nature

Susan Hand Shetterly has written about wildlife and wetlands for more than thirty years, in both articles and books, including "Settled in the Wild," a collection of essays.

In "Seaweed Chronicles," Shetterly takes readers deep into the world of this essential organism by providing an immersive, often poetic look at life on the rugged shores of her beloved Gulf of Maine, where the growth and harvesting of seaweed is becoming a major industry.

While examining the life cycle of seaweed and its place in the environment, she tells the stories of the men and women who farm and harvest it and who are fighting to protect this critical species against forces both natural and man-made.

Christopher White has written numerous books, including "Skipjack: The Story of America’s Last Sailing Oystermen" and "The Melting World: A Journey Across America’s Vanishing Glaciers." His articles have appeared in Audubon, The Baltimore Sun, The New Mexican, National Geographic, and Exploration.

In his new book, "The Last Lobster: Boom or Bust for Maine's Greatest Fishery?" he follows three lobster captains: Frank, Jason, and Julie (one the few female skippers in Maine), as they haul and set thousands of traps.

For the past five years, the lobster population along the coast of Maine has boomed, resulting in a lobster harvest six times the size of the record catch from the 1980s an event unheard of in fisheries. In a detective story, scientists and fishermen explore various theories for the glut. Leading contenders are a sudden lack of predators and a recent wedge of warming waters, which may disrupt the reproductive cycle, a consequence of climate change. Unexpectedly, boom may turn to bust, as the captains must fight a warming ocean, volatile prices, and rough weather to keep their livelihood afloat.

The Flying Deer Nature Center in New Lebanon, New York is a wilderness school and community dedicated to mentoring children, adults, and families in deep connection to nature, self, and others.

Their educators guide people of all ages in nature immersion and education. Michelle Apland is the Executive Director of Flying Deer Nature Center.

Ink bottles - one part of Kazumi Tanaka's "INK: The Color of Manitoga"
www.visitmanitoga.org

Manitoga is the house, studio, and 75-acre woodland garden of American industrial designer Russel Wright. Its Artist Residency program began in 2014. This summer’s residency project is entitled “INK: The Color of Manitoga” by artist Kazumi Tanaka. Tanaka is creating natural inks from plant specimens she collects in Manitoga’s woodland garden. Her lab and art space is in the main house at Manitoga.

Tanaka was born in Osaka, Japan and graduated from Osaka University before relocating to New York. She lives and works in Beacon, NY and her art has been shown all around the world. Manitoga’s Executive Director Allison Cross and Kazumia Tanaka join us.

Manitoga’s Member Opening Celebration and the official Artist Residency launch will take place tomorrow from 5 to 7 p.m. Information about that event and ongoing hikes and tours and other special events is available here.

National Book Award winning author Richard Powers spent a year under the redwoods of California.

That reflection led to his new novel, “The Overstory,” about the world of trees and a band of people determined to change the way it’s perceived.

The last time our tech guru Jesse Feiler was here he talked with us about Blockchains and Cryptocurrency. This morning he lightens the mood and shares with us about ideas for Spring Walks in our listening area.

Friends of Saranac River Trail will be holding its first-ever Jane’s Walk, a walking conversation to explore and celebrate Downtown Plattsburgh, on May 5 from at 10 a.m - 11:30 a.m.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, author, and consultant specializing in small business and nonprofit organizations. His most recent books are “The Nonprofit Risk Book: Finding and Managing Risk in Nonprofits and NGOs” written with Gail B. Nayowith and “Learn Computer Science with Swift.” His most recent apps are “CyberContinuity,” a free app to learn about your vulnerabilities and “The Nonprofit Risk App,” a companion to the book.

Luke Cyphers who is on the board of the Clinton County Historical Association also joins us. Luke Cyphers is an award-winning freelance journalist and current contributing writer for Adirondack Life magazine, a former a senior editor at ESPN The Magazine, and former sports writer for the New York Daily News, among other outlets. A resident of the City of Plattsburgh, he is a trustee of the Clinton County Historical Association and past chair of the Saranac River Trail Advisory Committee.

Berkshire Botanical Garden’s annual Winter Lecture marks its 21st year with an illustrated talk, “The New Shade Garden: Creating a Lush Oasis in the Age of Climate Change” presented by lecturer, photographer and author Ken Druse. The event will be held on Saturday, January 13, 2 p.m. at Lenox Memorial High School.

