racisim | WAMC

racisim

4/13/20 Panel

Apr 13, 2020

        The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany adjunct professor Rosemary Armao, Assistant Professor at Albany Law school Ciji Dodds, and Ibram X. Kendi , the New York Times bestselling author of "Stamped from the Beginning," which won the National Book Award for Nonfiction, and "How to be an Antiracist." He is a professor of history and international relations and the founding director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University. One of America's leading antiracist voices, Dr. Kendi is also a columnist at The Atlantic.

An old rap album has become a flashpoint in the race for New York’s 19th House district seat. 

In today’s Congressional Corner, Republican John Faso explains his issue with Democrat Antonio Delgado’s rap lyrics in an interview with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Jorge Ramos, an Emmy award-winning journalist, Univision’s longtime anchorman and widely considered the “voice of the voiceless” within the Latino community, was forcefully removed from an Iowa press conference in 2015 by then-candidate Donald Trump after trying to ask about his plans on immigration.

His new book is "Stranger: The Challenge of a Latino Immigrant in the Trump Era."

  Ever since Donald Trump entered the presidential race—in a press conference attended by paid actors, in which he slandered Mexican immigrants—he has dominated headlines, becoming the unrestrained id at the center of one of the most bizarre and alarming elections in American history.

It was not always so. In 1996, longtime New Yorker writer Mark Singer was conscripted by his editor to profile Donald Trump. At that time Trump was a mere Manhattan-centric megalomaniac, a failing casino operator mired in his second divorce and (he claimed) recovering from the bankruptcy proceedings that prompted him to inventory the contents of his Trump Tower home. 

In Trump and Me, Singer revisits the profile and recounts how its publication lodged inside its subject’s head as an enduring irritant—and how Singer (“A TOTAL LOSER!” according to Trump) cheerfully continued to bait him.

  The new book Clean and White offers a history of environmental racism in the U.S., focusing on constructions of race and hygiene. In the wake of the civil war as the nation encountered emancipation, mass immigration and the growth of an urbanized society, Americans began to conflate the ideas of race and waste.

Carl Zimring draws on historical evidence from statesmen, scholars, sanitarians, novelists, activists, advertisements and the U.S. census of population to reveal changing constructions of environmental racism.  Carl Zimring is associate professor of sustainability studies in the department of social science and cultural studies at the Pratt Institute. 

     In the decades after the landmark Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision, busing to achieve school desegregation became one of the nation’s most controversial civil rights issues. 

Audio Pending...

  The new book Why Busing Failed examines the pitched battles over busing on a national scale focusing on cities such as Boston, Chicago, New York and Pontiac, Michigan. The book shows how school officials, politicians, the courts and the media disregarded the rights of black students and gave precedents to the desires white parents who opposed desegregation. Why Busing Failed is authored by Matthew Delmont, Associate Professor of History at Arizona State University.

  For the past three years, Jon Ronson has travelled the world meeting recipients of high-profile public shamings. The shamed are people like us - people who, say, made a joke on social media that came out badly, or made a mistake at work. Once their transgression is revealed, collective outrage circles with the force of a hurricane and the next thing they know they're being torn apart by an angry mob, jeered at, demonized, sometimes even fired from their job.

Jon Ronson's book, So You've Been Publicly Shamed is now out in paperback.

http://www.murphy.senate.gov/newsroom/photos

  Anger, hurt, exasperation — the emotions in Charleston after the recent shooting are familiar in our region.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that it’s past time for reform.

  In the new book: So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed, Jon Ronson investigates the world of public shaming, where social media has made everyone a vigilante and where a poorly phrased tweet or comment can catapult a person to Public Enemy No. 1 overnight.

Shaming moves with lighting speed and has a terrifyingly powerful effect, sometimes destroying a person’s entire life. Ronson follows up with those whose lives have been left in tatters, and questions those being most cruel in the anonymous internet playground, resulting in a powerful and very humane dispatch from the front line of the escalating war on human nature and its flaws.

Jon Ronson’s books include the New York Times bestsellers The Psychopath Test, Them: Adventures with Extremists and The Men Who Stare at Goats.

  Sharon Draper is a teacher and a writer, with several awards for her work in both fields. She has written several books for young readers and her latest is: Stella By Starlight.

The book is set in the depression in the segregated South, and deals with young people coming face-to-face with the Ku Klux Klan and prejudice.

Sharon Draper joins us this morning to talk about her new book and her own life experiences with prejudice.

On this One-Hundreth anniversary of the ‘Yuletide Peace, undeclared but observed by ordinary soldiers on both sides of the field of slaughter, in World War I, this grizzled but grateful, WWII Veteran turned ‘Pundit,’ thought it an apt time to examine our progress toward a peaceful and permissive world or the lack of one…, and try to fathom, why not?