memoir | WAMC

memoir

Book cover for "Finish strong"
Penguin Press / Penguin Press

Nate Ebner is a two-sport athlete who is the only person to ever compete in the Olympics as an active NFL player and then gone on to win a Super Bowl. He has won 3 Super Bowls with the New England Patriots and participated in the 2016 Rio Olympic Games as one of twelve members of the United States Rugby team, and now plays for the New York Giants. In his youth, Ebner bonded with his father through rugby. After Ebner tragically lost his father, he kept his promise to him to walk onto the football team at Ohio State and make it in the NFL.

His memoir "Finish Strong" (written with Paul Daugherty) tells an astonishing story of what a father will do for a son and what a son will do for a father.

Book cover for "Laughing at Myself" by Dan Glickman
University Press of Kansas / University Press of Kansas

Dan Glickman was a Jewish kid from Kansas, son of self-made, entrepreneurial parents and a grandson of Russian and Eastern European immigrants. He ended up as a congressman, secretary of agriculture, and chief lobbyist for Hollywood. The big question is – how did that happen? Glickman joins us this morning to discuss his new book: "Laughing at Myself: My Education in Congress, on the Farm, and at the Movies."

Dan Glickman is a senior fellow at the Bipartisan Policy Center and an adjunct professor of agriculture and nutrition at Tufts University. He served for eighteen years in the US House of Representatives representing the 4th Congressional District of Kansas, as the US Secretary of Agriculture from (1995– 2001), and as chairman of the Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. (2004– 2010).

Book cover for "Punch Me Up To The Gods"
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Brian Broome is a poet and screenwriter, and K. Leroy Irvis Fellow and instructor in the Writing Program at the University of Pittsburgh. He has been a finalist in The Moth storytelling competition and won the grand prize in Carnegie Mellon University's Martin Luther King Writing Awards.

His debut memoir, “Punch Me Up to the Gods” is available today. It begins in his early years - growing up in Ohio as a dark-skinned Black boy harboring crushes on other boys. The book is framed around Gwendolyn Brooks’s poem “We Real Cool” and is earning rave reviews.

Dinah Yessne's first political act, as she recalls it, was spinning a homemade Wheel of Fortune at a fundraiser for presidential candidate Henry Wallace when she was three years old. From that auspicious beginning, she went on to champion the causes of her time: civil rights, peace, anti-war, women's rights, gay rights, economic equality, immigrant rights, and at one time or another she was tapped by Governor Madeline Kunin to run for State Office, endorsed by Congressman Bernie Sanders - and just plain ticked off one day presidential candidate,  Howard Dean. 

She tells the stories in her new book "Politically Defined: Memoir of an Unknown Activist."

Modified Book cover artwork for "The Secret to Superhuman Strenght" by Alison Bechdel
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Comics and cultural superstar Alison Bechdel is back and once again she has reinvented memoir, as she did with “Fun Home”, this time by telling her life story decade by decade through the lens of her lifelong obsession with exercise. Her new graphic memoir is “The Secret to Superhuman Strength.”

Book cover for "Marriage Story"
Scribd.com

Born and raised in Gloversville, New York, Pulitzer-Prize winning novelist Richard Russo returns to that place in his new Scribd essay, "Marriage Story: An American Memoir." The essay chronicles his parents’ lives and why their marriage foundered.

Ultimately, however, he asks a broader question: Is America going through its own breakup story? Can the divides between rich and poor, black and white, red and blue, educated and not, be overcome or are they irreconcilable differences that will end up pulling the nation apart?

Cover art for Laraine Newman's audible memoir
Audible.com

  From growing up in Los Angeles with movie star neighbors, bearing witness to the music scene in the 1960s and seeing the rise of comedy in the early 70s, to studying mime in Paris under the tutelage of Marcel Marceau to becoming a founding member of the seminal comedy troupe The Groundlings, it's no wonder that Lorne Michaels offered Laraine Newman a spot in the original cast of Saturday Night Live.

