land

Terry Tempest Williams is renowned for her singular body of literature on the environment and our experiences of home.  Her new book “Erosion: Essays of Undoing,” explores this connection, particularly to her home state of Utah, as an evolutionary process and how our undoing of the self, self-centeredness, extractive capitalism, fear, tribalism can also be our becoming, creating room for change and progress.

Mark Arax is from a Californian family of Central Valley farmers, a writer with deep ties to the land who has watched the battles over water intensify even as California lurches from drought to flood and back again.

In "The Dreamt Land," he travels the state to explore the one-of-a-kind distribution system, built in the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, that is straining to keep up with California’s relentless growth. The book is about the land and the people who have worked it; from gold miners to wheat ranchers to small fruit farmers and today’s Big Ag. Since the beginning, Californians have redirected rivers, drilled ever-deeper wells and built higher dams, pushing the water supply past its limit.

Mark Arax is an author and journalist whose writings on California and the West have received numerous awards for literary nonfiction. A former staffer at the Los Angeles Times, his work has appeared in The New York Times and the California Sunday Magazine. His books include a memoir of his father’s murder, a collection of essays about the West, and the best-selling "The King of California," which won a California Book Award, the William Saroyan Prize from Stanford University, and was named a top book of 2004 by the Los Angeles Times and the San Francisco Chronicle.

Hailed as "the great nature writer of this generation,” Robert Macfarlane is the author of books about the intersections of the human and the natural realms. In his latest, "Underland," he delivers an exploration of the Earth’s underworlds as they exist in myth, literature, memory, and the land itself.

In the sequel to his bestseller "The Old Ways," looks into our relationship with darkness, burial, and what lies beneath the surface of both place and mind. Traveling through “deep time,” the dizzying expanses of geologic time that stretch away from the present, he moves from the birth of the universe to a post-human future.

Robert Macfarlane is the author of best-selling, prize-winning books about nature, place, and people, including "Mountains of the Mind," "The Old Ways," "Landmarks," and "The Lost Words." In 2017 he was awarded the E. M. Forster Prize for Literature by the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

"Grand Canyon For Sale" by Stephen Nash is an investigation of the precarious future of America’s public lands: our national parks, forests, wildlife refuges, monuments, and wildernesses. Taking the Grand Canyon as his key example, and using on-the-ground reporting as well as scientific research, Stephen Nash shows how accelerating climate change will dislocate wildlife populations and vegetation across hundreds of thousands of square miles of the national landscape.

Pam Houston is the author of the memoir, "Deep Creek: Finding Hope In The High Country." In it, she delivers her most profound meditations yet on how "to live simultaneously inside the wonder and the grief to love the damaged world and do what she can to help it thrive."

On her 120-acre homestead high in the Colorado Rockies, Houston learned what it means to care for a piece of land and the creatures on it. Elk calves and bluebirds mark the changing seasons, winter temperatures drop to 35 below, and lightning sparks a 110,000-acre wildfire, threatening her century-old barn and all its inhabitants. Through her travels from the Gulf of Mexico to Alaska, she explores what ties her to the earth, the ranch most of all.

Alongside her devoted Irish wolfhounds and a spirited troupe of horses, donkeys, and Icelandic sheep, the ranch becomes Houston's sanctuary, a place where she discovers how the natural world has mothered and healed her after a childhood of horrific parental abuse and neglect.

Houston will be at Northshire Bookstore in Manchster Center, Vermont on February 24.

Nathaniel Philbrick, one of America’s pre-eminent historians, and the National Book Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea, Bunker Hill, and Valiant Ambition, returns to the American Revolution, a subject he’s researched and written about for twenty years.

His new book, "In The Hurricane’s Eye: The Genius of George Washington and the Victory at Yorktown," chronicles the remarkable year leading up to the siege of Yorktown, the battle that ultimately broke a years-long stalemate with the British and earned America her freedom.

"In The Hurricane’s Eye" also highlights Washington’s underappreciated naval cunning and his fraught relationship with French leaders.

Matthew Vivirito / tclf.org

The Trustees of Reservations is a member-supported nonprofit conservation organization that preserves land, nature, and historic places in Massachusetts.

Their annual “Home Sweet Home” Historic Open House Day happens May 19th. It’s their fifth year opening up their historic homes for free for a special day of tours, workshops, activities and refreshments and this year’s theme is: The Art of the Garden: Inspiration Grows Here.

To tell us more we welcome Engagement Managers for The Trustees Andrea Caluori and Margaret Moulton.

Wildflowers at Bartholomew’s Cobble
trustees.org

The Trustees of Reservations enjoy and care for more than 100 special places – nearly 25,000 acres – all around Massachusetts.

As everything starts blooming, we’re going to learn what’s happening at Trustees sites this spring. 

We are joined by Trustees General Manager for the Southern Berkshires, Brian Cruey and Engagement Site Managers Carrieanne Petrik-Huff and Andrea Caluori.

  At the dawn of the nineteenth century, as Britain, France, Spain, and the United States all jockeyed for control of the vast expanses west of the Mississippi River, the stakes for American expansion were incalculably high. Even after the American purchase of the Louisiana Territory, Spain still coveted that land and was prepared to employ any means to retain it. With war expected at any moment, Jefferson played a game of strategy, putting on the ground the only Americans he could: a cadre of explorers who finally annexed it through courageous investigation. 

Julie M. Fenster is the author of many works of popular history, including The Case of Abraham Lincoln, Race of the Century, the award-winning Ether Day, and, with Douglas Brinkley, Parish Priest, which was a New York Times bestseller. She also co-wrote the PBS documentary First Freedom, about the founders and religious liberty. Her new book is Jefferson's America: The President, the Purchase, and the Explorers Who Transformed a Nation.

In southeast England there exists a 6,000 acre tract of land that is among the most beloved (and protected) on earth - the Ashdown Forest, inspiration for the hundreds of illustrations published in the original Winnie-the-Pooh books. And yet, as certain as readers are of the look of the Hundred Acre Woods, few have known that there is a real place that provided the origin for E.H. Shepherd’s iconographic drawings.

On Thursday, November 19th, landscape designer and author, Kathryn Aalto, will be sharing her photos of Ashdown Forest along with her “map” of Pooh’s world. Aalto will be at The Spotty Dog Books & Ale in Hudson at 7:00pm. A portion of book sales will benefit the Campaign for the New Hudson Area Library

Aalto is a writer, designer, historian and lecturer who lives in Exeter, England. For the past twenty-five years, her focus has been on places where nature and culture intersect. Here newest book is The Natural World of Winnie-the-Pooh: Exploring the Real Landscapes of the Hundred Acre Wood