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journalism

CNN's Jake Tapper

Jun 8, 2021
Jake Tapper
Jeremy Freeman / jaketapper.com

Later today, CNN anchor Jake Tapper will be our guest on “The Book Show,” to discuss his new thriller, "The Devil May Dance." In that interview, we focus on the book which deals with a mystery in Hollywood during the height of the Rat Pack.

This morning we talk with Jake Tapper about a Washington Post Article last month headlined: The new CNN is more opinionated and emotional. Can it still be ‘the most trusted name in news’?

In the article – journalist Jeremy Barr – writes: As the first presidential debate of the 2020 general election came to a close last fall, CNN’s top anchors and political correspondents stepped up to offer their seasoned perspective and analysis.

“That,” said anchor Jake Tapper, “was a hot mess, inside a dumpster fire, inside a train wreck.” But political correspondent Dana Bash insisted on cutting to the chase. “You used some high-minded language,” she parried. “I’m just going to say it like it is: That was a s--- show.” While that article was much discussed - I asked Jake Tapper what he made of it.

Book cover artwork for "The Secret History of Home Economics"
W. W. Norton & Company

The term “home economics” may conjure traumatic memories of lopsided hand-sewn pillows or sunken muffins. But common conception obscures the story of the revolutionary science of better living. The field exploded opportunities for women in the twentieth century by reducing domestic work and providing jobs as professors, engineers, chemists, and businesspeople. And it has something to teach us today.

In "The Secret History of Home Economics," Danielle Dreilinger traces the field’s history from Black colleges to Eleanor Roosevelt to Okinawa, from a Betty Crocker brigade to DIY techies. These women (and they were mostly women) became chemists and marketers, studied nutrition, health, and exercise, tested parachutes, created astronaut food, and took bold steps in childhood development and education.

Danielle Dreilinger is a former New Orleans Times-Picayune education reporter and a Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellow. She also wrote for the Boston Globe and worked at the Boston NPR station WGBH.

Book cover for "Sidelined"
Dutton

The #MeToo movement has touched every facet of the entertainment industry. But, what about the professional sports world?

In her new book, “Sidelined: Sports, Culture, and Being a Woman in America,” award-winning journalist, former sports radio host, and Deadspin editor Julie DiCaro tackles the myriad ways sexism pervades sports at all levels.

From condescending coverage of women’s pro sports, to high barriers that women face breaking into and excelling in sports media, to male athletes and managers who abuse their partners yet face minimal consequences, DiCaro examines the destructive impact that misogyny has on athletes, sports reporters, and fans alike.

Book cover for "Ticking Clock" by Ira Rosen
St. Martin's Press

Two-time Peabody Award-winning writer and producer Ira Rosen reveals the intimate, untold stories of his decades at America’s most iconic news show - 60 Minutes in his new book "Ticking Clock: Behind the Scenes at 60-Minutes."

Based on decades of access and experience, Ira Rosen takes readers behind closed doors to offer an incisive look at the show that invented TV investigative journalism.

Book cover for "On All Fronts"
Penguin/Random House / Penguin/Random House

The recipient of multiple Peabody and Murrow awards, Clarissa Ward is a world-renowned conflict reporter. In this strange age of crisis where there really is no front line, she has moved from one hot zone to the next.

With multiple assignments in Syria, Egypt, and Afghanistan, Ward, who speaks seven languages, has been based in Baghdad, Beirut, Beijing, and Moscow. She has seen and documented the violent remaking of the world at close range. With empathy, Ward finds a way to tell the hardest stories. "On All Fronts" is the account of Ward’s singular career and of journalism in this age of extremism.

In President Trump's campaign against what he calls "Fake News," CNN Chief White House Correspondent, Jim Acosta, is public enemy number one. From the moment Mr. Trump announced his candidacy in 2015, he has attacked the media, calling journalists "the enemy of the people."

In his book, just out in paperback, "The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America," Acosta presents a damning examination of bureaucratic dysfunction, deception, and the unprecedented threat the rhetoric Mr. Trump is directing has on our democracy.  At Mr. Trump's most hated network, CNN, Acosta offers a never-before-reported account of what it's like to be the President's most hated correspondent. Acosta goes head-to-head with the White House, even after Trump supporters have threatened his life with words as well as physical violence. Acosta will be taking part in an online conversation with Berkshire Eagle Executive Editor Kevin Moran for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at Berkshire Community Collegeon Thursday, July 9th at 7pm via Zoom. The program is titled: The Enemy of the People: One Year, One Impeachment and One Pandemic Later.

