lifestyle | WAMC

lifestyle

Reshma Saujani is the Founder and CEO of Girls Who Code, a national nonprofit organization working to close the gender gap in technology while teaching girls confidence and bravery through coding. A lifelong activist, Reshma was the first Indian American woman to run for U.S. Congress. She's been named a Fortune 40 under 40, a WSJ Magazine Innovator of the Year, and one of the Most Powerful Women Changing the World by Forbes.

In "Brave, Not Perfect," Reshma shares powerful insights and practices to help us let go of our need for perfection and make bravery a lifelong habit. By being brave, not perfect, we can all become the authors of our biggest, boldest, and most joyful life.

Americans care about their health. Americans pay lots of money in hopes of maintaining their health. So why are Americans so unhealthy?

The reason is simple: as a country, the United States overinvests in medical care at the expense of the social, economic, and cultural forces that produce health.

The authors are Michael Stein, Professor and Chair of Health Law, Policy and Management of the School of Public Health at Boston University and Sandro Galea, Robert A. Knox Professor and Dean of the School of Public Health at Boston University.

Michael Stein joined us.

John Leland is a reporter at The New York Times, where he wrote a yearlong series that became the basis for the book "Happiness Is a Choice You Make," and the author of two previous books, "Hip: The History" and "Why Kerouac Matters: The Lessons of “On the Road” (They’re Not What You Think)." Before joining the Times, he was a senior editor at Newsweek, editor in chief of Details, a reporter at Newsday, and a writer and editor at Spin magazine.

In 2015, when the award-winning journalist John Leland set out on behalf of The New York Times to meet members of America’s fastest-growing age group, he anticipated learning of challenges, of loneliness, and of the deterioration of body, mind, and quality of life. But the elders he met took him in an entirely different direction.

Despite disparate backgrounds and circumstances, they each lived with a surprising lightness and contentment. The reality Leland encountered upended contemporary notions of aging, revealing the late stages of life as unexpectedly rich and the elderly as incomparably wise.

Life Along The Hudson

Nov 29, 2018

Pieter Estersohn is a leading photographer of architecture and interiors. His work regularly appears in major shelter magazines, including Architectural Digest, and he has contributed to many interior design and lifestyle books.

His new book is: "Life Along the Hudson: The Historic Country Estates of the Livingston Family." It is a gorgeous over-sized coffee table book that features thirty-six sublime country homes, many overlooking the Hudson River.

This scenic stretch of estates along the Hudson offers some of the finest examples of American architecture and landscape design. The edition's thirty-five featured homes were designed in a range of styles by notable architects Stanford White, A. J. Davis, Calvert Vaux, Warren and Wetmore, and more. All pair exquisite interiors with expansive lush lawns and riverfront views. Formerly country homes for eighteenth-century landed gentry and nineteenth-century industrialists: the Astors, Chanlers, Chapmans, Delanos, Roosevelts.

Pieter Estersohn will be signing his new book on Saturday, December 8th at noon at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck.

Kate Davies MA, DPhil, has worked on environmental and social issues for her entire career.

We are living in an era of unprecedented crisis, resulting in widespread feelings of fear, despair, and grief. Now, more than ever, maintaining hope for the future is a monumental task. In Davies' new book, "Intrinsic Hope: Living Courageously in Troubled Times," she offers an antidote to these feelings and shows how conventional ideas of hope are rooted in the belief that life will conform to our wishes and how this leads to disappointment, despair, and a dismal view of the future. As an alternative, she offers 'intrinsic hope,' a powerful, liberating, and positive approach to life based on having a deep trust in whatever happens.

Families today are squeezed on every side from high childcare costs and harsh employment policies to workplaces without paid family leave or even dependable and regular working hours. Many realize that attaining the standard of living their parents managed has become impossible.

