new york times book review

How do you raise a reader in this ever changing world of technology, devices and other distractions? Screen time may often be more appealing than reading time for a child. But with reading known to be so important, how can a parent encourage kids to make reading a priority?

In the new book, "How to Raise a Reader," leading book authorities Pamela Paul - who oversees all book coverage at the New York Times, and Maria Russo - editor of children’s books at the Times - answer these urgent questions.

The book is divided into 4 stages of childhood—from babies to teens—and filled with practical tips, strategies that work, been-there wisdom, and inspirational advice.

Pamela Paul, editor of The New York Times Book Review, was in Albany, New York in April for an event with the New York State Writers Institute.

Paul has been a contributor to Time magazine and a columnist for Worth. She also originated and wrote the Studied column in The New York Times Sunday Styles section. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Washington Post, The Economist, Vogue, Slate and more.

Her memoir, "My Life with Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues," tells the story of "Bob," Paul's book of books, a journal she started when she was 17 years old exchange student living in France, recording every book she has read since the summer of 1988. She first wrote about Bob in a 2012 essay in The New York Times.

  One hundred years after its first publication in August 1915, Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken” is so ubiquitous that it’s easy to forget that it is, in fact, a poem.

Widely admired as the poetry columnist for the New York Times Book Review, David Orr deftly illuminates the poem’s enduring greatness while revealing its mystifying contradictions, in The Road Not Taken: Finding America In The Poem Everyone Loves And Almost Everyone Gets Wrong.

Orr examines the poem’s cultural influence, its artistic complexity, and its historical journey from the margins of the First World War all the way to its place today as a true masterpiece of American literature.