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relationships

Book cover for "These Violent Delights"
Harper

Micah Nemerever studied art history and queer theory at the University of Connecticut, where he wrote his MA thesis on gender anxiety in the art of the Weimar Republic.

In his debut novel, "These Violent Delights," Paul enters university in early 1970s Pittsburgh with the hope of moving past the recent death of his father. Sensitive, insecure, and incomprehensible to his grieving family, Paul feels isolated and alone. When he meets the worldly Julian in his freshman ethics class, Paul is immediately drawn to his classmate’s effortless charm.

But as charismatic as he can choose to be, Julian is also volatile and capriciously cruel, and Paul becomes increasingly afraid that he can never live up to what Julian expects of him. As their friendship spirals into all-consuming intimacy, they each learn the lengths to which the other will go in order to stay together, their obsession ultimately hurtling them toward an act of irrevocable violence.

Provided - Harper

John Kim is known as “The Angry Therapist.” His new book looks to how to prioritize your relationship with yourself and live a more meaningful life, whether you’re alone, dating, or even with a partner. 

In his own life, John experienced failed relationships and a bitter divorce. In order to end that cycle, he decided to lean into singlehood. In "Single. On Purpose." Kim guides, from being alone and lonely to alone and fulfilled. 

Book cover artwork for "Social Chemistry"
Dutton / Dutton

Human connection has become even more digital in 2020 due to social distancing measures and other pandemic precautions. Despite this major shift: personal and professional networks have arguably become more important than ever before. How can we reap their benefits?

In the new book, "Social Chemistry: Decoding the Patterns of Human Connection," Marissa King, a pioneer in the field of networks and social relationships, reveals how the quality and structure of your real-life network have the greatest power to transform your life and strengthen your relationships.

King has studied what people's social networks look like, how they evolve, and why that's significant for the last fifteen years. She demonstrates how you can apply her many years of cutting-edge research and insights to your own life.

Book cover for "Anchors in the Storm"
Jessica Laurel Kane

Jessica Laurel Kane’s "Anchors in the Storm" is a short story about hopelessness, loss, and grief but somehow finding strength and courage from the people who reach out to you in times of despair. The story is filled with illustrations and meaningful messages. This story intends to encourage and give hope, perfect for children and families experiencing hurt and sorrow.

Jessica Laurel Kane is the author-illustrator of five books for children: "The Butterfly Who Was Afraid to Fly and Other Stories," "Feed It to the Worms," "A Book of Hearts," and "The Girl Who Was Born with Glue in Her Brain." She has worked as a stop-motion animator, a special effects make-up artist on Broadway for such shows as Beauty and the Beast and The Lion King, and as a commissioned sculptor.

Book cover for "Monogamy" by Sue Miller
Harper Collins / harpercollins.com

  New York Times bestselling author Sue Miller's insightful new novel, focuses on marriage, love, family, happiness and sorrow.  "Monogamy" is the story of Annie and Graham, happily married for 30 years. But after Graham dies suddenly, Annie discovers he was having an affair.

The new book, "A Wonderful Life," is a series of essays that explore the notion of what brings significance to our existences, clarifying why we have this longing beyond the present moment and an insatiable dissatisfaction with where we are, scholar Frank Martela tackles the subject of finding meaning in life.

Bestselling author Caroline Leavitt’s latest, "With or Without You," tells the story of Stella. When she wakes from a coma she develops an uncanny ability to draw and identify everyone’s innermost feelings. Her husband and best friend, who bonded during her illness, may have formed a new relationship as she lay sleeping.

Marlo Thomas and Phil Donahue will be in conversation with Joe Donahue tonight at 7 in a virtual event presented by Northshire Bookstore.   

Today marks their 40th wedding anniversary of actress Marlo Thomas and daytime talk trailblazer Phil Donahue - the couple joined us from their home to talk about their new book what makes a marriage last.

It features reflections from celebrity couples including Ron and Cheryl Howard, Kira Sedgwick and Kevin Bacon, Jimmy and Rosalyn Carter, and Jane Wagner and Lily Tomlin just to name a few.