In her book, "Squeezed: Why Our Families Can't Afford America," Alissa Quart, executive editor of the Economic Hardship Reporting Project, examines the lives of many middle-class Americans who can now barely afford to raise children. She shows how our country has failed its families. Her subjects, from professors to lawyers to caregivers to nurses, have been wrung out by a system that doesn’t support them, and enriches only a tiny elite.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences joins us to talk about their new innitiative, “The Collaboratory.”

Located in Albany’s South End, this space will be used by both the College and Trinity Alliance and serve as the home base for the REACH program. The purpose of this program is to engage, empower, and activate Medicaid and Medicaid-eligible residents of the South End and nearby neighborhoods to make consistent use of preventative health care and wellness systems.

Beyond serving this need, the Collaboratory will host classes for both ACPHS students as well as for community residents. The space will also be available for community group meetings, and we expect to add more services in the years to come. Below is list of suggested questions to help guide the discussion.

We welcome ACPHS President, Dr. Greg Dewey and Dr. Colleen McLaughlin. Colleen is a professor at the College and also serves as the Chair of their Department of Population Health Sciences.

Rachel Simmons is the author of "Enough As She Is: How to Help Girls Move Beyond Impossible Standards of Success to Live Healthy, Happy and Fulfilling Lives," and the New York Times bestsellers "Odd Girl Out and "The Curse of the Good Girl."

As an educator, Rachel teaches girls and women skills to build their resilience, amplify their voices, and own their courage so that they live with integrity and health.

In recent years, the young, educated, and affluent have surged back into cities, reversing decades of suburban flight and urban decline. And yet all is not well, Richard Florida argues in The New Urban Crisis. Florida, one of the first scholars to anticipate this back-to-the-city movement in his groundbreaking The Rise of the Creative Class, demonstrates how the same forces that power the growth of the world's superstar cities also generate their vexing challenges: gentrification, unaffordability, segregation, and inequality.

Richard Florida is University Professor and Director of Cities at the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management and Distinguished Fellow at NYU's Schack Institute of Real Estate. He is Senior Editor at The Atlantic, editor-at-large for The Atlantic's CityLab, and founder of the Creative Class Group.

Mark Sundeen is the author of several books, including The Man Who Quit Money and the coauthor of North by Northwestern, which was a New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller.

His latest, The Unsettlers: In Search of the Good Life in Today's America, is a work of immersive journalism that traces the search for the simple life through the stories of these new pioneers and what inspired each of them to look for - or create - a better existence.

The production of culture was once the domain of artists, but beginning in the early 1900s, the emerging fields of public relations, advertising and marketing transformed the way the powerful communicate with the rest of us. A century later, the tools are more sophisticated than ever, the onslaught more relentless. 

In Culture as Weapon, acclaimed curator and critic Nato Thompson reveals how institutions use art and culture to ensure profits and constrain dissent--and shows us that there are alternatives.

Book Cover - Waste Free Kitchen Handbook
http://www.danagunders.com/

  Despite a growing awareness of food waste, many well-intentioned home cooks lack the tools to change their habits. Dana Gunders new book, Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook: A Guide to Eating Well and Saving Money By Wasting Less Food is packed with engaging checklists, simple recipes, practical strategies, and educational infographics.

Gunders is a scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council and the book contains techniques that call for minimal adjustments of habit, from shopping, portioning, and using a refrigerator properly to simple preservation methods including freezing, pickling, and cellaring.

In her early 20s Leanne Jacobs seemed to have it all – the perfect job with a great salary, the husband, the house; but on the inside, she felt constant pressure to work longer hours and didn’t have the mental space to take care of herself or nurture her marriage. So she took her first step on the path to creating what she would call “Beautiful Money.”

In Jacobs’ new book, Beautiful Money: The 4-Week Total Wealth Makeover, she outlines her wealth creation program, which helps us align our personal values and lifestyle with their income and career. She shows folks how to tidy up our finances and pursue their own definition of success by mindfully redesigning their lifestyle and redefining their self-worth.

