new york times

Book cover for "Audience of One"

James Poniewozik has been the chief television critic of the New York Times since 2015. He was previously the television and media critic for Time magazine and media columnist for Salon.

His book "Audience of One" shows how American media have shaped American society and politics, by interweaving two crucial stories.

The first story follows the evolution of television from the three-network era of the 20th century, which joined millions of Americans in a shared monoculture, into today’s zillion-channel, Internet-atomized universe, which sliced and diced them into fractious, alienated subcultures.

The second story is a cultural critique of Donald Trump, the chameleonic celebrity who courted fame, achieved a mind-meld with the media beast, and rode it to ultimate power.

New York Times columnist Gail Collins has written a new book on a subject that is timelier than ever: women and aging in America. Author of the acclaimed New York Times bestsellers “When Everything Changed” and “America’s Women,” Collins was the first woman to serve as the editorial page editor on the New York Times.

Her new book is “No Stopping Us Now: The Adventures of Older Women in American History.”

For 5 years, Trish Hall set the high standard for which opinion pieces ultimately landed on the New York Times Op-Ed page. Her new book is "Writing to Persuade: How to Bring People Over to Your Side" and in it she shares her wisdom and lays it out in terms easy to emulate.

As the person in charge of the Op-Ed page for the New York Times, Hall spent years immersed in argument, passion, and trendsetting ideas but also in tangled sentences, migraine-inducing jargon, and dull-as-dishwater writing.

In the book she draws on her vast experience and presents the ultimate guide to writing persuasively for students, job applicants, and rookie authors looking to get published.

Robin Pogrebin and book cover for "The Education of Brett Kavanaugh"
Photo of Pogrebin: Lorin Klaris Photography

One year ago today, Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed as a Supreme Court justice by a 50–48 vote in the Senate. In September 2018, the FBI’s weeklong investigation of the sexual assault allegations against Brett Kavanaugh, then President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, left millions of Americans feeling unsatisfied, even more questions unanswered, and a slew of testimonies unexplored.

Through fly-on-the-wall reporting and exclusive interviews with classmates, friends, and colleagues, New York Times reporters Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly fill in the blanks with a deeply reported account of the events leading to the explosive confirmation hearing in their new book: "The Education Of Brett Kavanaugh: An Investigation."

Robin Pogrebin is a reporter on the New York Times' Culture Desk, where she covers the art world and cultural institutions, exploring the internal politics, finances and governance of museums, auction houses, galleries and performing arts organizations.

How do you raise a reader in this ever changing world of technology, devices and other distractions? Screen time may often be more appealing than reading time for a child. But with reading known to be so important, how can a parent encourage kids to make reading a priority?

In the new book, "How to Raise a Reader," leading book authorities Pamela Paul - who oversees all book coverage at the New York Times, and Maria Russo - editor of children’s books at the Times - answer these urgent questions.

The book is divided into 4 stages of childhood—from babies to teens—and filled with practical tips, strategies that work, been-there wisdom, and inspirational advice.

Casey Cep’s “Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud and the Last Trial of Harper Lee,” looks at the dual mysteries of a notorious crime and a famous novelist’s attempt to write about it.

Cep brings the story to life, from the shocking murders to the courtroom drama to the racial politics of the Deep South. At the same time, she offers a portrait of Harper Lee and her struggle with fame.

Dr. Alan Chartock
Eric Korenman

WAMC's Dr. Alan Chartock discusses President Trump's ongoing criticism of the New York Times, after the newspaper reported Saturday that many aspects of the president's deal to avoid tariffs with Mexico were agreed to months beforehand. 

Pamela Paul, editor of The New York Times Book Review, was in Albany, New York in April for an event with the New York State Writers Institute.

Paul has been a contributor to Time magazine and a columnist for Worth. She also originated and wrote the Studied column in The New York Times Sunday Styles section. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Washington Post, The Economist, Vogue, Slate and more.

Her memoir, "My Life with Bob: Flawed Heroine Keeps Book of Books, Plot Ensues," tells the story of "Bob," Paul's book of books, a journal she started when she was 17 years old exchange student living in France, recording every book she has read since the summer of 1988. She first wrote about Bob in a 2012 essay in The New York Times.

David McCraw is the top newsroom lawyer for the New York Times during the most turbulent era for journalism in generations. In short: if you've read a controversial story in the paper since the Bush administration, it went across his desk first.

McCraw is at the center of the paper's decisions about what news is fit to print. His new book is "Truth in Our Times."

David McCraw
New York Times

David McGraw serves as deputy general counsel at the New York Times, a job he also held at the Daily News before coming to the paper of record in 2002. In addition to teaching at NYU School of Law and Harvard Law School, McGraw is the author of a new book that is getting a lot of attention in these news war days: Truth In Our Times: Inside the Fight for Press Freedom in the Age of Alternative Facts. McGraw is  a graduate of Albany Law School. He’ll return to campus for a discussion and book signing on Wednesday at 3 p.m.

