parents | WAMC

parents

Book cover art for "Raceless" by Georgia Lawton
Harper Collins

From The Guardian’s Georgina Lawton comes "Raceless," a moving examination of how racial identity is constructed through the author’s own journey grappling with secrets and stereotypes, having been raised by white parents with no explanation as to why she looked black.

In the aftermath of her father’s death and propelled to action by her grief, Georgina decided to unravel the truth about her parentage and the racial identity her family had long denied her. She left England and the strained dynamics of her home life to live in black communities around the world. It was in these countries that Georgina was able to explore her identity and learn what it meant to navigate the world as a black woman.

Joe Donahue:  In an isolated estate on the Atlantic coast storms are brewing, waters are rising, and the world as we know it is inexorably shifting. This is the reality of Lydia Millet’s new novel, “A Children's Bible”, where a pack of kids and their middle aged parents are coexisting at this summer estate. The novel turns steadily darker as climate collapse and societal breakdown encroach. Millet is a senior editor at the Center for Biological Diversity, who regularly tackles environmental issues in her op-eds for the “New York Times”. She has long foregrounded the costs of climate change in her fiction, and “A Children's Bible” with scenes of quarantine and societal breakdown is no different. She has written 12 works of fiction including “Sweet Lamb of Heaven”, “Mermaids in Paradise” and “Love in Infant Monkeys”. 

“How can we ensure that our sons are well-prepared and well-launched to manhood?” In the new book, "How to Raise a Boy: The Power of Connection to Raise Good Men," Michael Reichert, uses this fundamental question as a foundation to what we know and what we are missing when it comes to raising our sons.

Dr. Reichert guides readers through decades of research and practical applications toward a new understanding of what boyhood should be and how we, as parents and educators, can prepare boys to be good men.

Parents and educators have a unique opportunity to shift the cultural conversation and create a new paradigm for what it means to raise a boy – one who is kind, respectful, and fundamentally good, rather than the models of abuse, violence, and havoc that seem to dominate the airwaves today.

Harriet Brown is the author of "Body of Truth" and "Brave Girl Eating." She has edited two anthologies and has written for the New York Times Magazine, O Magazine, Psychology Today, Prevention, and many other publications. She is a professor of magazine journalism at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University.

In "Shadow Daughter," she tackles a subject we rarely discuss as a culture: family estrangements. Despite the fact that the issue touches most people one way or another, estrangement is still shrouded in secrecy, stigma, and shame. We simply don't talk about it, and that silence can make an already difficult situation even harder.

Brown tells her story with clear-eyed honesty and hard-won wisdom; she also shared interviews with others who are estranged, as well as the most recent research on this taboo topic."

It is probably safe to say, parents everywhere are deeply concerned about the education of their children, especially now, when education has become a minefield of politics and opposing views.

Ken Robinson, one of the world's most influential educators, has had countless conversations with parents about the dilemmas they face with regard to finding the best school, teacher and curriculum for their child. His new book, "You, Your Child, And School: Navigating Your Way to the Best Education," guides parents with prescriptive and sometimes controversial advice on how to help their children get the education they need and deserve.

Sir Ken Robinson is an internationally recognized leader in the development of creativity, innovation, and human potential. For twelve years, he was professor of education at the University of Warwick in the UK and is now professor emeritus.

A wise, warm, and witty gift for new (and gently used) parents seeking to raise positive, thoughtful children, this alphabet book brims with the advice only those who've been there can give. From "D is for Dog" (get one) to "P is for Praise" (do it often but appropriately) to "R is for Romance" (keep it alive after the kids come), each mini essay is coupled with a smart, letter-appropriate full-color photograph in these delightfully grown-up ABCs.

Deborah Copaken is an author and photojournalist. Her newest book is The ABC's of Parenthood: An Alphabet of Parenting Advice.

The new book, “Modern Loss: Candid Conversation about Grief. Beginners Welcome,” is an examination into navigating grief and resilience in the age of social media, offering comfort and community for coping with the mess of loss through candid original essays from a variety of voices.

At a time when we mourn public figures and national tragedies with hashtags, where intimate posts about loss go viral and we receive automated birthday reminders for dead friends, it’s clear we are navigating new terrain without a road map.

Enter Rebecca Soffer and Gabrielle Birkner. Each having lost parents as young adults, they co-founded Modern Loss, responding to a need to change the dialogue around the messy experience of grief. They look to offer the insights of the Modern Loss community to help us cry, laugh, grieve, identify, and empathize.


  Singer-songwriter and visual artist, Natalia Zukerman, will perform at Helsinki Hudson this Sunday, October 22nd as part of The Rogovoy Salon.

 

Zukerman’s parents are renowned musicians, flutist Eugenia Zukerman and violinist Pinchas Zukerman. Natalia is a whiz with most things string: including acoustic and electric guitar, slide guitar, dobro, lap steel and banjo.

