pet

News10 Anchorman, John Gray, is an Emmy Award winning journalist and writer. When John’s puppy, Samuel, died unexpectedly at just six months old it brought a profound sadness to their home and a sense that this was just not fair. For the first time John understood how a child must feel when they lose a pet of any age, asking themselves, “Why?”

Hoping to turn his pain into something positive, John put pen to paper and wrote a story to help any child who has lost a pet. His new book, "God Needed a Puppy" guides children through the grieving process by using friendly animals from the forest to explain the reasons why a beloved pet sometimes has to leave us.

Kim Brophey, CDBC, BA, is a nationally certified and award-winning canine behavior consultant and the owner of Dog Door Behavior Center in Asheville, North Carolina.

Using cutting-edge research, Brophey has developed a groundbreaking system that allows owners to identify what their dog is struggling with, why, and how they can fix it. Brophey's approach is unlike anything that has been published before and will give dog owners a new understanding of what motivates and affects their dog's behavior.

Her book is "Meet Your Dog: The Game-Changing Guide to Understanding Your Dog's Behavior."

Sigrid Nunez’s new novel, “The Friend,” is a moving story of love, friendship, grief, healing, and the magical bond between a woman and her dog.

Nunez’s previous novels include “Salvation City,” “The Last of Her Kind” and “A Feather on the Breath of God.”

Listener Essay - The Rescues

Jan 30, 2018

This listener essay is by Leslie Sittner. She began writing five years ago with her dog, Porsche, as her creative muse, especially on their daily and nightly walks. Her muse was recently put to rest at 17 ½ years old.

The Rescues

After adopting an Irish sight hound, Laura Schenone discovers a remarkable and little-known fight to gain justice for dogs and for all animals. "The Dogs of Avalon" introduces us to the strong-willed Marion Fitzgibbon, born in rural Ireland, where animals are valued only for their utility. But Fitzgibbon believes that suffering is felt by all creatures, and she champions the cause of strays, baffling those around her - including her family - as she and a group of local women rescue any animal in need and taking on increasingly risky missions.

Laura Schenone is an award-winning author who has written "A Thousand Years Over a Hot Stove" ​and "The Lost Ravioli Recipes of Hoboken." Her newest book is "The Dogs of Avalon: The Race to Save Animals in Peril."

William Wegman's whimsical photographs of his Weimaraner dogs have been celebrated in the art world and enjoyed by pet lovers for decades.

In the book William Wegman: Being Human, renowned photography curator William A. Ewing presents more than 300 images from the artist's personal archive, unearthing previously unseen gems alongside the iconic images that have made Wegman - along with dressed-up dogs Man Ray, Fay Ray, and others - beloved worldwide.

William Wegman joins us.

According to our next guest, without volunteers, our nation’s animal shelter system simply would not exist. Volunteers speak for those that cannot speak, pick up the pieces for abandoned animals that have been let down by previous owners or unfortunate circumstances, and do whatever it takes to heal the deepest of wounds.

In his book Finding Shelter, award-winning photographer Jesse Freidin shows the softer side of this story. He witnessed firsthand how many of the volunteers were able to mend their own emotional hurts with the love the shelter animals gave back to them, and how the power of these relationships transforms shelters into places where humans and animals can heal together.

In Finding Shelter, Freidin sparks a new discussion about animal rescue and what it feels like to truly love an animal and we welcome him to the show this morning.

  Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation: Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This week we are joined by Carol Horn and Kathy Sacks from Homeward Bound Dog Rescue.

  Experimental performance artist, composer and musician, Laurie Anderson’s new film, Heart of a Dog, will screen twice as part of FilmColumbia this weekend and will begin a run at Time and Space Limited in Hudson on November 6th.

The film is a meditation on life, perception, and stories. It talks about the loss of a much beloved pet and a less beloved parent. 

  There are thousands of working dogs all over the US and beyond with incredible abilities—they can find missing people, detect drugs and bombs, pinpoint unmarked graves of Civil War soldiers, or even find drowning victims more than two hundred feet below the surface of a lake.

These abilities may seem magical or mysterious, but Cat Warren shows the science, the rigorous training, and the skilled handling that underlie these creatures’ amazing abilities.

    No one brings to life the remarkable bond between humans and their dogs like New York Times bestselling author Jon Katz.

He has gained great readership with enchanting tales and keen observations of his animal menagerie—the dogs, sheep, chickens, and other residents of Bedlam Farm. Now, Katz is back with his new book: The Second Chance Dog: A Love Story.

With his signature insight and gift for storytelling, Katz explores the power of second chances for both people and dogs. Jon Katz joins us this morning to celebrate today’s release of the new book he will be signing and reading from the new book tonight at 7PM at Battenkill Books in Cambridge.