John Leland is a reporter at The New York Times, where he wrote a yearlong series that became the basis for the book "Happiness Is a Choice You Make," and the author of two previous books, "Hip: The History" and "Why Kerouac Matters: The Lessons of “On the Road” (They’re Not What You Think)." Before joining the Times, he was a senior editor at Newsweek, editor in chief of Details, a reporter at Newsday, and a writer and editor at Spin magazine.

In 2015, when the award-winning journalist John Leland set out on behalf of The New York Times to meet members of America’s fastest-growing age group, he anticipated learning of challenges, of loneliness, and of the deterioration of body, mind, and quality of life. But the elders he met took him in an entirely different direction.

Despite disparate backgrounds and circumstances, they each lived with a surprising lightness and contentment. The reality Leland encountered upended contemporary notions of aging, revealing the late stages of life as unexpectedly rich and the elderly as incomparably wise.

This morning we look at the year on Broadway 2018 and it was quite a year. Movie properties were plentiful: "Mean Girls," "Pretty Woman," "Frozen" and even "King Kong." The ever-persistent juke-box musical form came from the songs of Cher, Donna Summer and The Go-Go’s.

There was lots of star power - Kerry Washington, Bryan Cranson, Chris Evans, Laurie Metcalf, Andrew Garfield, Armie Hammer and Elaine May - just to name a few.

And, there were amazing transfers from London that landed on Broadway and have made an impact: "Harry Potter & the Cursed Child," the National Theatre productions of "Network" and "Angels in America" as well and the Jez Butterworth powerhouse "The Ferryman."

There is nobody better to discuss the year on Broadway with than Ben Brantley. Ben is the co-chief theater critic of The New York Times, filing reviews regularly from London as well as New York City, and Regional theatres.

The New York Times Is taking a look at their history of politics and the stories they have covered over 167 years. They do so in the new book, "The New York Times Book of Politics: 167 Years of Covering the State of the Union."

The book is edited by Andrew Rosenthal former editorial page editor of The New York Times who oversaw the editorial board, letters and op ed departments, and the editorials and op ed departments of the Times website. In March of 2016 he became a columnist and podcast contributor for The Times. 

Kwame Anthony Appiah pens The Ethicist column for the New York Times. He is the author of the prize-winning "Cosmopolitanism" among many other works. Appiah is a philosophy and law professor at NYU. The latest work from Kwame Anthony Appiah is, "The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity". Where he delves beneath the multitudinous obsession with identity whether by creed, country, color, class, or culture.

Ben Brantley, the New York Times Chief Theater Critic, will discuss the current state of Broadway theater and his approach to reviews at the upcoming Columbia County Habitat fall brunch on November 4.

Brantley has been with the The New York Times since 1993, filing reviews regularly from London as well as New York. He has notably reviewed "Hamilton," "Chicago," and "The Book of Mormon," among countless other productions.

Alan Chartock

WAMC's Dr. Alan Chartock shares his thoughts on the expected testimony of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's accuser on Thursday. Dr. Chartock also discusses a New York Times article and the possibility of a "blue wave" in November's elections in New York.

syringe
ZaldyImg/Flickr

For over a year, officials in Vermont’s most populous county and the state have been considering the possibility of creating safe injection sites as a means to curb the growing opioid crisis.  This week, U.S. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein wrote that such plans are not solutions and the Department of Justice is ready to act against communities that create such facilities.  The move is not deterring efforts in Burlington.

The small village of Norwich, Vermont, has an unusual knack for creating Olympians. Despite only having about three thousand residents, they have sent an athlete to nearly every Winter Olympics in the past thirty years, and three times the athlete has returned with a medal.

But according to our next guest, this unusually high success rate is not the result of tiger moms and eagle dads – it’s the result of a community culture of supportive, hands-off parenting that encourages children to enjoy themselves and try everything, without any emphasis on winning.

Karen Crouse is an award-winning New York Times reporter who stumbled upon this quiet village that has the secret to not only raising better athletes, but happier and healthier kids. Her new book is "Norwich: One Tiny Vermont Town’s Secret to Happiness and Excellence."

James Barron is a reporter for the New York Times, where his writing has appeared in virtually every section of the paper. He is the author of Piano: The Making of a Steinway Concert Grand, and he also edited The New York Times Book of New York.

His new book is new book is The One-Cent Magenta: Inside the Quest to Own the Most Valuable Stamp in the World. 

When it was issued in 1856, it cost a penny. In 2014, this tiny square of faded red paper sold at Sotheby’s for nearly $9.5 million, the largest amount ever paid for a postage stamp at auction. Through the stories of the eccentric characters who have bought, owned, and sold the one-cent magenta in the years in between, James Barron delivers a tale of global history and immense wealth, and of the human desire to collect.

Fred R. Conrad

Paul Krugman is the Distinguished Professor of Economics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and an op-ed columnist for The New York Times. He was the recipient of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Economics.

This past Sunday, after a screening of the Academy Award winning 1976 film, All The President’s Men, Krugman joined Alan Chartock at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, MA as part of the Berkshire International Film Festival for a conversation about current events and The Trump Administration. 

