the new yorker

Peter Steiner has been a cartoonist for over thirty years. He created the cartoon "On the internet nobody knows you're a dog," the most reproduced cartoon The New Yorker has ever published. In the late 1990's he began writing novels, at first for his own amusement. Then his first novel, "A French Country Murder" was published in 2003. His second followed in 2008; his third in 2010.

His new work is a graphic novel entitled "An Atheist In Heaven."

Ken Lovett
Ken Lovett

WAMC's David Guistina speaks with Ken Lovett, Albany Bureau Chief for The New York Daily News, about the resignation of state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman.  The Attorney General announced his resignation following allegations published by The New Yorker that he was physically violent toward four women. The pair also discuss possible appointees to the position, which the legislature will decide.

Roz Chast has published more than a thousand cartoons in The New Yorker since 1978. Her frantic and disheveled characters have become icons of American humor. Her new book is "Going Into Town: A Love Letter to New York" – a graphic ode/guide/thank-you note to Manhattan.

Bob Mankoff / The New Yorker

Bob Mankoff, cartoonist and influential cartoon editor for "The New Yorker," submitted more than 500 of his own cartoons to that publication before getting his first acceptance in 1977. He became cartoon editor in 1997, and is credited with nurturing a new generation of talent before retiring this past April.

He currently serves as the Humor and Cartoon Editor at "Esquire." He is the author of the memoir, "How About Never—Is Never Good for You?: My Life in Cartoons."

Mankoff will be in Albany later today with legendary New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast for a New York State Writers Institute seminar at 4:15 this afternoon in the Standish Room at the Science Library on the uptown University at Albany campus. There will be a reading at 8PM tonight in the Huxley Theatre at the New York State Museum in downtown Albany.

  In the summer of 1925, The New Yorker was struggling to survive its first year in print. They took a chance on a young cartoonist who was about to give up his career as an artist. His name was Peter Arno, and his witty social commentary, blush-inducing content, and compositional mastery brought a cosmopolitan edge to the magazine’s pages—a vitality that would soon cement The New Yorker as one of the world’s most celebrated publications.

Alongside New Yorker luminaries such as E.B. White, James Thurber, and founding editor Harold Ross, Arno is one of the select few who made the magazine the cultural touchstone it is today.

In his new biography of one of The New Yorker’s first geniuses, New Yorker cartoonist Michael Maslin dives into Arno’s rocky relationship with the magazine, his fiery marriage to the columnist Lois Long, and his tabloid-cover altercations involving pistols, fists, and barely-legal debutantes.

Michael Maslin’s cartoons have been appearing in The New Yorker for nearly forty years. He is the author or coauthor of eight books of cartoons. His new biography is: Peter Arno: The Mad, Mad World of The New Yorker's Greatest Cartoonist.

    Bob Mankoff is the cartoon editor of The New Yorker magazine and he has the best job in the world. At least, that’s what everyone tells him.

In his new memoir, How About Never – Is Never Good For You? My Life in Cartoons, Mankoff illustrates that in fact he has two amazing jobs. Editor and is also one of the magazine foremost cartoonists himself.

  Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

This morning we welcome the folks from Mass Humanities to discuss the importance of reading on the occasion of The New Yorker taking its pay wall down.

The Sendak Fellowship was established in 2010 as a residency program for artists who tell stories with illustration. The fellowship offers the time for artists to explore their craft outside the limitations of everyday life and in the relative isolation of a rural setting.