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The Opalka Gallery presents a 25-year survey of the work of JoAnne Carson in an exhibition entitled “JoAnne Carson: Rise Up and Shine!”

Carson’s work is on view in the gallery now and there will be an opening reception and artist talk on Friday, February 7.

Carson, who is a Professor of Studio Art and Graduate Director Art & Art History at UAlbany has established a unique artistic voice that merges references to the natural world with unexpected materials and colorful world-building.

She has received many awards including a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Louise Bourgeois Residency from Yaddo, and an artist grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

JoAnne Carson joins us along with the Director of The Opalka Gallery, Judie Gilmore.

Nocturne 4 Birdhouse - an all blue nighttime landscape painting
John Gordon Gauld

Unborn Sun: The Paintings of John Gordon Gauld” is on view in The Leonhardt Galleries at the Berkshire Botanical Garden in Stockbridge, Massachusetts through February 7 and there will be a "Meet the Artist" Gallery Presentation and Tea Service this Sunday, January 19 from 2 to 4 p.m. 

John Gordon Gauld graduated with a BFA with Honors from the Rhode Island School of Design and is the recent recipient of the Martha Boschen Porter Grant from the Berkshire Taconic Foundation to fund his future work.

The exhibition “Ida O’Keeffe: Escaping Georgia’s Shadow” brings together thirty-five paintings, prints, and photographs exploring the artist’s mastery of color and composition as well as her complex relationship with her well-known sister, Georgia. The show will be on view at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts through October 14.

Organized by the Dallas Museum of Art and curated by Sue Canterbury, The Pauline Gill Sullivan Associate Curator of American Art, the exhibition debuted in Dallas in 2018 and is the first ever solo museum exhibition of works by Ida Ten Eyck O’Keeffe and the most comprehensive survey of the artist’s work to date.

Robert Wiesenberger is the Associate Curator of Contemporary Projects at The Clark and he led us through the exhibition.

The Concert, 1918–19. Oil on canvas, 29 3/4 x 36 1/2 in. Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto. Gift of Reuben Wells Leonard Estate, 1954, 53/27
Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Over the course of his long career, French painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir continually turned to the human figure for artistic inspiration. Renoir was born in 1841 and died a century ago in 1919. To observe the centenary of his death, the Clark Art Institute and the Kimbell Art Museum present the new exhibition, “Renoir: The Body, The Senses.” Include paintings, drawings, pastels, and sculptures by Renoir as well as works by his predecessors, contemporaries, and followers, the exhibition is on display at The Clark in Williamstown, Massachusetts through September 22.

“Renoir: The Body, The Senses” features works from The Clark’s collection and loans from all around the world. It was co-organized by Esther Bell, the Robert and Martha Berman Lipp Chief Curator at the Clark, and George T. M. Shackelford, Deputy Director at the Kimbell.

Esther Bell lead us through the exhibition.

The Thomas Cole National Historic Site in Catskill, New York has opened a new exhibition that, for the first time, explorers Cole's paintings of Catskill Creek.

"Thomas Cole’s Refrain: The Paintings of Catskill Creek" will run through November 3rd. Created during the 18-year period between 1827 and 1845, the artist's paintings of Catskill Creek constitute the most sustained sequence of landscape paintings he ever made. The views in the paintings were all anchored along one short stretch of Catskill Creek near the Village of Catskill.

To tell us more we welcome the Thomas Cole Site's curator, Kate Menconeri, and the exhibition's curator, H. Daniel Peck.

Greenwich, New York native Jacob Houston has charmed audiences throughout the Northeast with his idyllic land and cityscapes and detailed glimpses into everyday life. With bright colors and enamel-like scenes, he romanticizes the places he travels, re-creating the world as he sees it: full of joy, wonder, and beauty.

Houston’s artwork has been exhibited throughout the region, at LARAC’s Lapham Gallery, Saratoga Arts Center, Washington County Farm Museum, Green Bridge Gallery, Historic Salem Courthouse, and Southern Vermont Arts Center. His reach extends into Vermont and Massachusetts and, increasingly, New York City.

