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journalist

Book cover for "The Perfect Police State"
PublicAffairs / PublicAffairs

Journalist Geoffrey Cain joins us this morning to tell us about his new book "The Perfect Police State: An Undercover Odyssey into China’s Terrifying Surveillance Dystopia of the Future."

The book is an investigation into how a restive region of China became the definitive police state and the global technology giants that made it possible.

Geoffrey Cain is an investigative journalist and technology writer who reported from Asia and the Middle East for twelve years. He is also the author of "Samsung Rising: The Inside Story of the South Korean Giant That Set Out to Beat Apple and Conquer Tech."

Book cover for "When Evil Lived in Laurel"
W. W. Norton & Company / W. W. Norton & Company

In January 1966, Vernon Dahmer, head of a Mississippi chapter of the NAACP and a dedicated advocate for voter registration, was murdered by the White Knights, one of the most violent sects of the KKK in the South.

Veteran journalist Curtis Wilkie’s "When Evil Lived in Laurel" is the chilling story of this little-known brutal murder from the Civil Rights era and its aftermath, which ultimately led to the downfall of the infamous Imperial Wizard Sam Bowers and the destruction of his virulently racist organization.

To recreate these harrowing events—the conversations, incendiary nighttime meetings, plans leading up to Dahmer’s murder, and the nearly botched execution of them—Wilkie drew on his exclusive access to the almost daily journals, kept secret for fifty years, of a former Klan infiltrator for the FBI who risked his life to help break the White Knights.

Author, journalist and filmmaker Sebastian Junger has long been attracted to extremes. In his new book “Freedom,” Junger uses a months-long hike he and some friends took along the railroad tracks in the mid-Atlantic a few years ago as a frame to discuss autonomy, community, violence and what freedom really means.

Book cover artwork for "The Secret History of Home Economics"
W. W. Norton & Company

The term “home economics” may conjure traumatic memories of lopsided hand-sewn pillows or sunken muffins. But common conception obscures the story of the revolutionary science of better living. The field exploded opportunities for women in the twentieth century by reducing domestic work and providing jobs as professors, engineers, chemists, and businesspeople. And it has something to teach us today.

In "The Secret History of Home Economics," Danielle Dreilinger traces the field’s history from Black colleges to Eleanor Roosevelt to Okinawa, from a Betty Crocker brigade to DIY techies. These women (and they were mostly women) became chemists and marketers, studied nutrition, health, and exercise, tested parachutes, created astronaut food, and took bold steps in childhood development and education.

Danielle Dreilinger is a former New Orleans Times-Picayune education reporter and a Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellow. She also wrote for the Boston Globe and worked at the Boston NPR station WGBH.

Book cover for "Hype" - bright sky blue background, "hype" in black serif text, sheep with a shadow in the shape of a wolf and a computer mouse cursor clicking on the sheep
Hanover Square Press

We live in an age where scams are the new normal. A charismatic entrepreneur sells thousands of tickets for a festival that never happened. Respected investors pour millions into a start-up centered around fake blood tests. Reviewers and celebrities flock to London’s top-rated restaurant that’s little more than a backyard shed. These unsettling stories of today’s viral grifters have risen to fame and hit the front-page headlines, yet the curious conundrum remains – why do these scams happen?

Drawing from scientific research, marketing campaigns, and exclusive documents and interviews, Vice reporter Gabrielle Bluestone delves into the irresistible hype that fuels our social media ecosystem, whether it’s from the trusted influencers that peddled Fyre or the consumer reviews that sold Juicero. Her new book is "Hype: How Scammers, Grifters, and Con Artists Are Taking Over the Internet and Why We're Following" that pulls back the curtain on the manipulation game behind the never-ending scam season – and how we as consumers can stop getting played.

Gabrielle Bluestone is a journalist and Emmy-nominated producer of Netflix’s “Fyre”.

Lowell Thomas
public domain / public domain

Journalist, lecturer, author, broadcaster and famous globetrotter, Lowell Thomas was the foremost raconteur of the twentieth century. His long and distinguished public career began in the wartime deserts of the Middle East and was completed in Duchess County, New York. His archives are at Marist College in Poughkeepsie.

Lowell Thomas was a man ahead of his time: the first roving newscaster, a film maker through the 1920s, a radio presenter in the 1930s, an adventurer who wrote more than 50 books, he was heralded as the father of 'Cinerama'.

Born in 1892, Lowell Thomas started out as a reporter for the Chicago Evening Journal. He had a flair for making ordinary stories exciting.