There, along with famous cast members John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd, Chevy Chase, Jane Curtain, Garret Morris, and Gilda Radner - Bill Murray was passed over at first and joined in a later season - Laraine was part of the show that changed TV - and comedy - forever. But it isn't all yuks and glamor. Laraine struggled with demons, arriving in New York City with an attraction to drugs that started as a vice and grew to be an all-consuming addiction - even as she skyrocketed to fame via her memorable characters on SNL

Book cover for "We Saw Scenery: The Early Diaries of Merrill Markoe"
Algonquin Books

In her first-ever graphic memoir, four-time Emmy-winning comedy writer Merrill Markoe unearths her treasured diaries, long kept under lock and key, to illustrate the hilarious story of her preteen and teen years and how she came to realize that her secret power was her humor. Her new book is: "We Saw Scenery: The Early Diaries of Merrill Markoe."

Wielding her layered and comically absurd style, Markoe takes readers back through her time as a Girl Scout, where she learned that “scouting” was really more about learning housewifery skills, to her earliest crushes on uniquely awful boys and her growing obsession with television.

Markoe was the head writer for the original The David Letterman Show (the live NBC morning show that was recognized with a Daytime Emmy Award) and the co-creator and first head writer of NBC’s groundbreaking Late Night with David Letterman, for which she won three additional Emmy Awards. She engineered the majority of the show’s original concepts and created the segments “Stupid Pet Tricks,” “Stupid Human Tricks,” and “Viewer Mail.”

She has written for television shows such as Sex and the CityNewhart, and Moonlighting and has written several bestselling books and was recently awarded the Paddy Chayevsky Laurel Award for Television Writing Achievement. 

Book cover for "I have been buried under years of dust"
William Morrow

These were the first words twenty-five-year-old Emily Grodin ever wrote. Born with nonverbal autism, Emily’s only means of communicating for a quarter of a century had been only one-word responses or physical gestures.

That Emily was intelligent had never been in question—from an early age she’d shown clear signs that she understood what was going on though she could not express herself. Her parents, Valerie and Tom, sought every therapy possible in the hope that Emily would one day be able to reveal herself. When this miraculous breakthrough occurred, Emily was finally able to give insight into the life, frustrations, and joys of a person with autism.

Told by Valerie, with insights and stories and poetry from Emily, "I Have Been Buried Under Years of Dust" highlights key moments of Emily’s childhood that led to her communication awakening—and how her ability rapidly accelerated after she wrote that first sentence.

Book cover for "The Luckiest Guy in the World"
Skyhorse

Robert Abrams, born and raised in the Bronx, went on to become a crusading attorney general of New York from 1979 to 1993. As a reformer, he battled political machine bosses and special interests, winning landmark victories for consumers, protecting the environment, and a woman’s right to choose. He led attorneys general across the nation to protect the rights of all Americans.

He recounts his life and experiences in his new book, "The Luckiest Guy in the World: My Journey in Politics."

Growing up on Cape Cod in the 1960s, Liza Rodman was a lonely little girl. During the summers, while her mother worked days in a local motel and danced most nights in the Provincetown bars, her babysitter—the kind, handsome handyman at the motel where her mother worked—took her and her sister on adventures in his truck.

He bought them popsicles and together, they visited his “secret garden” in the Truro woods. To Liza, he was one of the few kind and understanding adults in her life. Everyone thought he was just a “great guy.” But there was one thing she didn’t know; their babysitter was a serial killer.

Liza never made the connection between her friendly babysitter and the infamous killer of numerous women, including four in Massachusetts, until decades later. The Babysitter reveals the chilling and unforgettable true story of a charming but brutal psychopath through the eyes of a young girl who once called him her friend.

Liza Rodman and Jennifer Jordan are now telling the story in the new book, "The Babysitter."

Book cover for "Hot Seat"
Avid Reader Press / Avid Reader Press

In September 2001, Jeff Immelt replaced the most famous CEO in history, Jack Welch, at the helm of General Electric. Less than a week into his tenure, the 9/11 terrorist attacks shook the nation, and the company, to its core. GE was connected to nearly every part of the tragedy-GE-financed planes powered by GE-manufactured engines had just destroyed real estate that was insured by GE-issued policies. Facing an unprecedented situation, Immelt knew his response would set the tone for businesses everywhere that looked to GE-one of America's biggest and most-heralded corporations-for direction.

