lincoln | WAMC

lincoln

On the eve of his 52nd birthday, February 11 1861, the President Elect of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, walked onto a train the first step of his journey to the White House and his rendezvous with destiny. But as the train began to carry Lincoln toward Washington, it was far from certain what he would find they're bankrupt and rudderless.

The government was on the verge of collapse. To make matters worse, reliable intelligence confirmed a conspiracy to assassinate him as he passed through Baltimore. It is no exaggeration to say that the fate of the Republic hung in the balance. How did Lincoln survive this grueling Odyssey to become the president we know from the history books?

The new book, "Lincoln On The Verge"  tells the story of a leader discovering his own strength, improvising brilliantly and seeing his country up close during these pivotal 13 days. Ted Widmer is distinguished lecturer at McCauley Honors College CUNY. In addition to his teaching, he writes actively about American history for the New York Times, The New Yorker and The Washington Post. 

Suzan-Lori Parks’ “Topdog/Underdog” won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for drama and was the number-one choice in last year’s New York Times list of “The 25 Best American Plays Since ‘Angels in America.’” The play is now being performed at Shakespeare & Company through September 8th.

In the play: two brothers, Lincoln and Booth, are locked in a battle of wits and struggle to come to terms with their identity and what history has handed them, even their names.

Director Regge Life; actors Deaon Griffin-Pressley and Bryce Michael Wood joined us.

A 3-year-old Nubian goat named Lincoln will become the first honorary “pet mayor” of Fair Haven, Vermont.

http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/ep/proclamation/

The preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, a document that put in motion the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments of the U.S. Constitution, will have a temporary home in the New York State Capital for two days.

The four-page draft of the document, handwritten by Abraham Lincoln, will be on display at the New York State Museum. The exhibition offers an unprecedented display of the only surviving version of the document in Lincoln’s handwriting and includes historical background and interpretation of the document.