poem

  This week's Book Picks from Lily Bartels at The Open Door Bookstore and Gift Gallery in Schenectady, NY.

List:
"Inheritance: A Memoir of Genealogy, Paternity, and Love" by Dani Shapiro
"Never Home Alone: The Natural History of Where We Live" by Rob Dunn
"The Dakota Winters" by Tom Barbash
"After Emily: Two Remarkable Women and the Legacy of America's Greatest Poet" by Julie Dobrow
"The Travelling Cat Chronicles" by Hiro Arikawa
"Sing a Song of Seasons: A Nature Poem for Each Day of the Year" by Nosy Crow and Fiona Waters

Djelloul Marbrook is the author of ten poetry books and ten fiction books. He has won the Stan & Tom Wick Poetry Prize, the International Book Award in poetry, and the Literal Latté fiction award for "Artist's Hill."

His poetry and fiction has been widely published in journals and anthologies. He lives in the mid-Hudson Valley and had a long newspaper career including stints at the Providence (RI) Journal, the Elmira (NY) Star-Gazette, the Baltimore Sun, and the Washington Star.

His new poetry volume – “The Seas Are Dolphins’ Tears” is just out - as is his trilogy of novels.

Jessica Hornik will be reading and signing "A Door on the River: Poems" at three events over the next few weeks. She will be at the Book House of Stuyvesant Plaza in Albany, New York tonight, at Russell Sage in Troy, New York on October 25, and she will participate in the Volume Reading Series at Spotty Dog Books and Ale in Hudson, New York on November 10.

In her first book, Hornik’s poems carry power rooted in nature, place, and family. "A Door on the River" marks the emergence of a beautiful, confident voice in the landscape of American poetry. Jessica Hornik was born in Albany and was raised in Clifton Park. She earned degrees from Cornell and New York University.

“The Children Are Reading” is a new collection of poetry by Gabriel Fried that takes readers into the magically dark and twisted worlds of children’s literature and children’s imaginations, as well as the fearful fantasies of the adults who care for them.

Gabriel Fried is the author of "Making the New Lamb Take," winner of the Kathryn Morton Prize, which was named a top poetry collection of 2007 by Foreword Reviews and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. He is also the editor of an anthology, "Heart of the Order: Baseball Poems," and longtime poetry editor of Persea Books. He teaches in the creative writing program at the University of Missouri.

Tyehimba Jess’ poetry serves as a bridge between “slam poetry” and other American verse traditions. His second collection Olio, which celebrates the unrecorded and largely unknown Black musicians and orators of the 19th and early 20th centuries, won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize.

Jay Rogoff is the author of six books of poetry. His latest full-length collection, Enamel Eyes, A Fantasia On Paris, 1870, a lyrical sequence with the breadth and depth of a historical novel, considers the events of "the terrible year" through multiple perspectives.

The Franco-Prussian War, the siege of Paris, and the Commune come alive through the eyes and voices of a variety of historical figures who witnessed and participated in the events.

Jay Rogoff will have a poetry reading on Friday night at the Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga to celebrate his new collection, Enamel Eyes, A Fantasia on Paris, 1870. 

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we check in with Connecticut Humanities to discuss why poetry is important in today's society. Does teaching poetry in our schools really matter in this era of STEM and standardized testing?

We are joined today by Scott Wands, Manager of Grants at Connecticut Humanities who manages Poetry Out Loud in Connecticut, and Susan Ballek, Executive Director and CEO of the Hill-Stead Museum in Farmington, CT, home of the long running Sunken Garden Poetry Festival program.

  One hundred years after its first publication in August 1915, Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken” is so ubiquitous that it’s easy to forget that it is, in fact, a poem.

Widely admired as the poetry columnist for the New York Times Book Review, David Orr deftly illuminates the poem’s enduring greatness while revealing its mystifying contradictions, in The Road Not Taken: Finding America In The Poem Everyone Loves And Almost Everyone Gets Wrong.

Orr examines the poem’s cultural influence, its artistic complexity, and its historical journey from the margins of the First World War all the way to its place today as a true masterpiece of American literature.

      In His Day is Done, Maya Angelou delivers an authentically heartfelt and elegant tribute to the late Nelson Mandela, who stood as David to the mighty Goliath of Apartheid and who, after twenty-seven years of unjust imprisonment on the notorious Robben Island, emerged with “His stupendous heart intact / His gargantuan will / Hale and hearty” to lead his people into a new era.

Maya Angelou joins us to discuss the poem and the loss of a man she feels fortunate to have called a friend.

Listener Essay - It Rained And It Rained

Oct 31, 2008

Jefferson, NY – Tom Clack is a retired sound engineer who lives in Jefferson and occasionally teaches audio at SUNY Oneonta.