Over the next sixteen years, Immelt would lead GE through many more dire moments, from the 2008-09 Global Financial Crisis to the 2011 meltdown of Fukushima's nuclear reactors, which were designed by GE. 

In "Hot Seat," Immelt offers a rigorous, candid interrogation of himself and his tenure, detailing for the first time his proudest moments and his biggest mistakes.

Book cover for "Ticking Clock" by Ira Rosen
St. Martin's Press

Two-time Peabody Award-winning writer and producer Ira Rosen reveals the intimate, untold stories of his decades at America’s most iconic news show - 60 Minutes in his new book "Ticking Clock: Behind the Scenes at 60-Minutes."

Based on decades of access and experience, Ira Rosen takes readers behind closed doors to offer an incisive look at the show that invented TV investigative journalism.

Mark Doty is the author of more than 10 volumes of poetry and three memoirs, including "Heaven's Coast," "Firebird," and the New York Times best selling "Dog Years," as well as a book about craft and criticism, "The Art of Description: World into Word."

His latest is "What Is the Grass: Walt Whitman in My Life."

Book cover for "The Good Hand"
Penguin/Random House

  Like thousands of restless men left unmoored in the wake of the 2008 economic crash, Michael Patrick Smith arrived in the fracking boomtown of Williston, North Dakota five years later homeless, unemployed, and desperate for a job. Renting a mattress on a dirty flophouse floor, he slept boot to beard with migrant men who came from all across America and as far away as Jamaica, Africa and the Philippines. They ate together, drank together, argued like crows and searched for jobs they couldn’t get back home. Smith’s goal was to find the hardest work he could do – to find out if he could do it.

His book this time in his life is "The Good Hand: A Memoir of Work, Brotherhood, and Transformation in an American Boomtown."

Front and back covers of "Crossing the Line" by Kareem Rosser
St. Martin's Press

This morning we meet Kareem Rosser - the captain of the first all-Black squad to win the Interscholastic Polo Championship, and the face of Ralph Lauren 2020 Holiday ad campaign. 

In his new book, “Crossing the Line,” Kareem tells his story about growing up in "The Bottom" in West Philly and eventually infiltrating the most privileged of sports.

Once again, his new book is – “Crossing the Line: A Fearless Team of Brothers and the Sport That Changed Their Lives Forever.” 

Best known for directing such successes as "Addams Family Values," "Get Shorty," and the first three "Men in Black" movies, Barry Sonnenfeld's importance to modern cinema expands considerably when his cinematographer credits are added to the list: The Coen Brothers' first three films: "Blood Simple," "Raising Arizona," and "Miller's Crossing." He also was the Director of Photography on "Throw Momma from the Train," "Big," "When Harry Met Sally," and "Misery," plus, of course, his television hits: "Pushing Daisies" and "A Series of Unfortunate Events."

Bess Kalb, Emmy-nominated TV writer and New Yorker contributor, saved every voicemail her grandmother Bobby Bell ever left her. Bobby was a force--irrepressible, glamorous, unapologetically opinionated. Bobby doted on Bess; Bess adored Bobby. Then, at ninety, Bobby died. In Kalb's debut memoir, "Nobody Will Tell You This But Me," Bobby is speaking to Bess once more, in a voice as passionate as it ever was in life.

Joe Donahue: Glennon Doyle is the author of the number one New York Times bestseller “Love Warrior” an Oprah's Book Club selection as well as the New York Times bestseller “Carry On, Warrior.” An activist, speaker, and thought leader, she is also the founder and president of Together Rising, an all women-lead nonprofit organization that has revolutionized grassroots philanthropy, raising over $20 million for women, families and children in crisis.

Her latest, “Untamed” is both a memoir and a wakeup call. It offers an examination of the restrictive expectations women are issued from birth, shows how hustling to meet those expectations leaves women feeling dissatisfied and lost, overwhelmed and underwhelmed, and reveals that when we quit abandoning ourselves and instead abandon the world's expectations of us, they become women who can finally look at themselves in the mirror and recognize there she is. 

