human nature

All too quickly, talkative, affectionate young boys seem to slip away. Adolescents may be transformed overnight into reclusive, seemingly impenetrable young people who open up only to their friends and spend more time on devices than with family. How do you penetrate this shell before they are lost to you?

Drawing on decades of experience garnered through thousands of hours of therapy with boys, clinical psychologist Adam Cox’s new book, "Cracking the Boy Code," explains how the key to communicating with boys is understanding their universal psychological needs and using specific, straightforward communication techniques.

Why do we do the things we do? Robert Sapolsky, celebrated Stanford primatologist and neurobiologist and recipient of a MacArthur Foundation genius grant, tackles this age-old question in his investigation into the science of human behavior, "Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst," now available in paperback.

From violence and aggression to cooperation and empathy, Sapolsky explores what we can do to better understand our relationships to one another. He argues that we should not distinguish between aspects of a behavior that are biological and those that are cultural because they are utterly intertwined.

Lonni Sue Johnson was a renowned artist who regularly produced covers for The New Yorker, a gifted musician, a skilled amateur pilot, and a joyful presence to all who knew her. But in late 2007, she contracted encephalitis. The disease burned through her hippocampus like wildfire, leaving her severely amnesic, living in a present that rarely progresses beyond ten to fifteen minutes.

     Remarkably, she still retains much of the intellect and artistic skills from her previous life, but it's not at all clear how closely her consciousness resembles yours or mine. In The Perpetual Now: A Story of Amnesia, Memory, and Love, award-winning science journalist Michael D. Lemonick uses the unique drama of Lonni Sue Johnson's day-to-day life to give us a nuanced and intimate understanding of the science that lies at the very heart of human nature.

  In Raising Human Beings, internationally renowned child psychologist and New York Times bestselling author of Lost at School and The Explosive Child Ross W. Greene Ph.D. explains how to cultivate a better parent-child relationship while also nurturing empathy, honesty, resilience, and independence.

In The Well-Tempered City, Jonathan F. P. Rose distills a lifetime of interdisciplinary research and firsthand experience into a five-pronged model for how to design and reshape our cities with the goal of equalizing their landscape of opportunity.

Rose works with cities and not-for-profits to plan and build green affordable and mixed-income housing and cultural, health, and educational centers. Recognized for creating communities that literally heal both residents and neighborhoods, Rose is one of the nation's leading thinkers on the integration of environmental, social, and economic solutions to the urban issues facing us today.

The University of California Berkley Philosophy professor, Alva Noë, is one for the foremost philosophers on consciousness and perception. In his book, Out Of Our Heads, Noë challeges the paradigm that consciousness that solely occurs within the confines of our brains. Now in his new book, Strange Tools: Art And Human Nature, he turns his focus on essential questions about art. 

   There are two supreme predators on the planet with the most complex brains in nature: humans and orcas. In the twentieth century alone, one of these animals killed 200 million members of its own species, the other has killed none. Jeffrey Masson's new book, Beasts, begins here: There is something different about us.

Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson is an ex-psychoanalyst and former director of the Freud Archives, and is the author of numerous bestselling books on animal emotions, including Dogs Never Lie About Love and When Elephants Weep.