickr

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is getting tougher on drivers who text or chat on their phones while at the wheel.  Cuomo, the father of three teen-agers, said Friday that a change will go into effect starting Saturday. The revised penalty applies to any kind of cellphone activity while driving.  Drivers will see the penalty for texting while driving increase from three points off their driver’s licenses  to five points. Cuomo told CBS New York he spends a lot of time in a car and he sees people texting while driving every day.

Matthew Pearce / Flickr

New York’s attorney general is calling on the four major makers of smartphones and the systems that run on the phones to do more to protect consumers from cell-phone thefts. He says in too many cases, the thefts are violent.