What makes a marriage last? Well, to unlock that mystery Marlo and Phil crisscrossed the country and conducted intimate conversations with 40 celebrated couples whose long marriages they've admired - from award winning actors, athletes, and newsmakers to writers, comedians, musicians, a former US President and First Lady - through these conversations Marlo and Phil also reveal the rich journey of their own marriage.

You might think that perfect harmony is the defining characteristic of healthy relationships, but the truth is that human interactions are messy, complicated, and confusing.

According to renowned psychologist Ed Tronick and pediatrician Claudia Gold, that is not only okay, it is actually crucial to our social and emotional development. In their new book "The Power of Discord," they show how working through the inevitable dissonance of human connection is the path to better relationships with romantic partners, family, friends, and colleagues.

They say, working through the volley of mismatch and repair in everyday life helps us form deep, lasting, trusting relationships, resilience in times of stress and trauma, and a solid sense of self in the world.

Author photo of Jacqueline Woodson and book cover for "Red at the Bone"
Author photo by Tiffany A. Bloomfield

Jacqueline Woodson is the New York Times-bestselling and National Book Award-winning author of "Another Brooklyn" and "Brown Girl Dreaming."

Her latest novel, "Red at the Bone," tells how an unexpected teenage pregnancy pulls together two families from different social classes, and exposes the private hopes, disappointments, and longings that can bind or divide us from each other.

Hayim Herring, PhD, is an author, presenter and nonprofit organizational futurist, with a specialty in faith-based communities. A former congregational rabbi and “C-suite” nonprofit executive, Hayim blends original research and real-world experience to inspire individuals and organizations to achieve their greatest impact.

Social isolation, loneliness, and suicide are conditions we often associate with the elderly. But in reality, these issues have sharply increased across younger generations. Baby Boomers, Gen X’ers, Millennials, and post-Millennials all report a declining number of friends and an increasing number of health issues associated with loneliness. In his book, "Connecting Generations," Hayim Herring focuses on how Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials perceive one another and looks underneath the generational labels that compound isolation. 

"The Dark Eclipse" is a book of personal essays in which author A.W. Barnes seeks to come to terms with the suicide of his older brother, Mike. Using source documentation: the police report, autopsy, suicide note, and death certificate, the essays explore Barnes’ relationship with Mike and their status as gay brothers raised in a large conservative family in the Midwest.

In addition, the narrative traces the brothers’ difficult relationship with their father, a man who once studied to be a Trappist monk before marrying and fathering eight children. Because of their shared sexual orientation, Andrew hoped he and Mike would be close, but their relationship was as fraught as the author’s relationship with his other brothers and father. While the rest of the family seems to have forgotten about Mike, who died in 1993, Barnes has not been able to let him go. This book is his attempt to do so.

All social relations are laden with power. Getting out from under dominant power relations and mastering power dynamics is perhaps the most essential skill for change agents across all sectors seeking to ignite positive change in the world.

Cyndi Suarez is the author of "The Power Manual: How to Master Complex Power Dynamic," an action manual that explores major concepts of power, with a focus on the dynamics of domination and liberation, and presents methods for shifting power relations and enacting freedom.

Author of "Object of My Affection," Stephen McCauley‘s new novel, "My Ex-Life," is about a formerly married couple who haven’t seen each other in decades.

Over the course of the story, we find out what happens when they find themselves living together again.

James J. Sexton is a trial lawyer with two decades of experience negotiating and litigating high-conflict divorces.

In his new book, "If You're in My Office, It's Already Too Late: A Divorce Lawyer's Guide to Staying Together," he uses his years of experience and observation to reverse engineer relationships and to identify and fix what does not work.

Celebrated and bestselling author of "The Imperfectionists," Tom Rachman has set his sights on a new subject - artists, in his new novel, "The Italian Teacher," about the son of a great painter striving to create his own legacy.

Pinch Bavinsky, son of the world-famous painter Bear Bavinksy, is an aspiring artist living in the shadow of his famous father, struggling to build a legacy of his own. Rachman explores the tension between the creative life and family life through Pinch’s most important relationships.

Daphne de Marneffe, PhD, is a psychologist and the author of "Maternal Desire: On Children, Love, and the Inner Life." In her clinical practice, she offers psychotherapy to couples and individuals. She teaches and lectures widely on marriage, couple therapy, adult development, and parenthood. 

