pbs

The Greenwich Free Library and community co-sponsors will be having a special film screening of the PBS documentary "American Creed" in which former US Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice and Pulitzer-Prize winning historian David M. Kennedy come together from different points of view to investigate the idea of a unifying American Creed.

The screening will take place on Wednesday, October 2 at 6:30 p.m. at the Greenwich Central School High School Auditorium. Following the film, Joe Donahue will be leading a panel and community discussion. To talk more about the event and the documentary, we welcome library director, Annie Miller.

The "Woodstock: Three Days That Defined A Generation" poster
"Woodstock: Three Days That Defined A Generation"

America has been looking back on some of the major milestones of 1969 this year. 50 years on, the impact of the moon landing in July and the Woodstock festival in August is still being felt. The three days of peace and music in upstate New York could have been a disaster, with an unready site, untested promoters, and nearly half a million people. Instead, it came and went without any major emergencies — and left some landmark music in its wake.

In 1961, President John F. Kennedy proposed the nation spend twenty billion dollars to land a man on the Moon before the end of the decade.

Based on eyewitness accounts and newly discovered archival material, "Chasing the Moon" by Robert Stone and Alan Andres, reveals for the first time the unknown stories of the fascinating individuals whose imaginative work across several decades culminated in America’s momentous achievement.

More than a story of engineers and astronauts, the moon landing, now celebrating its fiftieth anniversary, grew out of the dreams of science fiction writers, filmmakers, military geniuses, and rule-breaking scientists.

Judy Woodruff
PBS

It has been one non-stop news cycle since the 2016 election, but today is one of the busiest days of all in America’s newsrooms. PBS NewsHour anchor and managing editor Judy Woodruff will be on air starting at 8 tonight as returns start coming in. First, she joined us.

The Great American Read

Sep 20, 2018

The Great American Read on PBS is an eight-part series that explores and celebrates the power of reading, told through the prism of America’s 100 best-loved novels (as chosen in a national survey.) The 100 books have been placed into a bracket and divided into quadrants based on the years they were published: The Classics, Mid-Century, Late Century and Contemporary.

The Great American Read investigates how and why writers create their fictional worlds, how we as readers are affected by these stories, and what these 100 different books have to say about our diverse nation and our shared human experience.

We were joined by Social Media Coordinator at WMHT Danielle Sanzone, Director of the Greenwich Free Library Annie Miller; librarian at Albany Public Library Christina Stenson-Carey; Suzanna Hermans of Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck and Millerton; and Matt Tannenbaum of The Bookstore in Lenox, MA.

Craft beer is on the rise across the country, and New York has been near the center of the revolution. With now over 400 breweries across the state, New York is currently ranked 4th in the country for number of craft breweries. But craft beer is not about mass production; it is about passionate locals employing artisan skills to infuse the values of their community into flavorful and memorable brews.

In each half hour episode of the new PBS show, "Brewed in New York," hosts Matt and Maya travel to a different tourism region of the state, visiting craft breweries and learning how the unique geography, agriculture, and character of the region influences each brewery’s individual story and craft.

Daniel Swinton and Leanne Robinson-Maine are both producers and writers on the show -- which starts airing on WMHT on September 9.

From Academy Award-winning filmmaker Morgan Neville ("20 Feet from Stardom"), "Won’t You Be My Neighbor?" takes an intimate look at America’s favorite neighbor: Mister Fred Rogers.

A portrait of a man whom we all think we know, this emotional and moving film takes us beyond the zip-up cardigans and the land of make-believe, and into the heart of a creative genius who inspired generations of children with compassion and limitless imagination.

The highly anticipated and already much lauded film will be the closing night presentation of this year's Berkshire International Film Festival. BIFF takes place May 31-June 3. Nicholas Ma is a producer on "Won't You Be My Neighbor?" and he joined us to talk about the movie and his relationship with Fred Rogers.

After five years of war in Syria, the remaining citizens of Aleppo are getting ready for a siege. Through the eyes of volunteer rescue workers called the White Helmets, "Last Men in Aleppo" allows viewers to experience the daily life, death, and struggle in the streets, where they are fighting for sanity in a city where war has become the norm.

The film is nominated for a 2018 Academy Award for Best Documentary and is currently available to view on Netflix. It will also air on PBS on March 1. Director, Feras Fayyed, joins us.

Alan Alda At Proctors

Nov 7, 2017

Alan Alda is an actor, director, screenwriter, author and seven-time Emmy Award and Golden Globe Award winner. He is widely known for playing Captain Hawkeye Pierce in the TV series "M*A*S*H," hosting "Scientific American Frontiers," and playing Arnold Vinick on "The West Wing."

A lifelong lover of science, Alda would like everyday people and science to shake hands. Just as he knew to get to a doctor, because of what his body was telling him, Alda believes that people should have an easier time understanding and relating to science. So aside from hosting PBS specials for over two decades, Alda has helped found the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, where scientists learn the communicative skills to help the world understand science better without all the jargon.

Alan Alda will be at Proctors in Schenectady, NY on Thursday, November 9 presenting a program entitled "Getting Beyond A Blind Date with Science."

Jon Else joins us this morning to tell us tell the inside story of Henry Hampton’s 1987 landmark multipart television series Eyes on the Prize, one of the most important and influential TV shows in history.

His new book is True South: Henry Hampton and Eyes on the Prize, the Landmark Television Series That Reframed the Civil Rights Movement. Jon Else was Hampton’s series producer and cinematographer for Eyes on the Prize.