Book cover for "This is Not My Memoir?
Farrar, Straus and Giroux / Farrar, Straus and Giroux

André Gregory has been directing in New York for more than half a century. He has collaborated on film versions of his theatre productions with Wallace Shawn, Louis Malle, and Jonathan Demme. He is also an actor, writer, teacher, painter, and author of the poetry collection, "Bone Songs."

He has now written an autobiography-of-sorts. "This is Not My Memoir" tells Gregory’s life story for the first time, where he shares memories from a life lived for art, including stories from the making of the classic 1981 independent film, "My Dinner with André."

Taking on the dizzying, wondrous nature of a fever dream, "This is Not My Memoir" includes fantastic and fantastical stories that take the reader from wartime Paris to golden-age Hollywood, from avant-garde theaters to monasteries in India. Along the way we meet Jerzy Grotowski, Gregory Peck, Wallace Shawn, and many other larger-than-life personalities.

Book cover for "Three Rings"
University of Virginia Press / University of Virginia Press

Best-selling memoirist and critic Daniel Mendelsohn joins us to discuss his new book, "Three Rings," about the mysterious links between the randomness of the lives we lead and the artfulness of the stories we tell.

Combining memoir, biography, history, and literary criticism, "Three Rings" weaves together the stories of three exiled writers who turned to the classics of the past to create masterpieces of their own works that pondered the nature of narrative itself.

Daniel Mendelsohn is a frequent contributor to the New Yorker and the New York Review of Books, where he is Editor-at-Large. His books include the memoirs "An Odyssey: A Father, a Son, and an Epic" and "The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million." He teaches literature at Bard College.

Long before she was the acclaimed author of "You Just Don't Understand," a groundbreaking book about women and men, Deborah Tannen was a girl who adored her father. Though he was often absent during her childhood, she was profoundly influenced by his gift for writing and storytelling. As she grew up and he grew older, she spent countless hours recording conversations with her father for the account of his life she had promised him she’d write.

But when he hands Tannen journals he kept in his youth, and she discovers letters he saved from a woman he might have married instead of her mother, she is forced to rethink her assumptions about her father’s life and her parents’ marriage.

"Finding My Father" is a memoir of Eli Tannen’s life and the ways in which it reflects the near century that he lived.

Tony Award Winner Linda Lavin is best known portraying the title character in the TV series "Alice." She is also known for making several stage performances in many Broadway and Off-Broadway projects like "Death Defying Acts," "The Lyons," "Last of the Red Hot Lovers," "Broadway Bound," "Gypsy," and "The Diary of Anne Frank," to name a few.

In addition, Lavin has received the Golden Globe Award twice under the category Best TV Actress in a Musical or Comedy for her work in "Alice." Besides these, she is also a two-time Obie Award awardee. In 2011, Lavin was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame.

She joins us this morning to talk about another credit she has – she narrated the book: "My Own Words" by Ruth Bader Ginsburg - which we heard portions of during The Roundtable Panel this morning.

A Deal With A Devil

Sep 17, 2020

Tony Schwartz was Donald Trump’s ghostwriter for his bestselling book, "The Art of the Deal." In his new audiobook, "Dealing with the Devil: My Mother, Trump and Me," he confronts the shame that arose in the years after he helped craft a persona for Donald Trump that 30 years later aided in his election as president.

Schwartz explores how the experience of writing "The Art of the Deal" prompted him to take an entirely different path in his life. This path led Schwartz to a lifelong exploration of the factors that shape our beliefs and identity, the influence of our early caregivers, and the ways that we can heal and grow by accepting and acknowledging both the best and the worst in ourselves.

Schwartz’s story is defined not by his time with Trump, but rather by his lifelong quest to become a better human being - as a husband, a father, a grandfather and as the CEO of a company devoted to helping others more skillfully and wisely manage their lives.

