revival

The Secret City Art Revival in Woodstock, New York is a weekend of art, community and celebration throughout the town. This year’s event is entitled “Back to The Garden.”

Events take place July 25-28 and include parties, concerts, puppeteer-led hat-making; house events that include poetry readings, jazz house concerts, site-specific dances, art salons; brunch, karaoke, a Community Processional and – the culminating event – The Artistic Tent Revival.

The Secret City is an Obie Award winning arts organization that programs regularly in New York, Los Angeles, and Woodstock with guest appearances in other parts of the country and a weekly radio show in Kingston, New York.

We are joined by Secret City Founding Artistic Director Chris Wells and Lead designer of the Sunday processional and the Sunday revival Nancy Geaney.

Obie-Award winning performance group, The Secret City, will be making their annual return to Woodstock with the Secret City Art Revival, a weekend festival of site-specific performance, installation, community gathering, parade and artistic tent revival - Thursday, July 26th-Sunday, July 29th, 2018.

Guests for this summer’s revival include Amanda Palmer, puppeteer Paul Zaloom, troubadour Andru Bemis and more. The Secret City Art Revival invites locals and visitors to share in the special creative spirit and the extraordinary cultural legacy of Woodstock. The New York Times calls The Secret City, “Sort of a Salon, Sort of a Church...[it] has grown into a half-irreverent, half-earnest blend of revival meeting and group meditation session.”

Artistic Director and Revival creator Chris Wells; revival committee members: lead artist Nancy Deweir Geaney and Secret City Singer Jess Lunt join us.

 As a young medical student, Dr. David Casarett was inspired by the story of a two-year-old girl named Michelle Funk. Michelle fell into a creek and was underwater for over an hour. When she was found she wasn’t breathing, and her pupils were fixed and dilated. That drowning should have been fatal. But after three hours of persistent work, a team of doctors and nurses was able to bring her back. It was a miracle.

If Michelle could come back after three hours of being dead, what about twelve hours? Or twenty-four? What would it take to revive someone who had been frozen for one thousand years? And what does blurring the line between “life” and “death” mean for society? In Shocked, Casarett chronicles his exploration of the cutting edge of resuscitation and reveals just how far science has come.