memory

Patricia S. Churchland is the author of "Conscience: The Origins of Moral Intuition" and "Touching a Nerve: Our Brains, Our Selves." She is professor emerita of philosophy at the University of California, San Diego, and the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship.

In "Touching a Nerve," Churchland, the distinguished founder of neurophilosophy, drew from scientific research on the brain to understand its philosophical and ethical implications for identity, consciousness, free will, and memory. In "Conscience," she explores how moral systems arise from our physical selves in combination with environmental demands. All social groups have ideals for behavior, even though ethics vary among different cultures and among individuals within each culture.

What if you had the chance to listen to living Holocaust survivors?

SageArts local songwriters and creative arts facilitators met with local survivors and their caregivers to compose songs and craft meaningful pieces of art – including masks, collages, prints and paintings – based on the themes that emerged from their conversations. This spring, they'll share these powerful pieces in an event that highlights the healing power of the arts.

“Honoring Holocaust Survivors: A Concert of Resilience and Hope” will be held on May 5th at 1:00 p.m. at Mount Saint Mary College in Newburgh. The entire Hudson Valley community is invited to join Jewish Family Service of Orange County in honoring survivors.

To tell us more we welcome: Elise Gold, Executive Director of Jewish Family Service of Orange County; Julie Last, Musical Director of SageArts; and Jude Roberts, Songwriter of SageArts.

David Baldacci is a global #1 bestselling author, and one of the world's favorite storytellers. His works have been adapted for both feature film and television. David Baldacci is also the cofounder, along with his wife, of the Wish You Well Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting literacy efforts across America.

Amos Decker is the Memory Man. Following a football-related head injury that altered his personality, Decker is now unable to forget even the smallest detail which is as much a curse as it is a blessing. In Baldacci's gripping new thriller, "The Fallen," Decker's life might be about to change again.

Echo/Archive At EMPAC

Mar 1, 2018
George MacLeod
George MacLeod / echo-archive.com

A big premiere is happening Friday night at EMPAC.

Choreographer Elena Demyanenko and filmmaker Erika Mijlin’s collaboration Echo/Archive, which has been developed in residence over this past year, is a live dance and film project which features female performers across three generations and focuses on “bodily heritage,” or the way that movements are stored and communicated between bodies. Both artists teach at Bennington College. 

Filmmaker (and the lead video artist on Echo/Archive) Erika Mijlin and EMPAC’s Curator of Theater and Dance Ashley Ferro-Murray join us.

The Mystery Of Sleep

Feb 28, 2018

We spend a third of our lives in bed, but how much do we really understand about how sleep affects us? In the past forty years, scientists have discovered that our sleep (or lack of it) can affect nearly every aspect of our waking lives. Poor sleep could be a sign of a disease, the result of a vitamin or iron deficiency, or the cause of numerous other problems, both sleeping and waking. Yet many people, even medical personnel, are unaware of the dangers of poor sleep.

Enter Dr. Meir Kryger, a world authority on the science of sleep, with a comprehensive guide to the mysteries of slumber that combines detailed case studies, helpful tables, illustrations, and pragmatic advice.

The book is The Mystery of Sleep: Why a Good Night's Rest Is Vital to a Better, Healthier Life.

In ancient, pre-literate cultures across the globe, tribal elders had encyclopedic memories. They could name all the animals and plants across a landscape, identify the stars in the sky, and recite the history of their people. Yet today, most of us struggle to memorize more than a short poem.

Using traditional Aboriginal Australian song lines as a starting point, Dr. Lynne Kelly has identified the powerful memory technique used by our ancestors and indigenous people around the world. In turn, she has then discovered that this ancient memory technique is the secret purpose behind the great prehistoric monuments like Stonehenge, which have puzzled archaeologists for so long.

Her book is The Memory Code: The Secrets of Stonehenge, Easter Island and Other Ancient Monuments.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

The number pi goes far beyond 3.14. In fact, the mathematical constant has an infinite number of digits after its decimal. On Wednesday morning a Greenwich man made an attempt to set a new world record for memorizing the first 10,000 digits of pi. WAMC’s Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard was there to see if he reached the record.

Lonni Sue Johnson was a renowned artist who regularly produced covers for The New Yorker, a gifted musician, a skilled amateur pilot, and a joyful presence to all who knew her. But in late 2007, she contracted encephalitis. The disease burned through her hippocampus like wildfire, leaving her severely amnesic, living in a present that rarely progresses beyond ten to fifteen minutes.

     Remarkably, she still retains much of the intellect and artistic skills from her previous life, but it's not at all clear how closely her consciousness resembles yours or mine. In The Perpetual Now: A Story of Amnesia, Memory, and Love, award-winning science journalist Michael D. Lemonick uses the unique drama of Lonni Sue Johnson's day-to-day life to give us a nuanced and intimate understanding of the science that lies at the very heart of human nature.

  In his new book, The Point Is: Making Sense of Birth, Death, and Everything in Between, Lee Eisenberg (bestselling author of The Number) dares to tackle nothing less than what it takes to find enduring meaning and purpose in life.

He explains how from a young age, each of us is compelled to take memories of events and relationships and shape them into a one-of-a-kind personal narrative. In addition to sharing his own memories, Eisenberg presents research culled from psychology and neuroscience, and draws on insights from a pantheon of thinkers and great writers-Tolstoy, Freud, Joseph Campbell, Virginia Woolf, among others -- as well as men and women of all ages who are wrestling with the demands of work and family, ever in search of fulfillment and satisfaction.

    

  David Baldacci’s books are published in over 45 languages and in more than 80 countries. They have been adapted for both feature film and television. David Baldacci is also the cofounder, along with his wife, of the Wish You Well Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting literacy efforts across America.

With over 110 million copies of his novels in print, David Baldacci is one of the most widely read storytellers in the world. Now he introduces a new character: a man with perfect memory who must solve his own family's murder.

Listener Essay - My Long Lost Friend

Jan 27, 2015

  

  Albert Stern's stories have appeared in the New York Times, Salon.com, Nerve.com, and the Jewish Daily Forward. He lives in Berkshire County, and works as a tutor, editor, and writing coach.

    Award-winning poet Jeanne Murray Walker tells an extraordinarily wise, witty, and quietly wrenching tale of her mother's long passage into dementia.

This powerful story explores parental love, profound grief, and the unexpected consolation of memory.