Called “the guru of natural gardening” by The New York Times, Druse is best known for his twenty garden books published over the last twenty-five years. The American Horticultural Society listed his first large-format work, The Natural Garden," among the best books of all time.

In 2013, the Smithsonian Institute announced the acquisition of the Ken Druse Collection of Garden Photography comprising 100,000 images of American gardens and plants.

The Quarry Pond at Manitoga
Sarah LaDuke

Mid-century designer Russel Wright’s historic home, studio, and woodland grounds, Manitoga, is located in Garrison, NY. This Saturday, Manitoga presents its annual outdoor performance.

Created by Suzanne Thorpe, Resonance & Resemblance is a sonic performance and meditation created for Manitoga and supported in part by grants from the MAP Fund and New Music USA. The event is sold-out.

Suzanne Thorpe composes site-oriented sound works that use a variety of media and technology, and performs on the electroacoustic flute, expanded with digital and analog tools. Thorpe is a former member of indie rock band Mercury Rev and is currently a PhD candidate in Music/Integrative Studies at University of California San Diego, and Co-Director of TECHNE

In The Quarry Fox and Other Critters of the Wild Catskills, naturalist Leslie Sharpe trains her eye and narrative gifts on these and other New York wildlife through her tales of close observations as a naturalist living in the Great Western Catskills.

The Quarry Fox is the first in-depth study of Catskill wildlife since John Burroughs invented the genre of nature-writing, in which Sharpe weaves her experiences with the seasons, plants, and creatures with the natural history of each organism, revealing their sensitivity to and resilience against the splendor and cruelty of Nature.

The Quarry Fox is a celebration of the natural world and our place in it. Leslie Sharpe will be giving a presentation, Q&A and book-signing at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck, New York tonight at 6PM. 

In 2005, beekeepers in the United States began observing a mysterious and disturbing phenomenon: once-healthy colonies of bees were suddenly collapsing, leaving behind empty hives full of honey and pollen. 

Vanishing Bees takes us inside the debates over widespread honeybee deaths, introducing the various groups with a stake in solving the mystery of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), including beekeepers, entomologists, growers, agrichemical companies, and government regulators. Drawing from extensive interviews and first-hand observations, Sainath Suryanarayanan and Daniel Lee Kleinman examine how members of each group have acquired, disseminated, and evaluated knowledge about CCD.

When archaeologists ventured into a thick Honduran rainforest in 2015, they were searching in an unexplored valley for the remnants of a long-lost city. Legend had it that an ancient metropolis was buried under centuries worth of jungle growth.

Best-selling author Douglas Preston went along on the expedition. The archaeologists Preston followed had the advantage of detailed survey maps to guide them to precise locations. Three years earlier, scientists had deployed advanced LIDAR (Light Imaging, Detection, And Ranging) technology to peer through the rainforest canopy to reveal a sprawling ancient metropolis.

Preston has detailed the experience in a new book The Lost City of the Monkey God: A True Story.

For centuries scientists have written off cannibalism as a bizarre phenomenon with little biological significance. Its presence in nature was dismissed as a desperate response to starvation or other life-threatening circumstances, and few spent time studying it. A taboo subject in our culture, the behavior was portrayed mostly through horror movies or tabloids sensationalizing the crimes of real-life flesh-eaters. But the true nature of cannibalism--the role it plays in evolution as well as human history--is even more intriguing (and more normal) than the misconceptions we’ve come to accept as fact.

In Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History,zoologist Bill Schutt sets the record straight, debunking common myths and investigating our new understanding of cannibalism’s role in biology, anthropology, and history in the most fascinating account yet written on this complex topic.

  Parasites are tiny organisms can only live inside another animal, and they have many evolutionary motives for manipulating their host’s behavior. Far more often than appreciated, these puppeteers orchestrate the interplay between predator and prey.

We humans are hardly immune to the profound influence of parasites. Kathleen McAuliffe's book is This Is Your Brain on Parasites: How Tiny Creatures Manipulate Our Behavior and Shape Society.

  Many childhood summers, Mark Woods piled into a station wagon with his parents and two sisters and headed to America's national parks. Mark’s most vivid childhood memories are set against a backdrop of mountains, woods, and fireflies in places like Redwood, Yosemite, and Grand Canyon national parks.

On the eve of turning fifty and a little burned-out, Mark decided to reconnect with the great outdoors. He'd spend a year visiting the national parks. He planned to take his mother to a park she'd not yet visited and to re-create his childhood trips with his wife and their iPad-generation daughter.