Donald Trump and His Assault On Truth cover
Donald Trump and His Assault On Truth

If you follow American politics closely — and lately, who doesn’t? — you’ve probably heard the statistic that President Trump has told nearly 20,000 lies since taking office. That we know the precise number of false claims is thanks to The Washington Post’s Fact Checker team, which has documented every statement, tweet, speech and interview so far.

Jonathan Karl is ABC News' chief Washington correspondent and chief White House correspondent.

In "Front Row at the Trump Show," Karl brings us into the White House in a powerful book unlike any other on the Trump administration. He’s known and covered Donald Trump longer than any other White House reporter. With extraordinary access to Trump during the campaign and at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, Karl delivers essential new reporting and surprising insights.

Two Washington Post reporters, Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker have examined the evolution of Trump’s presidency and leadership style and in "A Very Stable Genius" they take readers behind the scenes to reveal never-before reported details of Trump’s shocking behavior and new evidence of chaos in his administration.

Carol Leonnig is a national investigative reporter at The Washington Post, where she has worked since 2000 and covers Donald Trump's presidency and other subjects. She won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for her reporting on security failures and misconduct inside the Secret Service.

In Peter Steiner's novel "The Good Cop" it's 1920 in Munich. Detective Willi Geismeier has a problem: how do you uphold the law when the law goes bad? The First World War has been lost and Germany is in turmoil. The new government in Berlin is weak. The police and courts are corrupt. Fascists and Communists are fighting in the streets. People want a savior, someone who can make Germany great again. To many, Adolf Hitler seems perfect for the job.

When the offices of a Munich newspaper are bombed, Willi Geismeier investigates, but as it gets political, he is taken off the case. Willi continues to ask questions, but when his pursuit of the truth itself becomes a crime, his career and his life are in grave danger.

Peter Steiner is the author of the critically acclaimed Louis Morgon series of crime novels. He is also a cartoonist for The New Yorker Magazine.

Dan Rather in a trench coat, dark red tie, holding a pen and a reporter's notebook
Ben Baker

Dan Rather, eminent newsman and the voice of a generation, will visit the University at Albany this Friday, September 6 at 7:30 p.m. in the SEFCU Arena on the University at Albany Uptown Campus.

With a storied career that has spanned more than six decades, Dan Rather is one of the world’s best-known journalists. He has interviewed every president since Eisenhower and covered almost every important dateline around the world. Rather joined CBS News in 1962, and in 1981 he assumed the position of Anchor and Managing Editor of the" CBS Evening News," which he held for twenty-four years. His reporting helped turn "60 Minutes" into an institution, launched "48 Hours" as a newsmagazine program, and shaped countless specials and documentaries.

Upon leaving CBS, Rather created the Emmy Award–winning "Dan Rather Reports" on HDNet. He is founder, president, and CEO of News and Guts, an independent production company that specializes in high-quality nonfiction content across a range of traditional and digital channels.

Rather's recent New York Times bestseller, "What Unites Us: Reflections on Patriotism," offers a collection of original essays about the world we live in, what our core ideals have been and should be, and what it means to be an American.

Anna Quindlen became a go-to writer on the joys and challenges of family, motherhood, and modern life, in her nationally syndicated column.

In her new book, "Nanaville: Adventures in Grandparenting," she offers observations about her new role, no longer mother and decision-maker, but secondary character and support to the parents of her grandchildren.

Playing out against the backdrop of Donald Trump’s infamous Access Hollywood interview and the months leading up to the 2016 election, James Lasdun’s new novel, "Afternoon of a Faun," dramatizes one man’s search for truth after his friend is suddenly accused by an old flame – known to both of them – of sexual assault from decades ago.

John Roberts was named to the Supreme Court in 2005 claiming he would act as a neutral umpire in deciding cases. His critics argue he has been anything but, pointing to his conservative victories on voting rights and campaign finance. Yet he broke from orthodoxy in his decision to preserve Obamacare. How are we to understand the motives of the most powerful judge in the land?

