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parenting

National Fatherhood Initiative

A national program on parenting education for fathers is celebrating 10 years in Berkshire County.

We are in the middle of a cultural revolution, where the spectrum of gender and sexual identities is seemingly unlimited. So when author and journalist Lisa Selin Davis's six-year-old daughter first called herself a "tomboy," Davis was hesitant.

Her child favored sweatpants and T-shirts over anything pink or princess-themed, just like the sporty, skinned-kneed girls Davis had played with as a kid. But "tomboy" seemed like an outdated word--why use a word with "boy" in it for such girls at all? So was it outdated?

In an era where some are throwing elaborate gender reveal parties and others are embracing they/them pronouns, Davis set out to answer that question, and to find out where tomboys fit into our changing understandings of gender.

The name of the book is "Tomboy: The Surprising History and Future of Girls Who Dare to Be Different."

Parents live in a culture obsessed with their children and their own outcomes, so they are highly susceptible to anxiety and perfectionism. Washington Post parenting columnist Meghan Leahy joins us to assuage our worries and overwhelm with her book, "Parenting Outside the Lines."

Leahy provides insights on how we can trust our gut, pick our battles, and how to assess what works best for our individual children. Leahy uses the lessons from the parenting trenches, common sense, and her nearly twenty years of experience helping families to create thoughtful questions that can help every parent find their own intuition. 

Meghan Leahy is the On Parenting columnist for The Washington Post, and a certified parenting coach. 

With catastrophic global warming already baked into the climate system, today's children face a future entirely unlike that of their parents. How can we maintain hope and make a difference in the face of overwhelming evidence of the climate crisis?

Harriet Sugarman, Executive Director of Climate Mama, Professor of Global Climate Change Policy and World Sustainability, and Chair of the Climate Reality Project is the author of the new book, "How to Talk to Your Kids About Climate Change," which provides tools and strategies for parents to explain the climate emergency to their kids and galvanize positive action.

Pawan Dhingra is Professor of American Studies at Amherst College. He is the author of many books, including "Life Behind the Lobby: Indian American Motel Owners and the American Dream." His work has been featured in the Boston Globe, the Washington Post, The New York Times, Salon, the PBS News Hour, and the documentary, "Breaking the Bee."

In "Hyper Education," he uncovers the growing world of high-achievement education and the after-school learning centers, spelling bees, and math competitions that it has spawned.

Deborah L. Rhode is the Ernest W. McFarland Professor of Law, and the director of the Center on the Legal Profession at Stanford University. She was the founding president of the International Association of Legal Ethics, the former president of the Association of American Law Schools, and the former founding director of Stanford's Center on Ethics. She is the nation's most frequently cited scholar on legal ethics and the author of 30 books in the fields of professional responsibility, leadership, and gender.

Her new book is "Character: What It Means and Why It Matters."

William Doyle is a New York Times bestselling author and TV producer for networks including HBO, The History Channel, and PBS. Since 2015 he has served as Fulbright Scholar, Scholar in Residence and Lecturer on Media and Education at University of Eastern Finland, a Rockefeller Foundation Resident Fellow, and advisor to the Ministry of Education and Culture of Finland.

With Pasi Sahlberg, Professor of Education Policy at Gonski Institute for Education, University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, Doyle has written the book "Let the Children Play: How More Play Will Save Our Schools and Help Children Thrive."

“Imaginary Friend” is the new novel, a horror story, by Stephen Chbosky. It comes 20 years after he wrote the bestselling coming-of-age novel "The Perks of Being a Wallflower." The new book raises questions about faith, parenting, friendship and what it means to protect those you love most in an increasingly complex and dangerous world.


  Dr. Marika Lindholm a sociologist and the founder of Empowering Solo Moms Everywhere and esme.com - a gathering place for solo mothers to discuss their experiences and find information about navigating the particular challenges or raising children alone. 

 

Lindholm is the co-editor of the new book “We Got This: Solo Mom Stories of Grit, Heart and Humor.” She will be at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck, New York at 6pm on Friday, November 1.

How do you raise a reader in this ever changing world of technology, devices and other distractions? Screen time may often be more appealing than reading time for a child. But with reading known to be so important, how can a parent encourage kids to make reading a priority?

In the new book, "How to Raise a Reader," leading book authorities Pamela Paul - who oversees all book coverage at the New York Times, and Maria Russo - editor of children’s books at the Times - answer these urgent questions.

The book is divided into 4 stages of childhood—from babies to teens—and filled with practical tips, strategies that work, been-there wisdom, and inspirational advice.

Anna Quindlen became a go-to writer on the joys and challenges of family, motherhood, and modern life, in her nationally syndicated column.

In her new book, "Nanaville: Adventures in Grandparenting," she offers observations about her new role, no longer mother and decision-maker, but secondary character and support to the parents of her grandchildren.

When Lois Letchford learns her son has been diagnosed with a low IQ at the end of grade one, she refuses to give up on his future. After thorough testing, Nicholas proves to have no spatial awareness, limited concentration, and can only read ten words.

