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secrets

Book cover art for "Raceless" by Georgia Lawton
Harper Collins

From The Guardian’s Georgina Lawton comes "Raceless," a moving examination of how racial identity is constructed through the author’s own journey grappling with secrets and stereotypes, having been raised by white parents with no explanation as to why she looked black.

In the aftermath of her father’s death and propelled to action by her grief, Georgina decided to unravel the truth about her parentage and the racial identity her family had long denied her. She left England and the strained dynamics of her home life to live in black communities around the world. It was in these countries that Georgina was able to explore her identity and learn what it meant to navigate the world as a black woman.

Book cover for Hieroglyphics
Provided: Algonquin Books

Jill McCorkle’s latest novel “Hieroglyphics” has been called a triumph, one that explores the physical and emotional imprints that make up a life. It reveals the difficulty of ever really knowing the intentions and dreams and secrets of the people who raised you.

Book cover - Inheritance

In the spring of 2016, through a genealogy website to which she had whimsically submitted her DNA for analysis, Dani Shapiro received the stunning news that her father was not her biological father. She woke up one morning and her entire history crumbled beneath her.

Inheritance is a book about secrets: secrets within families, kept out of shame or self-protectiveness; secrets we keep from one another in the name of love. It is the story of a woman's urgent quest to unlock the story of her own identity, a story that has been scrupulously hidden from her for more than fifty years, years she had spent writing brilliantly, and compulsively, on themes of identity and family history.

Dani Shapiro is the author of the memoirs "Hourglass," "Still Writing," "Devotion," and "Slow Motion" and five novels including "Black & White" and "Family History." She will be part of Oblong Books and Music White Hart Speaker Series on March 19 at 6 p.m.

Paul Thornley, Noma Dumezweni, Jamie Parker, Sam Clemmett, Poppy Miller, Alex Price, and Anthony Boyle
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child” opened in London in 2016 and on Broadway this past summer. The story begins nineteen years after the events of J. K. Rowling’s final Harry Potter book, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows” and follows the boy-now-a-family-man wizard and his son, Albus Severus Potter, as the latter begins his education at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Albus is a bit stooped from living in the shadow of his famous father.

There’s magic to do in the acclaimed and oft-awarded two-part theatrical experience and the production asks audience members not to give anything away. The script is available, so one could know the plot before attending but there are effects, tricks, and swirls of secrets we are implored to keep.

The production features an original score by Imogen Heap which is available from Masterworks Broadway today.

We are joined by Sam Clemmett who plays Albus. He originated the role in London and now plays it on Broadway.

Peter Golden
http://www.petergolden.com

Peter Golden is the author of the new novel, "Nothing Is Forgotten," about a young man from New Jersey who travels to Khrushchev’s Russia, where he discovers love and the long-buried secrets of his heritage.

Golden’s previous novels include "Wherever There Is Light" and "Comeback Love." An award-winning journalist, Golden has interviewed many world leaders, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Henry Kissinger, Yitzhak Rabin, and Mikhail Gorbachev.

Golden will be joined by first-time novelist Sara Nović for a pair of New York State Writers Institute events on April 17.  The events are cosponsored by UAlbany’s Disability Resource Center, State Education Department’s Office of Cultural Education, and Friends of the New York State Library

  Secrets, large and small, are a fact of human life. The new book, Secrets & Lies, explores the impact of keeping secrets; how they can damage our sense of self, jeopardize relationships and also the healing power of truth.

Author Jane Isay has found, people survive learning the most disturbing facts that have been hidden from them. And secret keepers are relieved when they finally reveal themselves--and things they are ashamed of--to the people they care about. Much depends, Isay writes, on the way of telling and the way of hearing.