In "The Chief," award-winning journalist Joan Biskupic contends that Roberts is torn between two, often divergent, priorities: to carry out a conservative agenda, and to protect the Court's image and his place in history.

Jessica Yellin is the former chief White House correspondent for CNN and an Emmy and Gracie Award- winning political journalist for CNN, ABC News, and MSNBC.

And now Jessica takes pen to paper with her new book "Savage News," a searing and at-times laugh-out-loud funny depiction of contemporary politics and the media that reports on it.

In the novel, we meet Natalie, along with her scrappy production team, who has to navigate ratings wars, workplace sexual harassment and an international political crisis in order to prove herself. But the closer she gets to achieving her dream job, the more she wonders if it is worth all the compromise.

David McCraw
New York Times

David McGraw serves as deputy general counsel at the New York Times, a job he also held at the Daily News before coming to the paper of record in 2002. In addition to teaching at NYU School of Law and Harvard Law School, McGraw is the author of a new book that is getting a lot of attention in these news war days: Truth In Our Times: Inside the Fight for Press Freedom in the Age of Alternative Facts. McGraw is  a graduate of Albany Law School. He’ll return to campus for a discussion and book signing on Wednesday at 3 p.m.

Former Times Union editor Harry Rosenfeld has a new memoir coming out entitled "Battling Editor: The Albany Years." In 1978, Harry Rosenfeld left the Washington Post, where he oversaw the paper's standard-setting coverage of Watergate, to take charge of two daily papers under co-ownership in Albany, New York: the morning Times Union and the evening Knickerbocker News.

During the New Deal and World War II, Washington elites turned to Hope Ridings Miller’s column in the Washington Post to see what was really going on in town. Cocktail parties, embassy receptions and formal dinners were her beat as society editor. “I went as a guest,” said Miller, “and hoped that they’d forget I was a reporter.”

In "Washington’s Golden Age," Times Union reporter, critic, and author Joseph Dalton chronicles the life of this pioneering woman journalist who covered the powerful vortex of politics, diplomacy, and society during a career that stretched from FDR to LBJ. After joining the Post staff, she was the only woman on the city desk. Later she had a nationally syndicated column. For ten years she edited Diplomat Magazine and then wrote three books about Washington life.

Kurt Eichenwald is the New York Times bestselling author. His second book, "The Informant," was made into a movie starring Matt Damon and directed by Steven Soderbergh. In addition to his distinguished work as a senior writer at Newsweek and a contributing editor at Vanity Fair, Eichenwald spent two decades as a senior writer at The New York Times, where he was a two-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He is also a two-time winner of the George Polk Award, as well as the winner of the Payne Award for Ethics in Journalism and an Emmy Award nominee.

As a college freshman, Eichenwald awoke one night on the floor of his dorm room, confused and in pain. In the aftermath of that critical moment, his once-carefree life would be consumed by confrontations with medical incompetence, discrimination that almost cost him his education and employment, physical abuse, and dark moments when he contemplated suicide.

"A Mind Unraveled: A Memoir" is the story of one man’s battle to pursue his dreams despite his often incapacitating epilepsy.

Linda Ellerbee in studio at WAMC
Patrick Garrett

Linda Ellerbee is a Peabody and Emmy Award winning journalist who was one of the first women to anchor the national news. Her work at NBC was groundbreaking, followed by her bestselling books, and her important presence for a quarter of a century explaining the news to young people on Nick News.

Seymour Hersh's fearless reporting has earned him fame, front-page bylines in virtually every major newspaper in the free world, honors galore, and no small amount of controversy.

Now in this memoir, "Reporter," he describes what drove him and how he worked as an independent outsider, even at the nation's most prestigious publications.

CNN anchor and correspondent Jake Tapper is known for his hard-nosed interviews that seek to get at the truth of our contentious times. But now in his new novel, Tapper turns his attention to another fractious period in U.S. history.

In "The Hellfire Club," a political thriller set in 1950s Washington, Tapper writes about a time when the Red Scare and McCarthyism ruled the city.

As for the day job - Tapper hosts “The Lead” and “State of the Union” on CNN and brings attention to some of the biggest political headlines. Tapper talks to us about the inspiration for his foray into fiction, his life as a journalist, and which recent news stories have captured his full attention.