Nicholas is labeled "learning disabled," a designation considered more derogatory than "dyslexia," the world of education is quick to cast him aside. Determined to prove them all wrong, Lois temporarily removes her son from the school system and begins working with him one-on-one.

What happens next is a journey: spanning three continents, unique teaching experiments, never-ending battles with the school system, a mother’s discovery of her own learning blocks, and a bond fueled by the desire to rid Nicholas of the “disabled” label.

Lois Letchford's book is "Reversed: A Memoir."

Dr. W. Thomas Boyce is a pediatrician and Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Departments of Pediatrics and Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Boyce's research addresses individual differences in children’s biological sensitivity to social contexts, such as the family, classroom and community.

In his new book, "The Orchid and the Dandelion," he explores the "dandelion" child (hardy, resilient, healthy), able to survive and flourish under most circumstances, and the "orchid" child (sensitive, susceptible, fragile), who, given the right support, can thrive as much as, if not more than, other children.

Boyce writes of his pathfinding research as a developmental pediatrician working with troubled children in child-development research for almost four decades, and explores his major discovery that reveals how genetic make-up and environment shape behavior.

“How can we ensure that our sons are well-prepared and well-launched to manhood?” In the new book, "How to Raise a Boy: The Power of Connection to Raise Good Men," Michael Reichert, uses this fundamental question as a foundation to what we know and what we are missing when it comes to raising our sons.

Dr. Reichert guides readers through decades of research and practical applications toward a new understanding of what boyhood should be and how we, as parents and educators, can prepare boys to be good men.

Parents and educators have a unique opportunity to shift the cultural conversation and create a new paradigm for what it means to raise a boy – one who is kind, respectful, and fundamentally good, rather than the models of abuse, violence, and havoc that seem to dominate the airwaves today.

If you are the parent of a toddler or preschooler, chances are you know a thing or two about tantrums. While those epic meltdowns can certainly be part of "normal" toddler behavior, they are still maddening, stressful, and exhausting--for everyone involved.

What can you do to keep your cool and help your child calm down? Rebecca Schrag Hershberg, child psychologist and mother of two, has a unique understanding of both the science behind tantrums and what works in the heat of the moment to nip blowups in the bud.

Her new book is: “The Tantrum Survival Guide: Tune In to Your Toddler's Mind (and Your Own) to Calm the Craziness and Make Family Fun Again.”

Psychotherapist Teresa Gil joins us this morning discuss her new book: "Women Who Were Sexually Abused Children: Mothering, Resilience, and Protecting the Next Generation." The book is made up of stories of mothers who survived sexual abuse as children reveal the struggles, challenges, and triumphs of this special group of women.

Unraveling the veil of silence and capturing the experiences of mothers who were sexually abused as children, this book offers a first step in both supporting mothers and disrupting the cycle of intergenerational abuse that keeps these mothers isolated and alone in their mothering challenges and successes.

Teresa Gil, PhD, has been a psychotherapist, professor, and trainer for more than 25 years. She has a private practice working with women, children, and families dealing with recovery from child abuse and trauma. She is a full professor and teaches General Psychology, Abnormal Psychology, Child Psychology, and Psychology of Women at Hudson Valley Community College.

Daphne de Marneffe, PhD, is a psychologist and the author of "Maternal Desire: On Children, Love, and the Inner Life." In her clinical practice, she offers psychotherapy to couples and individuals. She teaches and lectures widely on marriage, couple therapy, adult development, and parenthood. 

In her new book, "The Rough Patch: Marriage and the Art of Living Together," she explores the pushes and pulls of midlife marriage, where an individual's need to develop can crash headlong into the demands of a relationship.

  When Sara Zaske moved from Oregon to Berlin with her husband and toddler, she knew the transition would be challenging, especially when she became pregnant with her second child. She was surprised to discover that German parents give their children a great deal of freedom - much more than Americans. German parents did not share her fears, and their children were thriving. Was she doing the opposite of what she intended, which was to raise capable children? Why was parenting culture so different in the States?

In her book, "Achtung Baby," Zaske shares the many unexpected parenting lessons she learned from living in Germany.

In Raising Cooperative Kids, research psychologists Marion Forgatch and Gerald Patterson, one of the original developers of Time Out, provide parenting techniques that tap deep-rooted human instincts, making them universal and easy to use no matter where you live or how your family is structured.

Developed over 40 years of practice and tested in clinical and prevention trials, these skills empower parents to teach their children new behaviors, change unwanted behaviors, and reduce family conflicts. Together, Forgatch, Patterson, and Friend give parents the formula to overcome family struggles and inspire children to cooperate -- from toddlerhood into their teens.

Thousands of pregnant women pass through our nation’s jails every year. What happens to them as they carry their pregnancies in a space of punishment? In this time when the public safety net is frayed, incarceration has become a central and racialized strategy for managing the poor.