The book focuses on the tumultuous 18 months in 1985 and 1986 when Eyes was created. True South is being published on the 30th anniversary of Eyes’ initial broadcast on PBS, which reached 100 million viewers. 

  PBS NewsHour's Judy Woodruff and Gwen Ifill along with NPR host Rachel Martin are anchoring the special coverage from the GOP National Convention in Cleveland each evening from 8-11 here on WAMC. 

PBS NewsHour Correspondent Lisa Desjarsins joins us from Cleveland to discuss the national political conventions and what the conventions say about the candidates seeking the presidency.

  Chef/restaurateur/cook book author and Emmy-winning host of Public Television’s Lidia's Kitchen and Lidia’s Italy, Lidia Bastianich will be at Proctors in Schenectady, NY this Friday at 8pm.

The best-selling author is a beloved ambassador for Italian culinary traditions throughout the world. Her multiple culinary endeavors have married her two passions in life – her family and food. Her most recent book is  Lidia's Mastering the Art of Italian Cuisine: Everything You Need to Know to be a Great Italian Cook.

  

  April 1975. During the chaotic final days of the Vietnam War, as the North Vietnamese Army closed in on Saigon, South Vietnamese resistance crumbled. City after city and village after village fell to the North while the few U.S. diplomats and military operatives still in the country contemplated withdrawal.

With the lives of thousands of South Vietnamese hanging in the balance, those in control faced an impossible choice--who would go and who would be left behind to face brutality, imprisonment or even death. Directed by Rory Kennedy and airing in conjunction with the 40th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, Last Days in Vietnam premieres on American Experience tomorrow night from 9:00-11:00 p.m. on PBS.

4/22/15 Panel

Apr 22, 2015

    

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Professor, Rosemary Armao, and Editor of The Daily Gazette, Judy Patrick.

Topics include: Baltimore Civil Rights Investigation, DEA Chief Resigns, Loretta Lynch confirmation, Saudi Arabia Halts Bombing, PBS v. Ben Affleck.

  Best known as Ari Gold, the agent you love to hate on HBO's Entourage, Emmy and Golden Globe winner Jeremy Piven has one of Hollywood's coolest and most diverse resumes.

Piven surprised audiences by taking on the title role in the British series, Mr. Selfridge which is about the real-life department store's mogul which airs on Masterpiece on PBS and has its 3rd season premiere this Sunday, March 29th.

  For twenty-five years and counting, Rebecca Eaton has presided over PBS’s Masterpiece, the longest running weekly prime time drama series on American television. Eaton brings to her new memoir, Making Masterpiece, the voices of many of the writers, directors, producers, and other contributors and shares personal anecdotes about her decades-spanning career.

  Whether loving him or hating him, just about everybody had to admit that three-term Mayor Ed Koch was the quintessential New York City politician. He was blunt, funny, combative and shrewd. He was charismatic in a typically uncharismatic New York way.

Visitors walking the city's clean streets and pedestrian plazas today would hardly recognize the New York of the '70s and '80s. Rampant crime, near-bankruptcy, urban blight, graffiti, the AIDS epidemic and racial conflict marked the mayor's tenure.

The new PBS POV documentary Koch is an insider's account that mixes a wealth of archival material with Ed Koch's ruminations and ceaseless political activity through his final years. Koch has its national broadcast premiere on Monday, Sept. 22nd at 10 PM on PBS as part of the 27th season of POV.

      Award winning documentary filmmaker, Ken Burns, will be at the Memorial Hall in Shelburne Falls, MA on February 12 at 7pm to present clips from his new seven-part film The Roosevelts: An Intimate History. The 14 hour film will air on PBS later this year. The event will help the Arms Library raise money for the first phase of a multi-year project to restore the historic Pratt Memorial Library Building. To reserve tickets call 413 625 0306.

“The Roosevelts” weaves together the stories of Theodore, Franklin, and Eleanor Roosevelt – three members of one of the most prominent and influential families in American politics.

Ken Burns has been making films for more than thirty years. Since the Academy Award nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, Ken has gone on to direct and produce some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made, including The Civil War, Baseball, Jazz, The National Parks: America’s Best Idea, The Dust Bowl – and many others.

A mass email urging Capital Region residents to sign a move-on-dot-org petition directed at a local public television station is apparently without merit.

The email begins "Dear Albany MoveOn member" - it's from one Michele Scher, who started a petition on the left-leaning move-on-dot-org website regarding  Citizen Koch, the TV documentary about the Koch brothers and their involvement with the Tea Party, which, according to the petition, has been blocked from airing on WMHT. 

Steve Barrett/NPR

With sequestration now in operation across the country, many facets of federal spending are being curtailed. WAMC’s Alan Chartock caught up with Michael Riksen, Vice President of Policy and Representation at National Public Radio, to discuss the threat to public broadcasting.

Ken Burns' latest PBS series is The Dust Bowl, it chronicles the worst man-made ecological disaster in American history, in which the frenzied wheat boom of the "Great Plow-Up," followed by a decade-long drought during the 1930s nearly swept away the breadbasket of the nation.

El Valador on POV

Sep 26, 2012

Produced by American Documentary Inc. and celebrating its 25th season on PBS; the award-winning POV is the longest running showcase on American television to feature the work of today’s independent documentary filmmakers. Thursday night on PBS, POV presents “El Velador” – The Night Watchman – a film by award winning director, Natalia Almada. El Valador was an official selection of the 2011 canne film festival directors’ fortnight and new directors new films festival.