On Tuesday, February 28th, 2017, the LBJ Presidential Library held An Evening With Cokie Roberts
LBJ Library

Cokie Roberts, one of America’s leading broadcast journalists, is a long-time reporter, news analyst, and commentator for National Public Radio; a commentator and analyst for ABC News; and a regular roundtable analyst for "This Week with George Stephanopoulos."

She was in Albany, New York this week for two events with the New York State Writers Institute. She joined us to talk about her career, journalism and current events.

Gilbert King is the author of "Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America," which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2013. He has written about Supreme Court history and the death penalty for the New York Times and the Washington Post, and is a featured contributor to Smithsonian magazine and The Marshall Project.

His new book, "Beneath a Ruthless Sun" tells a powerful, page-turning story rooted in the fears that rippled through the South as integration began to take hold, sparking a surge of virulent racism that savaged the vulnerable, debased the powerful, and roils our own times still.

The story begins in 2007 when Deborah Campbell travels undercover to Damascus to report on the exodus of Iraqis into Syria following the overthrow of Saddam Hussein. There she meets and hires Ahlam, a refugee working as a “fixer”—providing Western media with trustworthy information and contacts to help get the news out. Ahlam, who fled her home in Iraq after being kidnapped while running a humanitarian centre, not only supports her husband and two children through her work with foreign journalists but is setting up a makeshift school for displaced girls. She has become a charismatic, unofficial leader of the refugee community in Damascus, and Campbell is inspired by her determination to create something good amid so much suffering. Ahlam soon becomes her friend as well as her guide. But one morning Ahlam is seized from her home in front of Campbell’s eyes. Haunted by the prospect that their work together has led to her friend’s arrest, Campbell spends the months that follow desperately trying to find her—all the while fearing she could be next.

Deborah Campbell is an award-winning writer known for combining culturally immersive fieldwork with literary journalism in places such as Iran, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt, Qatar, the UAE, Israel, Palestine, Cuba, Mexico and Russia. Her work has appeared in Harper’s, the EconomistForeign Policy, the GuardianNew ScientistMs., and other publications.

Her new book is A Disappearance in Damascus: A Story of Friendship and Survival in the Shadow of War.

Jake Bernstein was a senior reporter on the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists team that broke the Panama Papers story. In 2017, the project won the Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting. Bernstein earned his first Pulitzer Prize in 2011 for National Reporting, for coverage of the financial crisis.

In "Secrecy World," Bernstein explores this shadow economy and how it evolved, drawing on millions of leaked documents from the files of the Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca ― a trove now known as the Panama Papers ― as well as other journalistic and government investigations. Bernstein shows how shell companies operate, how they allow the super-wealthy and celebrities to escape taxes, and how they provide cover for illicit activities on a massive scale by crime bosses and corrupt politicians across the globe.

Judy Patrick
Daily Gazette

After a 35-year tenure at The Daily Gazette, editor and senior vice president Judy Patrick plans to leave the newspaper as soon as March. Patrick, often heard as a guest on WAMC, made the announcement Friday afternoon. She has been managing editor since 2008. She spoke with WAMC's Ian Pickus just after the announcement came out.

The culmination of nearly 30 years of reporting on Donald Trump, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter, David Cay Johnston, takes a revealingly close look at the mogul's rise to power and prominence in his new book, "The Making of Donald Trump."

Covering the long arc of Trump’s career, Johnston tells the story of how a boy from a quiet section of Queens, NY would become an entirely new, and complex, breed of public figure. Trump is a man of great media savvy, entrepreneurial spirit, and political clout. Yet his career has been plagued by legal troubles and mounting controversy.

In his new book, Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History, NYT bestselling author and co-creator of the Peabody-Award winning public radio show Studio 360, Kurt Andersen, provides a new and comprehensive understanding of our post-truth world and the American instinct in make- believe.

This interview was recorded at UAlbany as part of the New York State Writers Institute symposium: Telling the Truth in a Post-Truth World.

Bob Schieffer and Brian Shields Friday at WAMC's studios.
Joe Donahue

CBS News veteran broadcaster Bob Schieffer, author of a new book on the state of the news media called Overload, is in Albany on Friday for a symposium at the Writers Institute, Telling The Truth In A Post-Truth World. First, he visited WAMC's studios and spoke with WAMC's Brian Shields on Midday Magazine.

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