Juvenile Justice | WAMC

Juvenile Justice

Book cover for "My Time Will Come"
Pantheon

The inspiring story of activist and poet Ian Manuel, who at the age of fourteen was sentenced to life in prison. He survived eighteen years in solitary confinement through his own determination and dedication to art until he was freed as part of an incredible crusade by the Equal Justice Initiative.

The United States is the only country in the world that sentences thirteen- and fourteen-year-old offenders, mostly youth of color, to life in prison without parole. In 1991, Ian Manuel, then fourteen, was sentenced to life without parole for a non-homicide crime. In a botched mugging attempt with some older boys, he shot a young white mother of two in the face. But as Bryan Stevenson, attorney and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, has insisted, none of us should be judged by only the worst thing we have ever done.

The new book, "My Time Will Come" shows us the capacity of the human will to transcend adversity through determination and art—in Ian Manuel’s case, through his dedication to writing poetry.

WAMC file photo

For some time, there has been a call to overhaul New York state’s juvenile justice system. The movement to "raise the age" may be getting a boost from a higher power.

WAMC file photo

Governor Andrew Cuomo and juvenile justice reformers say New York should stop automatically prosecuting 16- and 17-year-old offenders as adults.

Supporters of the change came to the state Capitol Tuesday to make their case to lawmakers. They want to raise the age of criminal responsibility to 18, so all but the most violent 16- and 17-year-old offenders would be handled by the juvenile justice system.

Ulster County Forum To Highlight Juvenile Justice

Nov 6, 2014

A former New York State judge will be the keynote speaker Friday during an Ulster County forum on how to keeps kids in school and out of the court systems.

raisetheageny.com

Each year in New York, more than 45,000 16-and 17-year-olds are arrested and face the possibility of prosecution as adults in criminal court. If convicted, these juveniles are housed in adult jails and prisons, which advocates and some in state government want to change.

One in three American children will be arrested by the time they are twenty-three, and many will spend time locked inside horrific detention centers that defy everything we know about how to rehabilitate young offenders.

In a clear-eyed indictment of the juvenile justice system run amok, award-winning journalist Nell Bernstein shows that there is no right way to lock up a child. The very act of isolation denies delinquent children the thing that is most essential to their growth and rehabilitation: positive relationships with caring adults.

The New Press

One in three American young people will be arrested before the age of 23, and many will spend time in institutions that used to be called "reform schools" or "rehabilitation camps"...but can really only be described as prisons.

Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we'll talk to the author of an extensive study of the juvenile justice system and learn just what is happening to children behind bars.

We'll also spend an academic minute looking at the health care people get while in jail.