Dr. John Ansley, director of Archives and Special Collections at Marist has overseen this project and its digitation.

Trial by Fire book cover
MacMillan Publishers / MacMillan Publishers

All it took for a hundred people to die during a show by the hair metal band Great White was a sudden burst from four giant sparklers that ignited the acoustical foam lining the Station nightclub. But who was at fault? And who would pay? This being Rhode Island, the two questions wouldn't necessarily have the same answer.

"Trial By Fire" by Scott James is the story of the fire's aftermath because while the fire, one of America's deadliest, lasted minutes, the search for the truth would take years.

Bestselling author and three-time Emmy Award-winning journalist Scott James investigates all the central figures, including the band's manager and lead singer, the fire inspector, the maker of the acoustical foam, as well as the brothers.

Book cover for "On All Fronts"
Penguin/Random House / Penguin/Random House

The recipient of multiple Peabody and Murrow awards, Clarissa Ward is a world-renowned conflict reporter. In this strange age of crisis where there really is no front line, she has moved from one hot zone to the next.

With multiple assignments in Syria, Egypt, and Afghanistan, Ward, who speaks seven languages, has been based in Baghdad, Beirut, Beijing, and Moscow. She has seen and documented the violent remaking of the world at close range. With empathy, Ward finds a way to tell the hardest stories. "On All Fronts" is the account of Ward’s singular career and of journalism in this age of extremism.

Book cover for MS-13
Blink Publishing / https://www.blinkpublishing.co.uk/

MS-13 is one of the most infamous street gangs on earth, with an estimated ten thousand members operating in dozens of states and linked to thousands of grisly murders each year in the US and abroad. But it is also misunderstood.

In his book "MS-13: The Making of America's Most Notorious Gang," journalist and longtime organized crime investigator Steven Dudley brings readers inside the nefarious group to tell a larger story of how a flawed US and Central American policy, and the exploitative and unequal economic systems helped foster the gang and sustain it.

During this election season, one of the nation’s top political reporters is keeping a close eye on the Trump administration. At the same time, New York Times chief White House correspondent Peter Baker has a new book out about a titan of Washington: former secretary of state James Baker.

Chris Wallace is a veteran journalist and anchor of Fox News Sunday. His new book, "Countdown 1945: The Extraordinary Story of the 116 Days That Changed the World," a behind-the-scenes account of the secret meetings and lead up to the world's first use of the atomic bomb in wartime-the American attack on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. 

In President Trump's campaign against what he calls "Fake News," CNN Chief White House Correspondent, Jim Acosta, is public enemy number one. From the moment Mr. Trump announced his candidacy in 2015, he has attacked the media, calling journalists "the enemy of the people."

In his book, just out in paperback, "The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America," Acosta presents a damning examination of bureaucratic dysfunction, deception, and the unprecedented threat the rhetoric Mr. Trump is directing has on our democracy.  At Mr. Trump's most hated network, CNN, Acosta offers a never-before-reported account of what it's like to be the President's most hated correspondent. Acosta goes head-to-head with the White House, even after Trump supporters have threatened his life with words as well as physical violence. Acosta will be taking part in an online conversation with Berkshire Eagle Executive Editor Kevin Moran for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at Berkshire Community Collegeon Thursday, July 9th at 7pm via Zoom. The program is titled: The Enemy of the People: One Year, One Impeachment and One Pandemic Later.

Joe Donahue:  Veteran political journalist and 60 Minutes Correspondent John Dickerson's new book "The Hardest Job in the World: The American Presidency", is a deep dive into the history, evolution and current state of the American presidency, and how we can make the job less impossible and more productive.

In the book, Dickerson writes about presidents in history, such as Washington, Lincoln, FDR and Eisenhower, and in contemporary times from LBJ and Reagan and Bush, Obama and Trump, to show how a complex job has been done, and why we need to reevaluate how we view the presidency, how we choose our presidents and what we expect from them once they're in office. John Dickerson is a 60 Minutes correspondent, prior to that he was a co-host of CBS This Morning, the anchor of Face the Nation. And CBS News' Chief Washington correspondent. The new book, "The Hardest Job in the World: The American Presidency".

Joe Donahue: People prepared for the worst, but they didn't always comprehend how awful the worst could be. The campfire in November 2018, was the deadliest wildfire in America in a century, and the deadliest ever recorded in California history. It burned the town of Paradise, home to 27,000 to the ground, and it was a harbinger of fires to come. In the new book “Fire in Paradise: An American Tragedy”, reporters Alastair Gee and Dani Anguiano of The Guardian tell the story of the destruction wrought by the campfire, creating an account of how the fire happened and why fires like it will happen again. The name of the book is “Fire in Paradise“. 

