marginalized

The economy has been brutal to American workers for several decades. The promise at the heart of the American Dream is withering away. While onlookers assume those suffering in marginalized working-class communities will instinctively rise up, the 2016 election threw into sharp relief how little we know about how the working-class translate their grievances into politics.

In "We're Still Here: We're Still Here: Pain and Politics in the Heart of America," Jennifer M. Silva tells a deep, multi-generational story of pain, place, and politics that will endure long after the Trump administration. Drawing on over 100 interviews with black, white, and Latino working-class residents of a declining coal town in Pennsylvania, Silva reveals how the decline of the American Dream is lived and felt.

Jennifer M. Silva is an Assistant Professor in the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University in Bloomington.

The Arts Mid-Hudson Folk Arts Program, Latinx Project, the Reher Center for Immigrant Culture and History, the Hudson Valley LGBTQ Center, and Kingston City Hall present “The Spaces Between;” a series of exhibitions and programs facilitating exploration of the social spaces of marginalized status in American culture.

“The Spaces Between” challenges traditional views of "marginalized status" by considering the many ways people can be marginalized, including the undocumented community, the LGTBQ community, and the immigrant community through an exploration of statuses related to race, gender, and sexual identity. The project runs through September.

Elinor Levy is the Folk Arts Program Manager at Arts Mid-Hudson and she joined us to tell us more.

Juan Williams has covered and written about American politics for four decades. He is currently a columnist for The Hill, and was a longtime writer and correspondent for The Washington Post and NPR. Most notably, Juan is currently a cohost of FoxNews Channel's roundtable debate show "The Five," and makes regular appearances across the network.

He is also the author of numerous books, including "Eyes on the Prize," "Thurgood Marshall," "Enough," "Muzzled," and "We The People."

In his new book, "What the Hell Do You Have to Lose?: Trump's War on Civil Rights," Williams denounces Donald Trump for intentionally twisting history to fuel racial tensions for his political advantage. In Williams's lifetime, crusaders for civil rights have braved hatred, violence, and imprisonment, and in so doing made life immeasurably better for African Americans and other marginalized groups. Remarkably, all this progress suddenly seems to have been forgotten, or worse, undone. 

  Taylor Mac is a playwright, actor, singer-songwriter, performance artist, director and producer who is currently creating a 24-hour durational concert called, “A 24-Decade History of Popular Music.”

6 hours of the project, representing the six decades between 1836 and 1896, will be performed at MASS MoCA in North Adams Massachusetts this Saturday, April 9th from 4 to 10pm. Audience members are encouraged to come and going during the performance.

Taylor Mac was recently name-checked in a New York Magazine article about why New York Theater is thriving and The New York Times said “Fabulousness can come in many forms, and Taylor Mac seems intent on assuming each and every one of them.”