Trip Gabriel of the New York Times
Trip Gabriel

Longtime New York Times reporter Trip Gabriel covered the presidential election last year. In recent months, he’s been heading to red states to report on the people there and how they feel. The paper recently ran an eye-opening series on long-haul truck drivers. Young and old alike expressed ambivalence about a career that keeps them away from home for long stretches — with a close eye on the clock. Gabriel spoke with WAMC’s Ian Pickus.

Helene Cooper is the Pulitzer Prize–winning Pentagon correspondent for The New York Times, having previously served as White House Correspondent, diplomatic correspondent, and the assistant editorial page editor. Prior to moving to the Times, Helene spent twelve years as a reporter and foreign correspondent at The Wall Street Journal.

She is the author of the bestselling memoir, The House at Sugar Beach (Simon & Schuster, 2008). Her new book, Madame President: The Extraordinary Journey of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf will be featured on The Book Show in the near future. In this interview we speak with her about current events and what it's like to be at The Pentagon in the early weeks of the Trump Administration.

New York Times Foreign Affairs Columnist Thomas L. Friedman will give a presentation entitled "The Big Trends Shaping the World Today: Economics, Technology, and Geopolitics" at Proctors in Schenectady, NY on February 9th at 8 p.m. The event is presented by Union College.

Friedman is renowned for his direct reporting and sophisticated analysis of complex issues facing the world. His New York Times bestseller, co-written with Michael Mandelbaum, is That Used to Be Us: How America Fell Behind in the World It Invented and How We Can Come Back.

Friedman's The World is Flat sold over four million copies and won the inaugural Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award. In 2012, Friedman updated his National Book Award-winner, From Beirut to Jerusalem, adding a fresh discussion of the Arab Awakenings and Arab/Israeli relations in a new preface and afterword. His latest book, Thank You For Being Late, was released in Fall 2016.

In September 1998, Claudia Rowe was a young reporter working as a stringer for the New York Times in Poughkeepsie, New York when local police, confounded by two years of missing-women reports, discovered eight decayed bodies stashed in the home where Kendall Francois lived with his mother, father and teenage sister.

The corpses were found only after Kendall, a polite twenty-seven-year-old, confessed while being booked for something far more routine. He fit few traditional descriptions of a serial murderer, and many in Poughkeepsie struggled to comprehend how this “gentle giant” could be responsible for such brutality.

Reaching out after Kendall’s arrest, Rowe began an intense four-year conversation with the killer through letters, phone calls and face-to-face meetings. Rowe writes about this in her new book, The Spider And The Fly: A Reporter, A Serial Killer, And The Meaning Of Murder.

Claudia Rowe is a staff writer at The Seattle Times and has twice been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. 

Photo of Clinton Correctional
Pat Bradley/WAMC

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has told the state inspector general to launch an investigation into racial bias in the state prison system following an investigation by the New York Times. Prison advocates say the article has highlighted long-known facts, but critics say many of the accusations are based on hearsay.

  The New York Times columnist  Maureen Dowd has covered Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton since the '90s.

Trapped between two candidates with the highest recorded unfavorables, Americans are plunged into The Year of Voting Dangerously. In this perilous and shocking campaign season, Dowd traces the psychologies and pathologies in one of the nastiest and most significant battles of the sexes ever.

  In The Boys in the Bunkhouse: Servitude and Salvation in the Heartland, New York Times writer and columnist Dan Barry tells the harrowing yet uplifting story of the exploitation and abuse of a resilient group of men with intellectual disability, and the heroic efforts of those who helped them to find justice and reclaim their lives.

In the tiny Iowa farm town of Atalissa, dozens of men, all with intellectual disability and all from Texas, lived in an old schoolhouse. Before dawn each morning, they were bussed to a nearby processing plant, where they eviscerated turkeys in return for food, lodging, and $65 a month. They lived in near servitude for more than thirty years, enduring increasing neglect, exploitation, and physical and emotional abuse—until state social workers, local journalists, and one tenacious labor lawyer helped these men achieve freedom.

Zika: The Emerging Epidemic book cover
Zika: The Emerging Epidemic

We've all heard plenty about the Zika virus by now, but it's hard to know how worried to be. What are our chances of getting it? Should we postpone travel plans? Donald G. McNeil Jr. is a science writer for the New York Times, and he attempts to answer those questions and more in his new book Zika: The Emerging Epidemic.

  Best known of award-winning New York Times and Newsweek columns, Anna Quindlen returns with her eighth novel, Miller's Valley. 

The setting is a farming valley in Pennsylvania during the height of the Viet Nam War. Outside influences like the war and a government plan to flood the valley affect the lives of one family - and the community.

  Rev. Christopher Hedges, Ph.D. will be the keynote speaker at The Capital Region Theological Center's Money & Power Symposium this Saturday at the Radisson Hotel on Wolf Road in Albany, NY.

Chris Hedges, whose column is published weekly on Truthdig, has written 11 books, including the New York Times best seller Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt. He was part of the team of reporters at The New York Times awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 2002 for the paper’s coverage of global terrorism. He also received the Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism in 2002. In 2014, Chris Hedges was ordained as a minister at the Second Presbyterian Church.

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