In her new book, "The Rough Patch: Marriage and the Art of Living Together," she explores the pushes and pulls of midlife marriage, where an individual's need to develop can crash headlong into the demands of a relationship.

In The All-Or-Nothing MarriageHow The Best Marriages Work, renowned relationship expert and Northwestern University professor, Eli Finkel shows that the best marriages today are better than the best marriages of earlier eras. In fact, they are the best marriages the world has ever known.

Finkel reverse engineers the best marriages to better understand the new modern marriage, and shows how any marriage can be better. What does a modern marriage look like? And how can today’s couples seek personal fulfillment in a marriage while remaining committed to it for the long run?

Finkel first introduced this idea in a popular 2014 New York Times op-ed of the same name. Divorce rates may be down from their 1980s peak, but so is general marital happiness, which is what Finkel’s “All-or-Nothing” theory can change in a big way.  

In Why Won't You Apologize?: Healing Big Betrayals and Everyday Hurts, renowned psychologist and bestselling author of The Dance of Anger sheds new light on the two most important words in the English language - I’m sorry - and offers a unique perspective on the challenge of healing broken connections and restoring trust.

Dr. Harriet Lerner has been studying apologies—and why some people won’t give them—for more than two decades. Now she offers compelling stories and solid theory that bring home how much the simple apology matters and what is required for healing when the hurt we’ve inflicted (or received) is far from simple.

Dr. Tasha Eurich is an organizational psychologist, researcher, New York Times best-selling author. She is also the founder of the Eurich Group, where she’s helped thousands of leaders and teams improve their effectiveness through greater self-awareness. Dr. Eurich contributes to The Huffington Post and Entrepreneur Magazine and has been featured in outlets like ForbesThe New York Times, CNBC, Fast Company, and Inc..

Research shows that self-awareness – knowing who we are and how others see us – is the foundation for high performance, smart choices, and lasting relationships. Without it, it’s impossible to master the skills needed to succeed in business and life: skills like emotional intelligence and empathy, influence and persuasion, communication and collaboration.

Dr. Tasha Eurich's new book is Insight: Why We're Not as Self-Aware as We Think, and How Seeing Ourselves Clearly Helps Us Succeed at Work and in Life.

Can one person know another person? How do we live through other people? Is it possible to fill the gap between people? If not, can art fill that gap?

Grappling with these questions, David Shields gives us Other People: Takes & Mistakes, a book that is something of a revelation: seventy-plus essays, written over the last thirty-five years, reconceived and recombined to form neither a miscellany nor a memoir but a sustained meditation on otherness. The book is divided into five sections: Men, Women, Athletes, Performers, Alter Egos.

  Jonathan Coulton is a singer-songwriter, fan-cruise operator, public radio one-man-house-band, and internet personality -- if in fact that is still a thing. In 2005 the Yale educated computer programmer, pledged to release one song per week for a year to prove to himself that he could produce creative output to a deadline and to see whether a professional artist could use the Internet and Creative Commons to support himself. A hair more than a decade -- and a good many musical adventures -- later, Coulton is releasing a new full-length album, Solid State, tomorrow on SuperEgo records.

SuperEgo records is Aimee Mann’s label, and Jonathan Coulton is opening for her on tour - in support of the Solid State release and that of her new album, Mental Illness.  When the tour was at The Egg in Albany, NY earlier this week, Coulton came by the studio to talk about the concept album, its companion graphic novel (written by Matt Fraction and drawn by Albert Monteys), NPR’s Ask Me Another, and The Spongebob Musical.

Orli Auslander grew up in London and worked as a milliner and radio DJ in New York City before devoting herself full-time to creating art. Her work has been shown in the US, England and Spain, and was recently featured on the Showtime series Happyish.

Her new book, I Feel Bad: All Day. Every Day. About Everything., is a series of 100 illustrations with accompanying text. She captures a mood and emotional ambivalence that will be all too familiar for readers: trying to be the best wife, mother, and friend she can be, while simultaneously feeling badly about virtually everything she does. 

Orli Auslander will have a book party at The Golden Notebook in Woodstock, NY this Friday at 6 p.m. 