In her book Jailcare, Carolyn Sufrin explores how jail has, paradoxically, become a place where women can find care. Carolyn Sufrin is a medical anthropologist and an obstetrician-gynecologist at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Listener Essay - The Deputation

Jun 16, 2017

Gayu Seenumani immigrated to the US from Chennai India – where her parents still live. She is an engineer working at GE Global Research. She lives in Niskayuna with her husband.

The Deputation

To love is to devote. My experience says so.

My adolescence was marked with my mother being sent away. Or that was how I felt. In fact, she was chosen to work for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia for a stint, aka., government deputation. She would visit us once a year. These visits were marked by the anticipation that it would be the last. In those years, my father would pick her from the airport and after 20 days, a taxi arrived for her return trip. We would cry profusely saying our good-byes, went into our home and continued crying. Our father returned from the airport, took us for a walk where he would tell us that the year would fly by. That night, he hugged us with the promise that my mother would be back very soon for good. We three slept. This repeated.

Erika Christakis is an early childhood educator and school consultant. She has written a new book, The Importance of Being Little.

In it, she explains the challenges of being a little kid trying to navigate a system designed by and for adults, with high-stakes academic curricula and stringent schedules. 

The good news is that young children are hard-wired to learn in any setting, and tools to improve preschools are within reach of any parent and educator. The book offers a road map to giving children what they really need. 

Raquel D'Apice is a humor writer and founder of the popular blog The Ugly Volvo.

Welcome to the Club is a refreshing spin on the baby milestone book. Instead of a place to lovingly capture the first time baby sleeps through the night, this book shows what it's like the first time baby rolls off the bed/sofa/changing table, leaving mom or dad in a state of pure terror (it happens).

These 100 rarely documented but all-too-realistic milestones—such as "First Time Baby Says a Word You Didn't Want Her to Say"—provide comfort, solidarity, and comic relief for new parents.

  In Raising Human Beings, internationally renowned child psychologist and New York Times bestselling author of Lost at School and The Explosive Child Ross W. Greene Ph.D. explains how to cultivate a better parent-child relationship while also nurturing empathy, honesty, resilience, and independence.

  One of the biggest fears of parents with children with autism is looming adulthood and all that it entails.

In her new book, Autism Adulthood: Strategies and Insights for a Fulfilling Life, Susan Senator takes the mystery out of adult life on the autism spectrum and conveys the positive message that even though autism adulthood is complicated and challenging, there are many ways to make it manageable and enjoyable.

Margaux Bergen began writing her new book when her daughter Charlotte turned nine and she gave it to her right after graduation from high school, when she was setting off for her first day of college.

In Navigating Life: Things I Wish My Mother Had Told Me, Bergen shares her own lessons learned in hopes that her trials and errors might benefit her daughter as she set off for college and prepares to navigate life for the first time on her own.

Margaux Bergen has spent the last twenty years raising three children and working all over the world at large and small institutions focused on international development and women’s leadership.

  After four decades as a reporter, Lesley Stahl’s most vivid and transformative experience of her life was not covering the White House, interviewing heads of state, or researching stories at 60 Minutes. It was becoming a grandmother.

She was hit with a jolt of joy so intense and unexpected, she wanted to “investigate” it—as though it were a news flash. And so, using her60 Minutes skills, she explored how grandmothering changes a woman’s life.

Her new book is Becoming Grandma: The Joys and Science of the New Grandparenting.

  Soon after Hillary Whittington and her husband, Jeff, addressed their daughter Ryland’s deafness with cochlear implants, Ryland began to express clearly, in word and behavior, a male identity, in ways typically seen as markers for young transgender children.

In her book, Raising Ryland: Our Story Of Parenting A Transgender Child With No Strings Attached, Hillary shares her family's story.

   Little children come into the world hardwired to learn in virtually any setting and about any matter. Yet in today’s preschool and kindergarten classrooms, learning has been reduced to scripted lessons and suspect metrics that too often undervalue a child’s intelligence while overtaxing the child’s growing brain. 

  In The Importance of Being Little: What Preschoolers Really Need from Grownups, Christakis explains what it’s like to be a young child in America today, in a world designed by and for adults, where we have confused schooling with learning. She offers real-life solutions to real-life issues, with nuance and direction that takes us far beyond the usual prescriptions for fewer tests, more play.

  Author and former radio host Claude Knobler shared the very beginning of his journey as a parent in this 2008 interview “Life is Wonderfully Ridiculous” for NPR’s This I Believe series: after reading a New York Times magazine story about an orphanage in Ethiopia, he told his wife Mary, that maybe they could help, trying to impress her with his generosity and kind heart, but never really believing she’d say yes.

And so alongside the seven year old son and five year old daughter they already had, Claude and Mary Knobler adopted Nati, a five year old Ethiopian boy who spoke no English to join their family in Los Angeles. That was twelve years ago.

In his book, More Love, Less Panic, Knobler weaves together moving stories about trying to turn his loud, spirited, and “too happy” African son into a quiet, neurotic, Jewish kid like he himself had once been, quickly learning a lesson that made him a better father – not just to Nati, but to all three of his kids.

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