In more than 50 years after her death, the legacy of author Shirley Jackson lives on with a recent film adaptation based on her book "We Have Always Lived in the Castle," Netflix series loosely inspired by "The Haunting of Hill House" and the new film. "Shirley," starring Elisabeth Moss.

New readers continue to discover this prolific author who is probably best known for her story, "The Lottery." Many of Jackson's novels, memoirs, and short stories were written in North Bennington, Vermont, where she lived with her husband, Stanley Edgar Hyman, and their four children. This morning, we meet Barry Hyman, Jackson's youngest son to talk about his mother, his childhood, and the legacy of Shirley Jackson.

Award-winning writer and public health executive Michelle Bowdler's new memoir, "Is Rape a Crime?," indicts how sexual violence has been addressed for decades in our society, asking whether rape is a crime given that it is the least reported major felony, least successfully prosecuted, and fewer than 3% of reported rapes result in conviction. Cases are closed before they are investigated and DNA evidence sits for years untested and disregarded

Rape in this country is not treated as a crime of brutal violence but often as a question of he said / she said. Bowdler says given all this, it seems fair to ask whether rape is actually a crime.

Michelle Bowdler is the Executive Director of Health & Wellness at Tufts University and, after graduating from the Harvard School of Public Health, has worked on social justice issues related to rape for over a decade. "Is Rape a Crime?" is her first book.

Joe Donahue: Kathy Valentine is a musician and songwriter known for being part of the all-female band The Go-Go's. She wrote or co-wrote many of the band's most renowned songs including "Vacation" and "Head Over Heels". In addition to playing music and writing songs, she has worked as an actor, public speaker and spokesperson and producer. She is now an author, the name of the new book is "All I Ever Wanted: A Rock 'n' Roll Memoir". 

Esther Safran Foer grew up in a home where the past was too terrible to speak of - born in Poland after World War II, her mother and father each the sole survivors of their respective families. For Esther, the Holocaust loomed in the backdrop of her daily life, but never felt discussed. The result was a childhood marked by painful silences and continued tragedy.

Even as she built a successful career married and raised three children, Esther always filter self searching. When Esther was in her early 40s, her mother casually mentioned in astonishing revelation that Esther's father had a previous wife and daughter both murdered in the Holocaust.

That would mark the beginning of the search that would define the next 20 years. She writes about it in her new book, "I Want You to Know We're Still Here" where she recounts her journey to piece together her past.

Esther Safran for was the CEO of Sixth & I, a center for arts, ideas and religion. She lives in Washington with her husband, Bert. They are the parents of Franklin, Jonathan and Joshua Safran Foer, all bestselling authors.

  Beth Robbins' first book, "A Grief Sublime," begins with the moment she is informed of her husband's sudden death in a car accident. Her navigation of grief becomes a hero's journey and ultimately leads to rediscovery.  

Her style brings readers into the direct and immediate experience of deep tragedy as well as literature. Robbins enters into conversation with Keats and Whitman, Melville and Dickinson, discovering through these writers that grief has amplified life's spectrum, welcoming her into the realm of literature where imagination meets experience in new and profound ways.  

This story is ultimately hopeful and transcendent, transforming despair into a new experience of life and a recognition of the love that remains after death.  Beth Robbins is a longtime English and drama teacher at the Berkshire Waldorf High School in Stockbridge, MA.

The new book is "A Grief Sublime." Our friend and wonderful actor Karen Allen read the audiobook.

The opioid crisis is nightly news in America, responsible for over 47,000 deaths every year – nearly two-thirds of all drug related deaths in this country. The question on everyone’s mind is: why? Why do so many people turn to drugs? When her twelve-year-old son, Atticus, asked her this question, essayist and Ravishly columnist, Erin Khar, needed to look inward before answering.

The result was "Strung Out: One Last Hit and Other Lies That Nearly Killed Me," a raw and often shocking meditation on Khar’s fifteen-year opioid addiction and her long, difficult road to recovery.

Khar will be part of the Volume Reading series at Spotty Dog Books and Ale in Hudson, New York with Douglas Stuart, Valerie Hsiung and Briallen Hopper on Saturday, March 14 at 7 p.m.

Pages