PFOA | WAMC

PFOA

WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

New York environmental regulators are looking statewide for potential sites of groundwater contamination from a cancer-causing chemical previously used to make Teflon and other products.

New York environmental regulators are looking statewide for potential sites of groundwater contamination from a cancer-causing chemical previously used to make Teflon and other products.

A bill designed to provide legal options to victims of water contamination in their communities has cleared both houses of the New York state legislature.

  Hoosick Falls residents, worried about PFOA in their water systems and in their blood, according to recent tests, came to the capitol in Albany on Wednesday to demand hearings on the Cuomo adminstration's handling of the water crisis. They instead got a meeting with  Governor Andrew Cuomo's director of State Operations, Jim Malatras, after they assembled outside the governor's door.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Months after the state of New York began responding to high levels of a toxic chemical in water supplies in Hoosick Falls, several steps have been taken, including the installation of filtration systems on the village water supply and private wells. But the people of Hoosick Falls are still worried.

Senator Kathy Marchione promotes bill to extend the statute of limitations to sue for toxic contamination, with, right to left, Hoosick Falls resident Michele Baker, Assembly sponsor John McDonald, and Environmental Advocates' Liz Moran
Karen DeWitt

As part of the push to end the legislative session by Thursday, state lawmakers representing the PFOA contaminated village of Hoosick Falls want to extend the statute of limitations to bring lawsuits against polluters.

Photo of a faucet
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

City officials are glad to know that 120 leaks in its water system have been identified and can be repaired, reducing the amount of water being lost as Newburgh continues to face its contamination crisis.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

A Rensselaer County community with contaminated water sources has a new town supervisor.

Two new locations in Vermont have been found to have PFOA and PFOS contamination.

New York State's Health Department says the average level of the toxic chemical PFOA in the blood of 2,000 Hoosick Falls residents was about 10 times that of the general population.

The Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics facility on McCaffrey Street in Hoosick Falls
Lucas Willard / WAMC

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has secured an agreement that holds companies Saint-Gobain and Honeywell responsible for the PFOA contamination in Hoosick Falls and surrounding area.

Rep. Chris Gibson
..:: WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas ::..

Congress has passed a bill that would institute more rigorous oversight of industrial chemicals.

Testing for PFOA in drinking water wells will continue in Bennington and North Bennington, Vermont.

The Nassau town supervisor is calling for additional EPA testing for the manufacturing chemical PFOA at the Dewey Loeffel Superfund site in Rensselaer County.

The Environmental Protection Agency logo
The Environmental Protection Agency

The town supervisor of a Rensselaer County community that is home to a Federal Superfund site is asking the Environmental Protection Agency for additional testing for the chemical PFOA.

The Environmental Protection Agency logo
The Environmental Protection Agency

The industrial chemicals PFOA and PFOS have caused trouble for residents of communities like Hoosick Falls, Newburgh, Petersburgh, and Bennington. Federal officials have advised residents to stop drinking the contaminated water and state governments are still putting measures in place to deliver clean water to residents.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has released new health advisories for PFOA and PFOS, the manufacturing chemicals at the center of water contamination crises in several communities in the region including Hoosick Falls, Petersburgh, and North Bennington. The guidelines released today lower the lifetime exposure from drinking water level to 70 parts per trillion. The level of PFOA in affected areas has been much higher than the new benchmark, leading communities to establish alternate water supplies. High exposure can result in cancer, birth defects and other diseases.

Photo of a faucet
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Saying that since Stewart Airport, specifically the Air National Guard Base, is “the most likely source” of contamination of the City of Newburgh’s water supply, Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney called on the Defense Department to investigate the situation.

Sen. Schumer
WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer is urging the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to update its drinking water guidelines for chemical contaminants recently found in some upstate New York water supplies.

The Vermont Health Department is offering more blood test clinics for Bennington residents who have been exposed to a potentially cancer causing chemical in their drinking water.

The Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics facility on McCaffrey Street in Hoosick Falls
Lucas Willard / WAMC

With residents in the Town of Hoosick and Petersburgh still dealing with compromised drinking water due to the presence of PFOA, Representative Chris Gibson has sent a letter to House Committee on Oversight and Government Chairman Jason Chaffetz asking the committee to investigate the response of state and federal authorities.

With some neighboring communities grappling with PFOA, one Albany County city has tested its drinking water as a precautionary measure. WAMC’s Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard reports the tests came back safe to drink.

The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services has identified more than 40 companies in addition to Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics that likely used a water-contaminating compound in their products.

WAMC, Allison Dunne

A state of emergency declared in the city of Newburgh Monday has been lifted after the city switched to a different water supply. Its usual water source is contaminated with PFOS.

Shumlin: Pittsford Fire Academy Free Of PFOA Pollution

Apr 25, 2016

 

In what is good news for the Vermont Fire Academy in Pittsford, state tests for a toxic chemical in water sources on and around the site have come up with no detectable levels.

WikiMedia Commons

A new chemical contaminant has been found in private wells in the Rensselaer County community of Petersburgh.

The Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics facility on McCaffrey Street in Hoosick Falls
Lucas Willard / WAMC

The CEO of a company that owns plants in three states where elevated levels of a chemical used to make Teflon coatings were found says its priority is providing safe drinking water to residents.

Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin’s office has announced results from surface water testing in Bennington and North Bennington, as state authorities are hoping to determine the source and extent of a chemical contamination.

Office of Governor Andrew Cuomo

The state health department said Wednesday repeated testing of the village of Hoosick Falls water system shows non-detection of perfluorooctanoic acid, and the water is now safe for all uses including cooking and drinking.

Vermont Congressman Peter Welch will visit with state and local officials in Southern Vermont Monday to receive an update on the chemical contamination of private wells.

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