His new exhibition, “A Magical World: The Art of Jacob Houston,” is on view through June 23rd a the Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, New York. We are joined by Jacob Houston, Claire Houston, and The Hyde’s Director of Curatorial Affairs and Programming Jonathan Canning.

Artists Joseph Mallord William Turner and John Constable rose to prominence as landscape painters in early nineteenth–century England. Their choices of subjects and the way in which they composed their views, together with innovative brushwork, helped elevate a traditionally overlooked genre.

The Clark’s exhibition “Turner and Constable: The Inhabited Landscape” features more than fifty oil paintings, watercolors, drawings, and prints and will be on view in Williamstown, Massachusetts through March 10. Curator Alexis Goodin leads us on a gallery tour.

Renowned illustrator Gregory Manchess has created a lavishly painted novel about the son of a famed polar explorer searching for his stranded father, and a lost city buried under snow in an alternate future.

In "Above the Timberline," when it started to snow, it didn’t stop for 1,500 years. The Pole Shift that ancient climatologists talked about finally came, the topography was ripped apart and the weather of the world was changed—forever. Now the Earth is covered in snow, and to unknown depths in some places.

Original artworks from the book are currently on view at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA through February 24th. Manchess has worked as a freelance illustrator for nearly forty years on advertising campaigns, magazines, and book covers.

Frederic Edwin Church, a central figure in a group of artists known as the Hudson River School, became internationally renowned as a painter of monumental landscapes. The spectacular panoramas he painted in the 1840s through 1890s helped shape not only the cultural identity of the United States, but also of himself when he applied his vision as an artist to the house and 250-acre landscape that he named Olana, known today as Olana State Historic Site, a National Historic Landmark.

Olana’s designed landscape has been sensitively restored over the last ten years and can now be experienced by visitors very much as Church and his family experienced it in the 19th century. The new book: "Frederic Church’s Olana on the Hudson: Art Landscape Architecture," includes nearly fifty paintings and sketches by Church, alongside gorgeous photography by Larry Lederman and engaging essays by David Schuyler, Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, Stephen Hannock, and Thomas Woltz and Eleanor Jones Harvey who join us.

JOHAN PERSSON

  Under the watchful gaze of his young assistant, and the threatening presence of a new generation of artists, Mark Rothko takes on his greatest challenge yet: to create a definitive work for an extraordinary setting.

Based on the original Donmar Warehouse production, this new production of "Red" is the first ever UK revival since MGC Artistic Director Michael Grandage directed the premier in 2009. The production went on to win six Tony Awards including Best Play.

Award-winning stage and screen actor Alfred Molina reprises his critically acclaimed performance as the American abstract expressionist painter Mark Rothko. He is joined by rising star Alfred Enoch, of US television drama series "How to Get Away With Murder," as his assistant Ken.

"Red" will screen in cinemas on November 7, distributed by Trafalgar Releasing.

Artist and author, Hudson Talbott, join us now to tell us about his new book, “Picturing America: Thomas Cole and the Birth of American Art.”

It is a fascinating look at artist Thomas Cole's life and takes young readers from his humble beginnings to his development of a new painting style that became America's first formal art movement: the Hudson River school of painting.

Hudson Talbott depicts the immigrant artist falling in love with, and fighting to preserve, his new country.

Talbott has written and illustrated more than 20 children’s books, including Newbery Honor winner “Show Way,” ALA Notable Book and VOYA Honor Book “Leonardo’s Horse” (by Jean Fritz), and “We're Back! A Dinosaur's Story,” which was adapted into an animated film by Steven Spielberg.

Exhibition photo: "Picturesque and Sublime: Thomas Cole’s Trans-Atlantic Inheritance" in Cole’s New Studio
Peter Aaron/OTTO / thomascole.org

The 2nd annual Hudson River Skywalk Arts Festival is on Sunday, September 30 at the Rip Van Winkle Bridge, the Thomas Cole National Historic Site, and Olana.

This is the 200th Anniversary of Thomas Cole's arrival in America, which is a pivotal moment for the birth of American art, as is reflected in the major exhibition of Cole's work, organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, which is now on view at the National Gallery, London. The Thomas Cole site also has two exhibitions on display “Picturesque and Sublime: Thomas Cole’s Trans-Atlantic Inheritance” and “SPECTRUM.”

