Jim condos | WAMC

Jim condos

Absentee ballots are checked by elections officials
Pat Bradley/WAMC

The Vermont Senate on Tuesday gave final approval and sent to the governor’s desk a proposal that allows voting by mail in all general elections in the state.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

Vermont’s Secretary of State has released the results of the election audit held earlier this week, finding no irregularities.

The feet of two people are visible standing behind voting booths in a hallway
Josh Landes / WAMC

The U.S. House is set to begin debating H.R. 1 this week. The For the People Act is intended to expand voting rights. On Monday, Vermont at-large Congressman Peter Welch held a virtual roundtable with the Green Mountain state’s election officials and civic advocates to discuss the implications of the bill.

Vermont’s Secretary of State says he’s glad U.S. Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh corrected an opinion that mischaracterized Vermont’s voting system but the correction still misrepresents the state’s election system.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos says early voting in the state is off to a record start.

wikipedia commons

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos outlined the voting process Monday and told members of the Vermont Chamber that voters are setting turnout records during early voting.

Vermont’s top election official is urging voters to return their ballots to town clerks soon.

Vote Buttons
WikiMedia Commons

Vermonters are going to the polls today to vote in statewide primary contests.  This year the number of people physically at polling places may be lower because a record number of mail-in and absentee ballots were requested.

Vote Buttons
WikiMedia Commons

In-person voting for Vermont’s statewide primary is Tuesday. The state’s top election official says there have been a record-breaking number of requests for mail in and absentee ballots.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos has issued the formal rules for voting in the 2020 November general election. WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley reports the directive includes safety measures made in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

Vermont’s top election official says preparations for the state’s August primary include a new vote-by-mail option.

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission is an independent commission that was created by the 2002 Help America Vote Act. It helps elections officials administer and promote citizen participation in the voting process. The group held its annual summit this week in Washington to discuss preparations for the fall elections. Vermont’s Secretary of State delivered the welcoming comments to the group.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos, who is also the immediate past president of the National Association of Secretaries of State, is calling on Congress to protect election security in a strongly-worded statement.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos is also the President of the National Association of Secretaries of State.  In both roles, cybersecurity is his top priority, and he has testified before Congress on the importance of assuring election security.  The Democrat was in Boston last week as the keynote speaker at a conference titled “Building a New Cyber Security Paradigm.” Secretary Condos tells WAMC’s North Country Bureau Chief Pat Bradley that Vermont began securing all its computer systems in 2013 and the state is considered a leader in cybersecurity.

All five of Vermont’s statewide office holders were re-elected on Tuesday. It was a good night for Democrats, but Republicans kept the state’s top office.

One week before voters go to the polls, Vermont’s Secretary of State discussed the state’s election system and security, including a new system designed to increase accessibility.

The U.S. Election Assistance Commission has released grants for 49 of the 55 states and territories eligible to receive HAVA – Help America Vote Act – funds from the 2018 federal budget.  Officials from the commission were joined by Vermont’s Secretary of State during a regional conference call today to provide an overview of how states plan to use the newly appropriated funds.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos is the president-elect of the National Association of Secretaries of State.  A key priority he plans to focus on is election security. In March, he testified before the U.S. Select Committee on Intelligence on the topic and this week the Democrat returned to testify before the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

On Tuesday, the Vermont House failed to override Governor Phil Scott’s second budget veto. The legislature is now attempting to craft a third budget before the end of the month.  The day before the override vote, Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos sent a memo to legislative leaders and the Republican governor outlining the potential impacts of a government shutdown if a state budget is not in place by July 1st.  Condos, a Democrat, says he sent the memo because there has been no discussion or plan put forth as to what would happen in the event of a shutdown.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos was in Washington this month to testify before the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence regarding election security.  He appeared not only as Vermont’s chief election officer, but as president-elect of the National Association of Secretaries of State.  He says anything that has a computer in it can be hacked.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

Vermont’s Secretary of State appeared before a U.S. Senate committee Wednesday to discuss election cyber security.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos says he will not submit voter data after receiving a second request from the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
photo provided

On June 28th, the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity sent a letter to all state Secretaries of State requesting voter information.  The commission is charged through a presidential executive order to study alleged voter fraud in the 2016 election.  But many states are balking.  Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos initially said he would provide only publicly available information.  This week, he changed his mind and determined he would not send any voter information to the commission.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
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Vermont’s Secretary of State is clarifying that he will not release private and sensitive voter information to President Trump’s Election Integrity Commission.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos
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Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos was elected Treasurer of the National Association of Secretaries of State during its 2016 conference last weekend.

Vt Secretary Of State Starting 'Transparency Tour'

Nov 4, 2013
en.wikipedia.org

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos is launching what he's calling his second "Got Transparency" tour to talk about changes in the state's open meeting and public records law.

The first of the meetings will be held today in Hartford. In all, there will be meeting in 10 towns.

The meetings are to discuss Vermont's public records and open meeting laws with municipal and state employees, citizens serving on local government boards and the general public.

Vermont Secretary of State's office

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos has been elected to an office with the National Association of Secretaries of State.

Vermont Secretary of State Jim Condos says he wants to require that city and town clerks report election results to his office on election night.

At the same time, Condos says he wants to streamline other steps in the reporting process to make it easier for clerks.

Condos said Tuesday marked the second part of a three-part test this year: He asked clerks to report results to his office in the March presidential primary, the state primary and on the night of the general election coming up in November.