sexism | WAMC

sexism

American politics are obsessed with sex and religion has been wound up in these political struggles, and blamed for not a little of the resistance to meaningful change in America political life.

In "The Sex Obsession," Janet R. Jakobsen examines how gender and sexuality have reappeared time and again at the center of political life, marked by a series of widely recognized issues and movements.

In "The Hunting of Hillary," Pulitzer prize winning political reporter Michael D’Antonio details the years of lies and insults heaped upon Hillary Clinton as she pursued a life devoted to politics and policy. The worst took the form of sexism and misogyny, much of it barely disguised.

A pioneer for women, Clinton was burdened in ways no man ever was. Defined by a right-wing conspiracy, she couldn’t declare what was happening lest she be cast as weak and whiny. Nevertheless, she persisted and wouldn't let them define her.

As "The Hunting of Hillary" makes clear, her achievements have been all the more remarkable for the unique opposition she encountered. The 2016 presidential election can only be understood in the context of the primal and primitive response of those who just couldn’t imagine that a woman might lead.

9/10/20 Panel

Sep 10, 2020

 

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Peabody and Emmy Award-winning journalist Linda Ellerbee, immigration attorney and associate with the Albany law firm of Whiteman Osterman & Hanna, Cianna Freeman-Tolbert, and Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler.

Kate Manne is known for coining the term “himpathy,” popularized in her New York Times piece on the Kavanaugh hearings, and has become a leading voice on how sexism and misogyny manifest in our politics. Her new book is "Entitled: How Male Privilege Hurts Women."

In the book, Manne exposes how male entitlement works in tandem with misogyny, himpathy, and other oppressive systems to produce unjust, perverse, and sometimes bizarre outcomes. Manne’s analysis of our current culture illustrates the extent of male entitlement’s hold on our society.

Melanie Joy, PhD, EdM, is a Harvard-educated psychologist, international speaker, and organizational and relationship coach.

In her newest book, "Powerarchy: Understanding the Psychology of Oppression for Social Transformation" Joy examines the common underlying psychology that drives all oppressive systems and enables abusive interpersonal dynamics.

Overcoming obstacles such as sexism and discrimination by male artists, art critics, and art dealers, a group of fearless women including Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, and Joan Mitchell made careers for themselves by embracing avant-garde painting.

"Heroines of Abstract Expressionism," now open at Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, New York offers visitors a special glimpse of a one-of-a-kind private collection of paintings, works on paper, and sculpture by women artists who pioneered Abstract Expressionism in the United States during the 1940s and 1950s.

Organized by the Fenimore, this major exhibition consists of over 30 works from the Richard P. Friedman and Cindy Lou Wakefield collection featuring objects that are both visually mesmerizing and technically complex. Richard Friedman joins us this morning along with Fenimore Director of Exhibitions, Chris Rossi.

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey are investigative reporters at the New York Times. Their new book is "She Said."

For many years, reporters had tried to get to the truth about Harvey Weinstein’s treatment of women. Rumors of wrongdoing had long circulated. But in 2017, when Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey began their investigation into the prominent Hollywood producer for the New York Times, his name was still synonymous with power.

Nothing could have prepared Kantor and Twohey for what followed the publication of their initial Weinstein story on October 5, 2017. Within days, a veritable Pandora’s box of sexual harassment and abuse was opened. Women all over the world came forward with their own traumatic stories.

Twohey has focused much of her attention on the treatment of women and children, and, in 2014, as a reporter with Reuters News, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting. She shared numerous honors for breaking the Harvey Weinstein story, including a George Polk Award, and the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. She joined us.

 Lauren Wilkinson earned an MFA in fiction and literary translation from Columbia University, and has taught writing at Columbia and the Fashion Institute of Technology. She was a 2013 Center for Fiction Emerging Writers Fellow, and has also received support from the MacDowell Colony and the Djerassi Resident Artists Program.