To tell us more we welcome Betsy Jacks, Executive Director of the Thomas Cole National Historic Site in Catskill, and Kate Menconeri, Curator at the Cole Site.

Let us now travel to Cooperstown, NY where the Fenimore Art Museum’s new exhibit: “Thomas Cole and the Garden of Eden” is now on display. The exhibition centers on Cole’s masterwork “Expulsion from the Garden of Eden,” lent by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and explores his aspirations for landscape painting at the start of his career in the 1820s and early 1830s.

Sixteen original works, including paintings from the Fenimore’s collection and loans from more than a dozen other institutions and private collectors survey the themes of the Garden of Eden. The exhibition also reveals artists that influenced Cole early in his career, such as Asher B. Durand and Thomas Doughty.

Chris Rossi is the Director of Exhibitions at the Fenimore Art Museum.

This Saturday, April 28, Linda Lavin and Steve Bakunas will present "Portrait Of An Artist" at 5 p.m. in a benefit performance for the Spencertown Academy Arts Center.

The event features Lavin and Bakunas in a 90-minute intimate evening during which she answers questions about her life and career, posed by her husband, while he paints her portrait on stage. An evening of warmth, romance, humor and nostalgia, the couple has previously performed the program at venues around the country.

Celebrated and bestselling author of "The Imperfectionists," Tom Rachman has set his sights on a new subject - artists, in his new novel, "The Italian Teacher," about the son of a great painter striving to create his own legacy.

Pinch Bavinsky, son of the world-famous painter Bear Bavinksy, is an aspiring artist living in the shadow of his famous father, struggling to build a legacy of his own. Rachman explores the tension between the creative life and family life through Pinch’s most important relationships.

In his new memoir, "20th Century Boy," celebrated New York City painter, Duncan Hannah gives a rollicking and vividly immediate account of his life amid the city's glamor and extravagances in their most vital era as an aspiring artist, roaring boy, dandy, cultural omnivore, and far-from-obscure object of desire.

He will discuss the book and the heady days of the Seventies New York Art scene with his Editor, Gerry Howard at the White Hart Inn in an Oblong Books event on Thursday at 6PM in Salisbury, Connecticut.

The new exhibit: Andrew Wyeth at 100: A Family Remembrance is now open at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, NY through September 4th.

The exhibition celebrates Andrew Wyeth’s 100th birthday as expressed by his granddaughter and guest curator, Victoria Wyeth. It includes objects from Ms. Wyeth’s personal collection, many never-before exhibited, including Andrew Wyeth’s sketches, studies, paintings, artifacts, and ephemera, as well as Ms. Wyeth’s own photographs of her grandfather.

It also includes Andrew Wyeth paintings from public and private collections. The exhibition will share an intimate view of the artist in his role as husband, father, and grandfather, and explore those relationships through art, artifacts, and photographs. On view will be two of Wyeth’s most popular works—Master Bedroom (1965) and The Revenant (1949).

Victoria Wyeth joins us this morning along with Director of Exhibitions at the Fenimore Museum – Chris Rossi.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

The Thomas Cole National Historic Site in Catskill is now open for its 2017 season and features two new landmark exhibitions. 

“The Parlors” is an immersive installation that combines technology and meticulous historic restoration of the two parlors of Cole's 1815 Home, the rooms where America's first major art movement was born. It features a stunning discovery revealed during the restoration: the earliest-known, interior decorative painting by an American artist. 

Also, “Sanford R. Gifford in the Catskills” is an exhibition of Catskills paintings of Sanford Robinson Gifford (1823-1880), a leading member of the Hudson River School of landscape painting, who credited Cole’s works with stimulating his interest in landscape painting. Gifford grew up in Hudson, and this is the first such show of this magnitude to take place in the region that inspired Cole and Gifford.

Betsy Jacks, Executive Director of the Thomas Cole National Historic Site, joins us this morning to discuss the opening these two exhibitions and their importance to the history of the region. 

