new orleans

Ellis Marsalis
ellismarsalis.com

Internationally acclaimed trumpeter, composer, bandleader, and educator Wynton Marsalis brings the Wynton Marsalis Quintet to the Koussevitzky Music Shed at Tanglewood in Lenox, Massachusetts on Saturday, September 1, at 7 p.m., as part of the closing weekend of the 2018 Tanglewood season.

The concert will also include a very special guest performance by the Ellis Marsalis Quintet, featuring the patriarch of the Marsalis family, New Orleans-based modern jazz pianist Ellis Marsalis. As a leading educator at several universities, Ellis Marsalis has influenced the careers of countless musicians, including his four musician sons: Wynton, Branford, Delfeayo, and Jason.

Ellis Marsalis joins us.

Harry Connick Jr.
Gavin Bond

Harry Connick Jr.'s career has exemplified excellence across multiple platforms in the entertainment world. He has received Grammy and Emmy awards as well as Tony nominations for his live and recorded musical performances, his achievements in film and television and his appearances on Broadway as both an actor and a composer.

The foundation of Connick's art is the music of his native New Orleans, where he began performing as a pianist and vocalist at the age of 5 and he will bring his New Orleans Tricentennial Celebration Tour to Tanglewood in Lenox, MA on Saturday, June 23.

Jon Batiste
Sasha Isreal

On Sunday, June 24th Jon Batiste will perform with The Dap-Kings at the Freihofer’s Saratoga Jazz Festival at SPAC.

Batiste was born into a musical family in Louisiana, he studied at Julliard, attended the Skidmore Jazz Institute, his band, Stay Human, is the house band for The Late Show with Stephen Colbert -- and he’s the Co-Artistic Director at-large for the National Jazz Museum in Harlem.

  Natural disasters don't matter for the reasons we think they do. They generally don't kill a huge number of people. Most years more people kill themselves than are killed by Nature's tantrums. And using standard measures like Gross Domestic Product (GDP) it is difficult to show that disasters significantly interrupt the economy.

It's what happens after the disasters that really matters-when the media has lost interest and the last volunteer has handed out a final blanket, and people are left to repair their lives. What happens is a stark expression of how unjustly unequal our world has become. The elite make out well-whether they belong to an open market capitalist democracy or a closed authoritarian socialist state.

In The Disaster Profiteers, John Mutter argues that when no one is looking, disasters become a means by which the elite prosper at the expense of the poor.

  On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina's monstrous winds and surging water overwhelmed the protective levees around low-lying New Orleans, Louisiana. Eighty percent of the city flooded, in some places under twenty feet of water. Property damages across the Gulf Coast topped $100 billion. One thousand eight hundred and thirty-three people lost their lives.

Don Brown tells the story through words and illustration in Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans.

  After seven years of service as the president of Tulane University, Scott Cowen watched the devastation of his beloved New Orleans at the hands of Hurricane Katrina.

When federal, state, and city officials couldn't find their way to decisive action, Cowen, known for his gutsy leadership, quickly partnered with a coalition of civic, business, and nonprofit leaders looking to work around the old institutions to revitalize and transform New Orleans.

    Inspired by David Simon's award-winning HBO series Treme, Treme: Stories and Recipes from the Heart of New Orleans by Lolis Eric Elie, is a celebration of the culinary spirit of post-Katrina New Orleans features recipes and tributes from the characters, real and fictional, who highlight the Crescent City's rich foodways.

5/13/13 - Panel

May 13, 2013

Topics:

IRS v. Tea Party
Stock Market Momentum
Smart Phone Thefts
New Orleans Parade Shooting

Steve Wilson / Flickr

NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- New Orleans has celebrated plenty of milestones on its slow road to recovery from Hurricane Katrina, but arguably none is bigger than hosting its first Super Bowl since the 2005 storm left the city in shambles.

To see the remnants of Katrina's destruction, fans coming to town for Sunday's game will have to stray from the French Quarter and the downtown corridor where the Superdome is located. Even in the neighborhoods that bore the brunt of the storm, many of the most glaring scars have faded over time.

This week marks the seventh anniversary of one of the country's deadliest hurricanes. New Orleans and the Gulf Coast are still recovering from the devastating damage and loss of life caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita — the storm that would follow.