In her debut novel, "American Spy," it's 1986, the heart of the Cold War, and Marie Mitchell is an intelligence officer with the FBI. She’s brilliant, but she’s also a young black woman working in an old boys’ club. Her career has stalled out, she’s overlooked for every high-profile squad, and her days are filled with monotonous paperwork. So when she’s given the opportunity to join a shadowy task force aimed at undermining Thomas Sankara, the charismatic revolutionary president of Burkina Faso whose Communist ideology has made him a target for American intervention, she says yes.

Brendan Kiely is the New York Times bestselling author of "All American Boys" (with Jason Reynolds), "The Last True Love Story," and "The Gospel of Winter." His work has been published in ten languages, received a Coretta Scott King Author Honor Award, the Walter Dean Myers Award, the Amelia Elizabeth Walden Award, was twice awarded Best Fiction for Young Adults by the American Library Association, and was a Kirkus Reviews Best Books of 2014.

His new novel, "Tradition," explores the insidious nature of tradition at a prestigious boarding school. He will be at Oblong Books in Rhinebeck, New York on June 10 in a Hudson Valley YA Society event with Marisha Pessl.

Patricia O’Toole is the author of "When Trumpets Call: Theodore Roosevelt after the White House," and "The Five of Hearts: An Intimate Portrait of Henry Adams and His Friends," which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

Her latest book, "The Moralist: Woodrow Wilson and the World He Made," is a biography of one of the most high-minded, consequential, and controversial US presidents, Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924). "The Moralist" is a cautionary tale about the perils of moral vanity and American overreach in foreign affairs.

For decades, actress and director Christine Lahti has captivated the hearts and minds of her audience through iconic roles in "Chicago Hope," "Running on Empty," "Housekeeping," "And Justice for All," "Swing Shift," "Law & Order: Special Victims Unit," "God of Carnage," and "The Blacklist." Now, in "True Stories from an Unreliable Eyewitness," this acclaimed performer channels her creativity inward to share her own story for the first time on the page.

In this poignant essay collection, Lahti focuses on three major periods of her life: her childhood, her early journey as an actress and activist, and the realities of her life as a middle-aged woman in Hollywood today.

Sexual harassment and gender discrimination have been met with a grassroots response in the #MeToo moment. In this climate, WNYC is presenting "Beyond #MeToo," four one-hour conversations focused on what we need to do as a society to remedy widespread sexual harassment.

The four-part broadcast will cover the workplace, corrective responses, how we are raising and educating our children in this environment and how men can play a role in the solution.

The guests and their perspectives will be extremely broad and diverse. Listeners can expect to hear from teens and parents, politicians and artists, corporate leaders and blue-collar workers.

The series will air from January 23-26 at 11AM during the Roundtable next week. Jami Floyd is the Host Of "All Things Considered” for WNYC Radio and will be hosting the first night of four national roundtables called “Beyond #MeToo.” She joins us with a preview. 

The series will air from January 23-26 at 11AM during The Roundtable next week. 

 Melissa DeRosa Secretary to New York State Governor Andrew M. Cuomo
berkeleycollege.edu

The senior adviser to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says she has experienced repeated sexism and harassment during her career — including an inappropriate sexual comment from someone who is now a national leader in progressive politics.

  For the past three years, Jon Ronson has travelled the world meeting recipients of high-profile public shamings. The shamed are people like us - people who, say, made a joke on social media that came out badly, or made a mistake at work. Once their transgression is revealed, collective outrage circles with the force of a hurricane and the next thing they know they're being torn apart by an angry mob, jeered at, demonized, sometimes even fired from their job.

Jon Ronson's book, So You've Been Publicly Shamed is now out in paperback.

  Before Hannah from Girls, and Anastasia Steele from 50 Shades of Grey, and Carrie Bradshaw from Sex and the City, there was Isadora Wing -the uninhibited outspoken protagonist of Erica Jong’s revolutionary novel Fear of Flying.

It caused a national sensation fueling fantasies, igniting debates about women and sex, introducing a notorious phrase into the English language. Now 40 years later Fear of Flying has inspired and shocked millions of readers.

In honor of its 40 year anniversary the book is being re-released in two beautiful editions, one hard cover and the other a classic paperback.