David Salle is an internationally renowned painter whose work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Guggenheim Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tate Museum and National Galarie of Berlin, among many others.   He also has a long-standing involvement with performance working extensively over the last 25 years with choreographer Karole Armitage, creating sets and costumes for many of her ballets and operas.  Salle is also a prolific writer on art. His new book is How To See.

On Wednesday, March 23, he will be featured in the New York Writers Institute The Creative Life Series in conversation with Joe Donahue, live in the Recital Hall at UAlbany at 7pm. 

  In Identity Unknown, Donna Seaman brings to life seven forgotten female artists, among the best of their day: Gertrude Abercrombie, with her dark, surreal paintings and friendships with Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Rollins; Bay Area self-portraitist Joan Brown; Ree Morton, with her witty, oddly beautiful constructions; Loïs Mailou Jones of the Harlem Renaissance; Lenore Tawney, who combined weaving and sculpture when art and craft were considered mutually exclusive; Christina Ramberg, whose unsettling works drew on pop culture and advertising; and Louise Nevelson, an art-world superstar in her heyday but omitted from recent surveys of her era.

Donna Seaman is Editor, Adult Books, Booklist, a member of the advisory council for the American Writers Museum, and a recipient of the James Friend Memorial Award for Literary Criticism and the Studs Terkel Humanities Service Award. 

She will be at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck on Saturday, February 25.

J.M.W. Turner is one of the most important figures in Western art, and his visionary work paved the way for a revolution in landscape painting. Over the course of his lifetime, Turner strove to liberate painting from an antiquated system of patronage. Bringing a new level of expression and color to his canvases, he paved the way for the modern artist.

Franny Moyle studied Art History at St John's College, Cambridge. She enjoyed a career in arts programming at the BBC that culminated in her becoming the corporation's first Commissioner for Arts and Culture. She is now a freelance executive producer and writer and lives in east London. Her new book is Turner: The Extraordinary Life and Momentous Times of J.M.W. Turner.

In his new show at The Lionheart Gallery in Pound Ridge, N.Y., “Kings & Queens of Late Night,” running through January 2nd, “recovering lawyer” Geoffrey Stein paints collage portraits of an all-star cast of network and cable comedy and punditry.

Stein’s Lionheart Gallery lineup of the late night heroes who wield wit and humor like surgical scalpels includes Jon Stewart, Jay Leno, Amy Schumer, Jimmy Fallon, Chelsea Handler, Samantha Bee, Larry Wilmore, Bill Maher, John Oliver, Trevor Noah, Stephen Colbert and David Letterman.

Examples from this exhibit include Jon Stewart’s portrait made with the 9/11 Responders’ act he championed, Amy Schumer done with her cousin Chuck Schumer’s Gun Control bill, Jimmy Fallon created from thank you cards, and John Oliver done with USA Today and the London Tube Map.

Stein, who lives and works in New York City, received an MFA from the Slade School of Fine Art in London and has been painting full-time since 2000. 

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, we continue to learn about the music of Thea Musgrave.

  Boston in the 1740s: a bustling port at the edge of the British empire. A boy comes of age in a small wooden house along the Long Wharf, which juts into the harbor, as though reaching for London thousands of miles across the ocean. Sometime in his childhood, he learns to draw.

That boy was John Singleton Copley, who became, by the 1760s, colonial America’s premier painter. His brush captured the faces of his neighbors -- ordinary men like Paul Revere, John Hancock, and Samuel Adams -- who would become the revolutionary heroes of a new United States. Today, in museums across America, Copley’s brilliant portraits evoke patriotic fervor and rebellious optimism.

The artist, however, did not share his subjects’ politics. Copley’s nation was Britain; his capital, London. When rebellion sundered Britain’s empire, both kin and calling determined the painter’s allegiances. He sought the largest canvas for his talents and the safest home for his family. So, by the time the United States declared its independence, Copley and his kin were in London. He painted America’s revolution from a far shore, as Britain’s American War.

His story is told in Jane Kamensky's new book, A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley.