 

Her performance at Club Helsinki, The Women Who Rode Away: Songs and Portraits, will feature visual art alongside portrait songs about and inspired by women.

In Raising Cooperative Kids, research psychologists Marion Forgatch and Gerald Patterson, one of the original developers of Time Out, provide parenting techniques that tap deep-rooted human instincts, making them universal and easy to use no matter where you live or how your family is structured.

Developed over 40 years of practice and tested in clinical and prevention trials, these skills empower parents to teach their children new behaviors, change unwanted behaviors, and reduce family conflicts. Together, Forgatch, Patterson, and Friend give parents the formula to overcome family struggles and inspire children to cooperate -- from toddlerhood into their teens.

Cheshire Parents May Opt To Move Children

Mar 24, 2017
classroom
en.wikipedia.org

Residents of the Town of Cheshire, Massachusetts are struggling to choose what school their children will go to when the local elementary school closes next year. 

The Maya Gold Foundation was created in response to the tragic death of 15-year old Maya Gold, a New Paltz High School student who took her own life in October of 2015. Maya’s parents, Elise Gold and Mathew Swerdloff, launched the organization with help from community members and friends, in response to the social pressures and concerns her death brought to light.

In addition to being a loving daughter, sister, and friend, Maya was a social activist, an inspired student, and creatively engaged with the world. She loved to travel and dreamed of working in Nepal. In Maya’s honor, the Foundation will collaborate with communities in and around New Paltz and in Nepal.

Natalie Merchant and Friends will play a benefit concert for the Maya Gold Foundation on Saturday, October 22 at 7 PM at Studley Hall, SUNY New Paltz.

Elise Gold and Mathew Swerdloff join us now to tell us more about their work and The Maya Gold Foundation. 

  Popular parenting expert Dr. Laura Markham, whose latest book is Peaceful Parents, Happy Siblings, has garnered a loyal readership around the world, thanks to her simple, insightful approach that values the emotional bond between parent and child.

As any parent of more than one child knows, though, it’s challenging for even the most engaged parent to maintain harmony and a strong connection when competition, tempers, and irritation run high.

  

  A child of the Rhodesian wars and daughter of two deeply complicated parents, Alexandra Fuller is no stranger to pain. But the disintegration of Fuller’s own marriage leaves her shattered. Looking to pick up the pieces of her life, she finally confronts the tough questions about her past, about the American man she married, and about the family she left behind in Africa.

Fuller’s new memoir is: Leaving Before the Rains Come. It begins with the dreadful first years of the American financial crisis when Fuller’s delicate balance—between American pragmatism and African fatalism, the linchpin of her unorthodox marriage—irrevocably fails.

Recalling her unusual courtship in Zambia—elephant attacks on the first date, sick with malaria on the wedding day—Fuller struggles to understand her younger self as she overcomes her current misfortunes.

    

  National Coming Out Day is October 11th. There is a new guide for parents to help them answer questions when their son and/or daughter come out to them. We welcome the authors of the new: This is a Book for Parents of Gay Kids.

   Michael Hainey was 6 years old in 1970 when his Uncle came to their home one morning, to tell Michael and his brother that their father was dead. Bob Hainey was just 35. He was the night editor at the Chicago Sun-Times. Bob Hainey had died of a heart attack on a North Side street - as one of the obits put it - while visiting friends.

Over the years, Michael Hainey grew up to be a journalist himself - he's now the deputy editor of GQ - and began to wonder about some of the small differences in the obits between newspapers, and about some of the obliqueness in the accounts of his father's death that he grew up hearing from his uncle and mother.

So, he set out to find the story himself. His new book is After Visiting Friends: A Son's Story.

Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity, Andrew Solomon’s book on parents, children and the bond between them and the cases of extreme difference - was published to ecstatic acclaim last year - landing on best-seller lists across the country, and "Best of" lists from The New York Times, Amazon, The Economist and more.

The book has now been released in paperback. Solomon opens Far From the Tree with an autobiographical chapter detailing his experience as a gay son of heterosexual parents. At the time of his youth, homosexuality was considered an illness and a crime. The book is about the struggle for those who are different and their need to find their own identity.

Michael Thompson

May 14, 2013

    Berkshire Country Day School and the Berkshires Hills Regional School District present an evening with Michael G. Thompson, Ph.D. at 7 pm on Wednesday May 15th at Berkshire Country Day School.

In his work, Dr. Thompson has explored the emotional lives of boys, friendships and social cruelty in childhood, the impact of summer camp experiences on child development, the tensions that arise in the parent-teacher relationships, and psychological aspects of school leadership. His latest book Homesick and Happy: How Time Away From Parents Can Help a Child Grow.

In 1982 years ago, Sue Grafton introduced us to Kinsey Millhone - the main character in her best-selling alphabet mystery series. In her new book, Kinsey and Me: Stories Grafton gives readers stories that reveal Kinsey’s origins and Sue’s past.