Leanne Jacobs has worked in sales and marketing for several Fortune 100 companies, including Johnson & Johnson, Nike, DuPont, and L’oreal.

Even as US spending on healthcare skyrockets, impoverished Americans continue to fall ill and die of preventable conditions. Although the majority of health outcomes are shaped by non-medical factors, public and private healthcare reform efforts have largely ignored the complex local circumstances that make it difficult for struggling men, women, and children to live healthier lives.

In Dying and Living in the Neighborhood, Dr. Prabhjot Singh argues that we must look beyond the walls of the hospital and into the neighborhoods where patients live and die to address the troubling rise in chronic disease.

  Francine Jay pioneered the simple living movement with her self-published bestseller, The Joy of Less. 

Her easy-to-follow STREAMLINE method works in any space—from a single drawer to a closet, room, or entire house. What's more, it can be called upon during clutter-inducing life events such as moving, getting married, having kids, or downsizing.

  In his new book, Invisible Influence: The Hidden Forces that Shape Behavior, Jonah Berger explores the subtle, secret influences that affect the decisions we make—from what we buy, to the careers we choose, to what we eat.

Without our realizing it, other people’s behavior has a huge influence on everything we do at every moment of our lives, from the mundane to the momentous occasion. Even strangers have a startling impact on our judgments and decisions: our attitudes toward a welfare policy shift if we’re told it is supported by Democrats versus Republicans (even though the policy is the same in both cases).

  People have been getting naked in public for reasons other than sex for centuries. But as novelist and narrative journalist Mark Haskell Smith shows in Naked at Lunch, being a nudist is more complicated than simply dropping trou. “Nonsexual social nudism,” as it’s called, rose to prominence in the late nineteenth century.

  There is nothing like a Tanglewood Picnic.

The expansive lawn at the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra brings people together to enjoy some of the best music in the world at one of the most beautiful places in the world and - as if that weren’t perfect enough - when enjoying a concert from the lawn you can bring your favorite food and drink and enjoy it all in the Summer sun or under the stars.

The experience is captured in Gina Hyams new book, The Tanglewood Picnic: Music and Outdoor Feasts in the Berkshires which is published on Gina’s new imprint, Muddy Puppy Media. 

  Burned-out after years of doing development work around the world, William Powers spent a season in a 12-foot-by-12-foot cabin off the grid in North Carolina, as recounted in his award-winning memoir Twelve by Twelve.

Could he live a similarly minimalist life in the heart of New York City? To find out, Powers and his wife jettisoned 80 percent of their stuff, left their 2,000-square-foot Queens townhouse, and moved into a 350-square-foot “micro-apartment” in Greenwich Village. Downshifting to a two-day workweek, Powers explores the viability of Slow Food and Slow Money, technology fasts and urban sanctuaries in his new book, New Slow City: Living Simply In The World's Fastest City.

  Soon enough, nobody will remember life before the Internet. What does this unavoidable fact mean?

For future generations, it won’t mean anything very obvious. They will be so immersed in online life that questions about the Internet’s basic purpose or meaning will vanish.

In his book, The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We’ve Lost in a World of Constant Connection, Michael Harris places our situation in a rich historical context and helps us remember which parts of that earlier world we don’t want to lose forever. He urges us to look up—even briefly—from our screens.

  In his book, The Power of Habit, award-winning New York Times business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed.

    Author Ben Hewitt’s new book is: Saved: How I Quit Worrying About Money and Became the Richest Guy in the World. When Hewitt met Erik Gillard, he was amazed.

Here was a real-life rebel living happily in small-town Vermont on less than $10,000 per year. Gillard’s no bum. He has a job, a girlfriend, good friends, and strong ties to the community.

But how he lives his life–and why–launches Hewitt on a quest to understand the true role of money. Hewitt will be speaking at the Curiosity Forum tomorrow night at Battenkill Books in Cambridge, New York.