But then the unthinkable happened: his mother was diagnosed with cancer, given just months to live. Mark had initially intended to write a book about the future of the national parks, but Lassoing the Sun grew into something more: a book about family, the parks, the legacies we inherit and the ones we leave behind.

The Flying Deer Nature Center in New Lebanon, NY is a non-profit wilderness school and community dedicated to mentoring children, youth, adults, and families in deep connection to nature, self, and others.

In September they are starting a program entitled: Awakening Wild: Nature Immersion for Adults. Awakening Wild will meet one weekend a month, September to May, and will offer an ongoing experience of fun, exciting nature immersion to awaken senses, bolster sense of comfort and confidence in the woods, and strengthen connection with the natural world.

  Ted Elliman has been engaged in botanical work in New England and other northeastern states for over 30 years. He is a plant ecologist for the New England Wild Flower Society in Framingham, Massachusetts. Previously, he worked as an ecologist for the National Park Service and has written numerous articles on botanical subjects for conservation organizations, scientific journals, and state and federal environmental agencies.

His new book, Wildflowers of New England, is for hikers, naturalists, gardeners, and anyone wishing to learn more about the regions diverse wildflowers, or just wanting to know the answer to "What’s that plant?"

Ted will lead a wildflower walk and sign copies of his new book at Manitoga: The Russel Wright Design Center in Garrison, NY this Sunday, June 5th from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

  In the late 1970s, the bald eagle and the peregrine falcon were heading toward extinction, victims of the combined threats of DDT, habitat loss, and lax regulation. Flight Paths tells the story of how a small group of New York biologists raced against nature’s clock to bring these two beloved birds back from the brink in record-setting numbers.

McGrath documents both rescue projects in never-before-published detail. At Cornell University, a team of scientists worked to crack the problem of how to breed peregrine falcons in captivity and then restore them to the wild. Meanwhile, two young, untested biologists tackled the overwhelming assignment of rebuilding the bald eagle population from the state’s last nesting pair, one of whom (the female) was sterile.

Darryl McGrath is a journalist who has written about upstate New York’s environment and rural regions for over twenty years.

  The Olana Partnership is presenting an illustrated lecture and book signing with acclaimed author Andrea Wulf at Hudson High School on Saturday, April 9 at 4pm. The event will be Wulf’s first East Coast stop on her United States and UK tour.

The Invention of Nature is Andrea Wulf’s newest her award winning biography that reveals the extraordinary life of the visionary German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt and how he created the way we understand nature today.

Perceiving nature as an interconnected global force, he turned scientific observation into poetic narrative, and inspired Frederic Church on numerous levels. Andrea Wulf joins us to talk about the book and her upcoming event.

  A long weekend of films, receptions, Q&A with filmmakers, hikes, and more are planned for Glimmerglass Film Days, November 5-9 in Cooperstown, NY. “Sacred Places” is the theme of the third annual festival, curated by central New York native Margaret Parsons, founder and director of the film program at the National Gallery of Art.

The selected films explore places of natural and cultural significance, around the world and close to home. Filmmakers and experts in their field will be on hand throughout the event to introduce films and answer questions, enriching the audience’s experience. The Festival also will feature shorts from the Black Maria Film Festival, and receptions with local foods and locally crafted brews and spirits.

  As written and read by Joe Donahue:

I was obsessed with books, even as a kid. And my favorites were those by A.A. Milne about a very special bear – Winnie-the Pooh. As an adult, I became obsessed with the place where Pooh, Christopher Robin, and their friends live and play. The Hundred Acre Wood—the setting for Winnie-the-Pooh’s adventures—was inspired by Ashdown Forest, a wildlife haven that spans more than 6,000 acres in southeast England.

I went trekking through the forest last December – one of the most meaningful adventures I have ever been on. So, when I first learned of Kathryn Aalto’s new book - The Natural World of Winnie-the-Pooh – I felt like it was written just for me.

In the pages of the book you can visit the ancient black walnut tree on the edge of the forest that became Pooh’s house, go deep into the pine trees to find Poohsticks Bridge, and climb up to the top of the enchanted Galleons Lap, where Pooh says goodbye to Christopher Robin.

Five Rivers Environmental Education Center

A $7 million overhaul is getting started after a groundbreaking Thursday at the Five Rivers Environmental Education Center in Delmar.


  This Friday and Saturday, the The Thorn Preserve in Woodstock, NY will have a bioblitz.