Jonathan Karl is ABC News' chief Washington correspondent and chief White House correspondent.

In "Front Row at the Trump Show," Karl brings us into the White House in a powerful book unlike any other on the Trump administration. He’s known and covered Donald Trump longer than any other White House reporter. With extraordinary access to Trump during the campaign and at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Karl delivers essential new reporting and surprising insights.

Two Washington Post reporters, Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker have examined the evolution of Trump’s presidency and leadership style and in "A Very Stable Genius" they take readers behind the scenes to reveal never-before reported details of Trump’s shocking behavior and new evidence of chaos in his administration.

Carol Leonnig is a national investigative reporter at The Washington Post, where she has worked since 2000 and covers Donald Trump's presidency and other subjects. She won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for her reporting on security failures and misconduct inside the Secret Service.

On Tuesday, February 28th, 2017, the LBJ Presidential Library held An Evening With Cokie Roberts
LBJ Library

Legendary broadcast journalist Cokie Roberts died on Tuesday at the age of 75. Known to millions for her work with ABC News and NPR, Roberts was both reporter and commentator, earning respect from colleagues and subjects alike. She was also the author of many books – several focused on shining a light on the often ignored role of women in American history.

In April of 2018, Cokie Roberts was in Albany for events with The New York State Writers Institute and she came to the studio to speak with us about her career. We re-air that interview today in memoriam.

Dan Rather in a trench coat, dark red tie, holding a pen and a reporter's notebook
Ben Baker

Dan Rather, eminent newsman and the voice of a generation, will visit the University at Albany this Friday, September 6 at 7:30 p.m. in the SEFCU Arena on the University at Albany Uptown Campus.

With a storied career that has spanned more than six decades, Dan Rather is one of the world’s best-known journalists. He has interviewed every president since Eisenhower and covered almost every important dateline around the world. Rather joined CBS News in 1962, and in 1981 he assumed the position of Anchor and Managing Editor of the" CBS Evening News," which he held for twenty-four years. His reporting helped turn "60 Minutes" into an institution, launched "48 Hours" as a newsmagazine program, and shaped countless specials and documentaries.

Upon leaving CBS, Rather created the Emmy Award–winning "Dan Rather Reports" on HDNet. He is founder, president, and CEO of News and Guts, an independent production company that specializes in high-quality nonfiction content across a range of traditional and digital channels.

Rather's recent New York Times bestseller, "What Unites Us: Reflections on Patriotism," offers a collection of original essays about the world we live in, what our core ideals have been and should be, and what it means to be an American.

In the 2018 election cycle, women across the country were running in - and winning - local and national office in higher numbers than ever before.

In “See Jane Win: The Inspiring Story of the Women Changing American Politics,” award-winning journalist Caitlin Moscatello provides an insider look at this pivotal time in women’s history.

Closely following four candidates throughout the entire campaign process, Moscatello takes readers inside their exciting, winning campaigns and the sometimes thrilling, sometimes brutal realities of running for office while female.

Playing out against the backdrop of Donald Trump’s infamous Access Hollywood interview and the months leading up to the 2016 election, James Lasdun’s new novel, "Afternoon of a Faun," dramatizes one man’s search for truth after his friend is suddenly accused by an old flame – known to both of them – of sexual assault from decades ago.

John Roberts was named to the Supreme Court in 2005 claiming he would act as a neutral umpire in deciding cases. His critics argue he has been anything but, pointing to his conservative victories on voting rights and campaign finance. Yet he broke from orthodoxy in his decision to preserve Obamacare. How are we to understand the motives of the most powerful judge in the land?

In "The Chief," award-winning journalist Joan Biskupic contends that Roberts is torn between two, often divergent, priorities: to carry out a conservative agenda, and to protect the Court's image and his place in history.

Jessica Yellin is the former chief White House correspondent for CNN and an Emmy and Gracie Award- winning political journalist for CNN, ABC News, and MSNBC.

And now Jessica takes pen to paper with her new book "Savage News," a searing and at-times laugh-out-loud funny depiction of contemporary politics and the media that reports on it.

In the novel, we meet Natalie, along with her scrappy production team, who has to navigate ratings wars, workplace sexual harassment and an international political crisis in order to prove herself. But the closer she gets to achieving her dream job, the more she wonders if it is worth all the compromise.

