Hoosick Falls Water contamination

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Environmentalists are urging a New York state panel on water quality standards to meet its October 2nd deadline to set new acceptable levels of toxic chemicals in public water supplies.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is asking the Village of Hoosick Falls to pump the brakes on a revised settlement agreement with two companies deemed responsible for polluting local water supplies with the chemical PFOA.

The Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics facility on McCaffrey Street in Hoosick Falls
Lucas Willard / WAMC

Later this week, officials in the Rensselaer County community of Hoosick Falls will consider a settlement offer by two companies deemed responsible for contaminating water sources with the chemical PFOA.

a water drinking fountain
WAMC

With a new legislative session in New York, environmental groups are calling on state officials to make clean water a priority in 2017.

Hansi Lo Wang | NPR

The owners of a property on the market in upstate New York have sued two companies blamed for contaminating the village of Hoosick Falls' water supply.

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has entered an agreement to hold company Taconic responsible for removing the chemical PFOA from water supplies in the Rensselaer County community of Petersburgh. 

Lucas Willard / WAMC

The toxic and persistent chemical PFOA has been discovered in water supplies in Petersburgh, New York, Bennington, Vermont, and other communities over the past year. As residents with contaminated drinking water in Hoosick Falls are still waiting for a permanent fix, The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is considering the Rensselaer County village for Superfund status.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Three mothers from Flint, Michigan, a city dealing with toxic, lead-contaminated tap water, shared a gymnasium with local residents at St. Mary’s Academy in Hoosick Falls, where water has been tainted with the carcinogen PFOA.

Wikipedia

  Governor Cuomo’s health commissioner faced an intense grilling from lawmakers at a joint hearing on how the administration handled water contamination in in the eastern New York village of Hoosick Falls.

Wikipedia

Federal regulators say they have recommended designating part of an upstate New York village as a Superfund site for cleanup.

Republican State Senator Kathy Marchione presided over the marathon 10-hour session at Hoosick Falls Central School.
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

A long-awaited New York state Senate hearing on the fallout from PFOA-contaminated water was held Tuesday in Hoosick Falls. Officials and angry residents took to the microphone.

On Wednesday, Weitz & Luxenberg filed its suit on behalf of plaintiff James Donavan. The complaint alleges that exposure to the chemical PFOA, which was discovered in the village drinking water supply and private wells, has caused Donavan’s ulcerative colitis and other illnesses.

Governor Andrew  Cuomo Thursday signed the bill, which would allow those with health effects associated with a federal or state superfund site to file a personal injury suit by suspending the statute of limitations for three years after such a designation.

a water drinking fountain
WAMC

This week the New York State Assembly Committees on Health and Environmental Conservation announced hearings into examine the quality of the state’s drinking water and state government’s responses to contamination issues.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Republican State Senator Kathy Marchione’s office has released the results of a two-hour meeting between New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Director of State Operations, the Departments of Health and Environmental Conservation, and leaders from Hoosick Falls and Petersburgh — where the water is contaminated. 

Lucas Willard / WAMC

The communities of Bennington and North Bennington were changed when PFOA was detected in private wells in February.

State and local officials as well as contracted engineers will hold a public meeting at Bennington College at 5:30 for residents affected by the PFOA contamination found in local water supplies.

New York environmental regulators are looking statewide for potential sites of groundwater contamination from a cancer-causing chemical previously used to make Teflon and other products.

A bill designed to provide legal options to victims of water contamination in their communities has cleared both houses of the New York state legislature.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Months after the state of New York began responding to high levels of a toxic chemical in water supplies in Hoosick Falls, several steps have been taken, including the installation of filtration systems on the village water supply and private wells. But the people of Hoosick Falls are still worried.

Two new locations in Vermont have been found to have PFOA and PFOS contamination.

New York State's Health Department says the average level of the toxic chemical PFOA in the blood of 2,000 Hoosick Falls residents was about 10 times that of the general population.

The Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics facility on McCaffrey Street in Hoosick Falls
Lucas Willard / WAMC

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has secured an agreement that holds companies Saint-Gobain and Honeywell responsible for the PFOA contamination in Hoosick Falls and surrounding area.

The industrial chemicals PFOA and PFOS have caused trouble for residents of communities like Hoosick Falls, Newburgh, Petersburgh, and Bennington. Federal officials have advised residents to stop drinking the contaminated water and state governments are still putting measures in place to deliver clean water to residents.

The Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics facility on McCaffrey Street in Hoosick Falls
Lucas Willard / WAMC

With residents in the Town of Hoosick and Petersburgh still dealing with compromised drinking water due to the presence of PFOA, Representative Chris Gibson has sent a letter to House Committee on Oversight and Government Chairman Jason Chaffetz asking the committee to investigate the response of state and federal authorities.

Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin’s office has announced results from surface water testing in Bennington and North Bennington, as state authorities are hoping to determine the source and extent of a chemical contamination.

Office of Governor Andrew Cuomo

The state health department said Wednesday repeated testing of the village of Hoosick Falls water system shows non-detection of perfluorooctanoic acid, and the water is now safe for all uses including cooking and drinking.

Vermont Congressman Peter Welch will visit with state and local officials in Southern Vermont Monday to receive an update on the chemical contamination of private wells.

Office of Governor Andrew Cuomo

The New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Conservation say tests are showing decontamination of the Hoosick Falls water system is successful.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

Bennington College has received a $90,000 grant to study the chemical PFOA, which has been found in surrounding water sources. WAMC's Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard spoke with faculty at the college who will be guiding research into a subject with many unknowns.

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