Since antiquity, one story has stood at the center of every conversation about men and women. One couple has been the battleground for human relationships and sexual identity. That couple is Adam and Eve. Yet instead of celebrating them, history has blamed them for bringing sin, deceit, and death into the world.

Author Bruce Feiler is known for books that explore the import in our own lives of our culture’s foundational stories. His bestsellers Walking the Bible and Abraham explored our shared ancestors and engaged people of all backgrounds in open conversation during a time of discord and fear. Feiler is also the host of the PBS series Walking the Bible and Sacred Journeys with Bruce Feiler.

In his new book, The First Love Story: Adam, Eve and Us - Feiler looks to redeem history’s first couple and explains the many ways we’ve scapegoated Eve, and elevates these founding figures to their rightful place, he believes, as role models for unity and forgiveness. 

In What Love Is, philosopher Carrie Jenkins offers a bold new theory on the nature of romantic love that reconciles its humanistic and scientific components. Love can be a social construct (the idea of a perfect fairy tale romance) and a physical manifestation (those anxiety- inducing heart palpitations); we must recognize its complexities and decide for ourselves how to love.

Motivated by her own polyamorous relationships, she examines the ways in which our parameters of love have recently changed-to be more accepting of homosexual, interracial, and non-monogamous relationships-and how they will continue to evolve in the future. 

Hidden anger that comes out indirectly can undermine relationships between friends, family, and colleagues. When people feel compelled to conceal their true beliefs and emotions, there can be serious physical and psychological results for everyone involved.

In Overcoming Passive-Aggression, Revised Edition: How to Stop Hidden Anger from Spoiling Your Relationships, Career, and Happiness, Dr. Tim Murphy and Loriann Oberlin offer a clear definition of passive aggression and show readers not only how to end the behavior but also how to avoid falling victim to other people's hidden anger.

  Daniel Shapiro, Ph.D., is founder and director of the Harvard International Negotiation Program and a world-renowned expert on conflict resolution. From advising leaders of war-torn countries to working with senior executives and families in crisis, Dan has helped thousands of organizations and individuals solve the problems that divide us. Drawing on these experiences and his practice-based research, he has developed a wealth of practical approaches to amplify influence and leadership—in business, in government, and in life.

His new book is Negotiating the Nonnegotiable: How to Resolve Your Most Emotionally Charged Conflicts.

  After four decades as a reporter, Lesley Stahl’s most vivid and transformative experience of her life was not covering the White House, interviewing heads of state, or researching stories at 60 Minutes. It was becoming a grandmother.

She was hit with a jolt of joy so intense and unexpected, she wanted to “investigate” it—as though it were a news flash. And so, using her60 Minutes skills, she explored how grandmothering changes a woman’s life.

Her new book is Becoming Grandma: The Joys and Science of the New Grandparenting.

     When Clara Bensen arranged to meet Jeff Wilson on the steps of the Texas State Capital after just a few email exchanges on OkCupid, it felt like something big was going to happen. Jeff was a wildly energetic university professor with a free willing spirit, Clara, a sensitive reclusive writer just recovering from a quarter life existential breakdown.

Within a few days of knowing one another they decided to embark on a crazy travel experiment. Twenty-one days from Istanbul to London with zero luggage, zero reservations and zero plans. Based on Clara Bensen’s viral Salon.com article entitled "The Craziest OkCupid Date Ever," her new book  No Baggage: A Minimalist Tale of Love and Wandering is the story of her luggage less adventure. 

  In his new book, The Point Is: Making Sense of Birth, Death, and Everything in Between, Lee Eisenberg (bestselling author of The Number) dares to tackle nothing less than what it takes to find enduring meaning and purpose in life.

He explains how from a young age, each of us is compelled to take memories of events and relationships and shape them into a one-of-a-kind personal narrative. In addition to sharing his own memories, Eisenberg presents research culled from psychology and neuroscience, and draws on insights from a pantheon of thinkers and great writers-Tolstoy, Freud, Joseph Campbell, Virginia Woolf, among others -- as well as men and women of all ages who are wrestling with the demands of work and family, ever in search of fulfillment and satisfaction.

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