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Book cover for Crisis Lawyering
NYU Press

When it comes to responding to a modern-day crisis – whether it be a global pandemic, extreme weather event or an attempt to overthrow our democracy – lawyers are playing an increasingly critical role.

Eric Stern, a professor at the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity at the University at Albany and Ray Brescia, a professor of law at Albany Law School, formed a cross-disciplinary partnership to better understand this emerging and complex field.

Their new book, “Crisis Lawyering: Effective Legal Advocacy in Emergency Situations,” published through NYU Press, offers key insights, strategies and tactics to lawyers who deal with a range of crisis situations on a regular basis. Eric Stern and Ray Brescia join us.

After sexual harassment at ESPN interrupted the career of anchor and legal analyst Adrienne Lawrence, the attorney looked to write a guide to help in shutting down workplace sexual harassment so it doesn't derail your career or your life.

Her new book, "Staying in The Game," is a comprehensive sexual harassment survival guide that covers everything—from how to identify harassers and spot sexual harassment hotbeds, to how to best leverage media and lawyer up, all while staying sane and surviving cyber-scandal through the process.

Adrienne Lawrence is an attorney and television host. She was a litigator for eight years before entering broadcast journalism. A former anchor and legal analyst at ESPN, she became the first on-air personality to sue ESPN for sexual harassment.

The first special prosecutor was appointed by President Ulysses S. Grant in 1875, to investigate a bribery scandal involving his close friends and associates. Ever since, presidents of both parties have appointed special prosecutors and empowered them to operate with unusual independence.

Also called special counsels and independent counsels, such appointments became a standard method for neutralizing political scandals and demonstrating the President's commitment to the rule of law. Special counsel Robert Mueller is the latest example.

In his new book, "Prosecuting the President: How Special Prosecutors Hold Presidents Accountable and Protect the Rule of Law," Andrew Coan offers a look at the long, mostly forgotten history of special prosecutors in American politics. Andrew Coan is a law professor at the University of Arizona.

Over his career, Jerome F. Buting has spent hundreds of hours in courtrooms representing defendants in criminal trials. When he agreed to join Dean Strang as co-counsel for the defense in Steven A. Avery vs. State of Wisconsin, he knew a tough fight lay ahead. But, as he reveals in Illusion of Justice, no-one could have predicted just how tough and twisted that fight would be -- or that it would become the center of the documentary Making a Murderer, which made Steven Avery and Brendan Dassey household names and thrust Buting into the spotlight.

His book is Illusion of Justice: Inside Making a Murderer and America's Broken System.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Gideon v. Wainwright in which the Supreme Court ruled, unanimously, that defendants in criminal cases deserved legal representation in state courts. If defendants could not afford counsel, the state would have to provide it. Those lawyers are known as public defenders. 

New York's anti-corruption commission that's asking state lawmakers to reveal private law clients has the backing of the state Bar Association, which says attorney-client privilege doesn't bar the disclosure required in 20 other states.

The New York State Bar Association argues the names often are already in public court records; they're just not collected in a place for the public and ethics enforcers to see.

Two Counties Share a Service to Save Money

Dec 20, 2012

Two counties in New York’s Hudson Valley will be sharing a legal service that officials say could save the counties’ taxpayers more than 300-thousand dollars a year. Ulster County Executive Mike Hein and Dutchess County Executive Marc Molinaro say their counties are starting a one-year pilot program to share legal defense counsel. And here’s why:  when a Public Defender’s Office is disqualified from representing a client because of a legal conflict, a private attorney is assigned.  The private attorney then bills the County according to rates established by New York State.