A bioblitz is a community event designed to quickly compile information on biodiversity in a relatively small area. Community members participate in the events alongside trained naturalists and scientists to find and identify as many species of plants and animals as possible in, generally, a period of 24 – 36 hours.

The Thorn Preserve is owned by The Catskill Center and is comprised of 60 beautiful acres in the heart of Woodstock. Thorn Preserve is operated in partnership with Woodstock Land Conservancy.

  Artist James Gurney is one of our favorite guests. He is best known for his illustrated book series Dinotopia. He specializes in painting realistic images of scenes that can’t be photographed, from dinosaurs to ancient civilizations. His new art instruction video is “Watercolor in the Wild.”

Plus, Dinotopia: The Fantastical Art of James Gurney - an exhibition of original oil paintings from The New York Times bestselling Dinotopia series – will be opening on Valentine’s Day at the Stamford Museum and Nature Center in Stamford, CT.

  Over half of the world's wildlife has disappeared over the last 40 years. Paul Rosolie - a naturalist and conservationist who lives and works in the Mother of God region of the Amazon, one of the most remote areas of the rain forest - has dedicated his life to helping restore the balance.

This past summer Rosalie was swallowed by a giant anaconda - to bring attention to the region he loves. The television special detailing the journey into (and back out of the snake) will air on The Discovery Channel on Sunday, December 7th.

    Diane Ackerman is the author of the books: One Hundred Names for Love, A Natural History of the Senses, and The Zookeeper's Wife. In her latest book, The Human Age, she offers some optimism for our planet and explores the ways people are shaping the modern world, and argues for a new understanding of our relationship with the environment and our own bodies.

    Manitoga in Garrison New York is a National Historic Site - it was the estate and modernist home of industrial designer Russel Wright.

The inspiring artistic space has a residency program and one of Manitoga’s 2014 Artists in Residence is Melissa McGill. Her work primarily incorporates drawing, sculpture, and sound to explore the space between absence and presence. Palmas is her work at Manitoga. It is a site-specific surround sound installation that activates Manitoga’s Quarry Pool and encircling paths by playing recordings of rhythmic clapping inspired by the clapping - the Palmas - of Flamenco music.

  

  With a poet’s eye and naturalist’s affinity for wild places, Kathleen Jamie reports from the field in a collection of fourteen essays in her book, Sightlines, which has won the 2014 Orion Book Award for Non-Fiction.

Jamie roams her native Scottish byways and hills and sails north to encounter whalebones and icebergs. Interweaving personal history with her scrutiny of landscape, she dissects whatever her gaze falls upon from vistas of cells beneath a hospital microscope, to orcas rounding a headland, to the aurora borealis lighting up the frozen sea.

  Located in Olivebridge, New York on 374-acres of Catskill forests, streams and farmland, Ashokan Center is a special blend of geologic, natural and human history. Our mission is to teach, inspire and build community through shared experiences in nature, history, and the arts.

And this Summer they’ll be busy! They’re having a Swing Dance and BBQ this Saturday, hosting a Western and Swing week, a guitar camp, and a Seeger Tribute Dance & Sing – all of that now and into the first half of July! Their Summer Hoot is August 22nd-24th.

Gina Gould is the Executive Director of Ashokan Center and she joins us now along with our friend Jay Ungar and Molly Mason.

    Designer Russel Wright (1904 to 1976) revolutionized the American home through his contribution of inexpensive, mass produced dinnerware, furniture, appliances, and textiles.

  His home, studio, and woodland garden - collectively called Manitoga - are located in Garrison, NY. Manitoga is a National Historic Landmark, an Affiliate Site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and a World Monuments Watch Site. It is one of the few 20th century modern homes open to the public in New York State.

Here we speak with Allison Cross, the Executive Director of Manitoga.

Flying Deer Day 6/21

Jun 13, 2014

  Flying Deer Nature Center in New Lebanon, NY has been mentoring children, teens, and families in the ways of the earth since 1995.

FDNC has distinguished itself through the creativity of its programs and its deep connections to nature. Programs operated by Flying Deer include wilderness adventures for women, weekly wilderness mentoring for boys, single gender adolescent rite of passage programs, and co-ed programs for homeschoolers.

Flying Deer also operates school-based nature studies programs at local public and private schools. Summer camp programs include nature-based fantasy adventures, canoe trips, day camps, backpacking, camping, and family over-nites.

Pages