Book Cover - Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation

Steve Luxenberg is the author of "Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation" and the critically acclaimed "Annie’s Ghosts: A Journey into a Family Secret." During his thirty years as a Washington Post senior editor, he has overseen reporting that has earned numerous national honors, including two Pulitzer Prizes.

Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court case synonymous with “separate but equal,” created remarkably little stir when the justices announced their near-unanimous decision on May 18, 1896. Yet it is one of the most compelling and dramatic stories of the nineteenth century, whose outcome embraced and protected segregation, and whose reverberations are still felt into the twenty-first. "Separate" spans a striking range of characters and landscapes, bound together by the defining issue of their time and ours: race and equality.

Tommy Tomlinson has written for publications including Esquire, ESPN the Magazine, Sports Illustrated, Forbes, Garden & Gun, and many others. He spent twenty-three years as a reporter and local columnist for the Charlotte Observer, where he was a finalist for the 2005 Pulitzer Prize in commentary. His stories have been chosen twice for the Best American Sports Writing series (2012 and 2015) and he also appears in the anthology “America’s Best Newspaper Writing.” He is also the host of the podcast SouthBound in partnership with WFAE, Charlotte’s NPR station. He has taught at Wake Forest University, the University of Georgia, and at workshops and conferences across the country. He was a 2008-09 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University.

In his new book, "The Elephant in the Room," Tomlinson chronicles his lifelong battle with weight. He also hits the road to meet other members of the plus-sized tribe in an attempt to understand how, as a nation, we got to this point. Over the course of the book, he confronts these issues head-on and chronicles the practical steps he has to take to lose weight by the end.

Longtime Capital Region journalist Michael DeMasi’s new book is "What They Said: 25 Years of Telling Stories."

The book is based on the many stories he's covered around the region. Stories like: A salvager who bought downtown Albany's biggest, ugliest building; an Irish priest lifting spirits at a maximum-security prison; a wealthy socialite whose 40 dogs eat organic chicken; a laid-off farmhand temporarily working as a human billboard; a friendly clock enthusiast named Smiley Lumpkin.

They are some of the people Michael DeMasi has interviewed during more than 25 years in journalism. He shares what they and many others said in this collection of his favorite stories. Mike is a reporter for the Albany Business Review. He has also written for the Daily Gazette and Post-Star.

During the New Deal and World War II, Washington elites turned to Hope Ridings Miller’s column in the Washington Post to see what was really going on in town. Cocktail parties, embassy receptions and formal dinners were her beat as society editor. “I went as a guest,” said Miller, “and hoped that they’d forget I was a reporter.”

In "Washington’s Golden Age," Times Union reporter, critic, and author Joseph Dalton chronicles the life of this pioneering woman journalist who covered the powerful vortex of politics, diplomacy, and society during a career that stretched from FDR to LBJ. After joining the Post staff, she was the only woman on the city desk. Later she had a nationally syndicated column. For ten years she edited Diplomat Magazine and then wrote three books about Washington life.

Kurt Eichenwald is the New York Times bestselling author. His second book, "The Informant," was made into a movie starring Matt Damon and directed by Steven Soderbergh. In addition to his distinguished work as a senior writer at Newsweek and a contributing editor at Vanity Fair, Eichenwald spent two decades as a senior writer at The New York Times, where he was a two-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He is also a two-time winner of the George Polk Award, as well as the winner of the Payne Award for Ethics in Journalism and an Emmy Award nominee.

As a college freshman, Eichenwald awoke one night on the floor of his dorm room, confused and in pain. In the aftermath of that critical moment, his once-carefree life would be consumed by confrontations with medical incompetence, discrimination that almost cost him his education and employment, physical abuse, and dark moments when he contemplated suicide.

"A Mind Unraveled: A Memoir" is the story of one man’s battle to pursue his dreams despite his often incapacitating epilepsy.

Linda Ellerbee in studio at WAMC
Patrick Garrett

Linda Ellerbee is a Peabody and Emmy Award winning journalist who was one of the first women to anchor the national news. Her work at NBC was groundbreaking, followed by her bestselling books, and her important presence for a quarter of a century explaining the news to young people on Nick News.

Alan Chartock

WAMC’s Dr. Alan Chartock shares his thoughts on Hurricane Michael and climate change. Dr. Chartock also discusses the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey over a week ago and has not been seen since.

Guided by the 3,000 letters between the prominent journalist, Lorena Hickok, and one of the world’s most admired women, Eleanor Roosevelt, Amy Bloom’s novel “White Houses” explores Eleanor’s real-life romantic relationship with Lorena.

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