  Claude Monet is perhaps the world's most beloved artist, and among all his creations, the paintings of the water lilies in his garden at Giverny are most famous. Seeing them in museums around the world, viewers are transported by the power of Monet's brush into a peaceful world of harmonious nature. Monet himself intended them to provide “an asylum of peaceful meditation.”

Yet, as Ross King reveals in Mad Enchantment: Claude Monet and the Painting of the Water Lilies his chronicle of both artist and masterpiece, these beautiful canvases belie the intense frustration Monet experienced at the difficulties of capturing the fugitive effects of light, water, and color. They also reflect the terrible personal torments Monet suffered in the last dozen years of his life.

The Teaching Gallery at Hudson Valley Community College presents Floating World, an exhibition of paintings by New Lebanon artist Maggie Mailer, on view through October 22nd.

The paintings in Mailer’s Floating World are richly layered, ambiguous landscapes that bravely embody the artist’s willingness to trust her viewers. Mailer says the title refers to the “floating world” of 18th century Japanese Ukiyo-e prints, a worldview based on hedonism, pleasure and escapism. It was a world envisioned to be safe from danger, sadness or disasters, both real and imagined.

Mailer’s painting process is an intentionally unscientific combination of instinct, skill, accident and trust. Upon close inspection, any particular moment of a painting might contain layers of sheer, luscious color, references to classical masterworks, day-glow colors seemingly thrown down or scumbled, or thin layers that barely cover the canvas.

Maggie Mailer and Founding director of the Teaching Gallery Tara Fracalossi  join us. 

Berkshire Theatre Group and WAM Theatre present the American Premiere of The Bakelite Masterpiece, by Kate Cayley at the Unicorn Theatre in Stockbridge, September 29 through October 23.

In keeping with their double philanthropic mission, WAM Theatre will be donating 25% of the box office proceeds from this production to their ninth beneficiary, the Berkshire Immigrant Center and Suzi Banks Baum. 

The show is directed by Kristen van Ginhoven and features David Adkins and Corinna May. 

 

The Arkell Museum at Canajoharie, NY is presenting the exhibition Circus Circus through October 16th featuring paintings of the American circus by artists from the 1920s and 1930s alongside circus-themed marketing materials used by the Beech-Nut Packaging Company in the 1930s.

 

The circus coming to town was a highly anticipated event in small towns across America, and many artists in the twenties and thirties painted the spectacle of the parade as the circus arrived, and the excitement under the big top. The exhibition includes paintings by Jon Corbino, Ogden Pleissner and Everett Shinn.

 

Images of circus cars, animals and acrobats were also used to market food products during the 1930s. The Beech-Nut Packing Company was one of the companies to use the excitement and nostalgia of the circus to sell its products. They created magazine ads with clowns and circus animals to sell their gum.

 

This circus-themed marketing campaign culminated in the creation of Beech-Nut miniature circuses that traveled across the country in busses, and a miniature circus was displayed in their pavilion at the New York World’s Fair in 1939.

To tell us more about the exhibit we welcome Art Historian Karal Ann Marling and Museum Director and Curator Diane Forsberg.

artwork by Peter Bynum
Sarah LaDuke

  Manitoga/The Russel Wright Design Center is the House, Studio and Woodland garden of mid-century designer Russel Wright. It is a National Historic Landmark, an Affiliate Site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and a World Monuments Watch Site.

Manitoga’s Artist Residency program was initiated in 2014 to foster creative responses to Manitoga that invoke Russel Wright's legacy of creative experimentation and celebration of place.

This year’s residency artist, Peter Bynum, is known for his light-infused sculptural paintings and large-scale installations. He creates his work by pressing paint between sheets of glass - allowing it to spread, span, and split according to its own plan. He then layers these branched paintings over each other and illuminates them from behind. The effect is singular.

Bynum’s work has been exhibited all over the world. His residency exhibition, Ecstatic Light, presents a site-specific installation of several pieces in Russel Wright’s House and Studio, marking Manitoga’s first presentation of a contemporary artist within the interiors of the property.

  The villains who abuse our monetary system get what's coming to them in The Capitalist, the fifth novel in the critically acclaimed Louis Morgon series, written by cartoonist, painter, and novelist, Peter Steiner.

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