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Joe Donahe: Journalist Lauren Sandler's new book "This Is All I Got: A New Mother's Search for Home" is an immersion in the life of a young homeless single mother amid her quest to find stability and shelter in the richest city in America. Camila is 22 years old and a new mother, she has no family to rely on, no partner, and no home. Sandler chronicles a year in Camila's life from birth of her son to his first birthday, as she navigates the labyrinth of poverty and homelessness in New York City.

Lauren Sandler as an award winning journalist. She is the author of three books, including the brand-new "This Is All I Got: A New Mother's Search for Home." 

There will be opportunities in the Capital Region to hear a dialogue between an Orthodox Israeli settler and a Palestinian activist as they tell their personal stories and of their efforts to build a better future.

Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger and Shadi Abu Awwad of Roots come with no ready peace plans in hand, but only with the conviction that human understanding and trust will be the prerequisites for lasting justice, freedom and peace on that tiny sliver of land that they both call home.

Rabbi Hanan and Shadi Abu Awwad will speak in several locations in the Capital Region tonight through Wednesday.

Farming has been in John Connell's family for generations, but he never intended to follow in his father's footsteps. Until, one winter, after more than a decade away, he finds himself back on the farm.

Connell records the hypnotic rhythm of the farming day—cleaning the barns, caring for the herd, tending to sickly lambs, helping the cows give birth. Alongside the routine events, there are the unforeseen moments when things go wrong: when a calf fails to thrive, when a sheep goes missing, when illness breaks out, when an argument between father and son erupts and things are said that cannot be unsaid.

"The Farmer’s Son" is the story of a calving season, and the story of a man who emerges from depression to find hope in the place he least expected to find it.

This morning we will learn how to unfetter and unclutter your life by learning how and why to transition to a tiny home – if you want to.

Do you feel as though you’re living in an expensive and ill-fitting home filled with too much stuff? Do you have too much space filled with too many things, constantly dealing with house maintenance and financial upkeep? Living in a tiny home could be the solution. But how do you know?

Tiny house guru Patricia Foreman examines the hows and whys of tiny-home living, to help you assess whether it’s the right solution for you. Her book is "A Tiny Home to Call Your Own."

Shakespeare & Company is currently presenting Obie Award-winning playwright Taylor Mac's dark comedy “HIR,” directed by Alice Reagan through October 7.

The play begins with Isaac, who has returned from the war in Afghanistan, only to discover a household in revolt.

The insurgent: his mom.

Liberated from an oppressive marriage with a now ailing husband, and with Isaac’s newly out transgender sibling as her ally, she’s on a crusade to dismantle the patriarchy. But in Taylor Mac’s sly, subversive comedy, we learn that annihilating the past doesn’t always free you from it.

Mac has said “Hir” was inspired and influenced by Sam Shephard’s “Buried Child” and by his own miserable hometown experience in Stockton, California.

We are joined by actors Elizabeth Aspenlieder, John Hadden, and Jack Doyle.

Duckweed Palace, mixed media 2006-2010
Robert Hite

The Albany International Airport is presenting "Above the Fray," its newest exhibition which features sculptures and photographs from Hudson Valley artist, Robert Hite. The show will join Hite’s already existing large-scale sculpture, "Migration House," currently on view at the airport.

Growing up in the rural South during the Civil Rights Movement, Hite explores the relationship between environment and disenfranchisement in his work, and focuses on themes of poverty, functionality, resilience, and community.

He is specifically interested in the meaning of the home, which can provide refuge from the elements and serve as a protective space for aspirations. Hite’s sculptures — described as “hand-made habitations” — are constructed out of found materials like reclaimed wood and metal.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place. Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

The Capital Region Furniture Bank aims for all individuals and families to have the furniture necessary to create a safe and secure environment that contributes to their health and well being. Their mission is to recycle gently-used furniture by collecting it from the community and giving it to individuals and families moving out of homelessness and fleeing domestic violence, as well as countless others struggling to make ends meet. 

We are joined by Liz Hitt, Executive Director of the Homeless and Travelers Aid Society (HATAS), the sponsoring organization of the Capital Region Furniture Bank and by Pete Newkirk is a long-time HATAS board member and volunteer working to develop the “warehouse” which houses the Furniture Bank and the Albany Backpack Food Program.

  As the adage goes: home is where the heart is. This may seem self-explanatory, but none of our close primate cousins have anything like homes. Whether we live in an igloo or in Buckingham Palace, the fact that Homo sapiens create homes is one of the greatest puzzles of our evolution.

In Home: How Habitat Made Us Human, neuroanthropologist John S. Allen marshals evidence from evolutionary anthropology, neuroscience, the study of emotion, and modern sociology to argue that the home is one of the most important cognitive, technological, and cultural products of our species’ evolution. It is because we have homes—relatively secure against whatever horrors lurk outside—that human civilizations have been able to achieve the periods of explosive cultural and creative progress that are our species’ hallmark.

  Francine Jay pioneered the simple living movement with her self-published bestseller, The Joy of Less. 

Her easy-to-follow STREAMLINE method works in any space—from a single drawer to a closet, room, or entire house. What's more, it can be called upon during clutter-inducing life events such as moving, getting married, having kids, or downsizing.

Listener Essay - After The Rain

Jul 28, 2016

  Elisabeth Grace is a retired clinical social worker living in rural Columbia County with two cats, Molly and Silkie. She divides her time between birding, animal welfare, gardening and writing.

After the Rain

Over two days in early June, 2013, I watched my driveway flow downhill and join Albany Turnpike. Soon, a lumbering orange tractor would grind its way up and down the slope scraping displaced earth and stone from the ditches at each side, would divert the runnels of water from the plateau at the top into a gully which had become blocked with fallen branches, rocks and mud, and filled in the 18-inch- deep crevasses which had kept me from driving up to the house for several days.

  Jesse Feiler is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in Apple technologies. He is the creator of Minutes Machine for iPad, the meeting management app and Saranac River Trail app a guide to the Trail that includes location-based updates as well as social media tools.

Today, Jesse joins us to talk about what's new in home automation for smart control and energy savings.

  When Allan Johnson asked his dying father where he wanted his ashes to be placed, his father replied--without hesitation--that it made no difference to him at all.

In his memoir, Not from Here, Johnson embarks on a 2,000-mile journey across the Upper Midwest and Northern Plains to find the place where his father's ashes belonged.

More than a personal narrative, Not from Here illuminates the national silence around unresolved questions of accountability, race, and identity politics, and the dilemma of how to take responsibility for a past we did not create.

  Growing up in a small river town in Illinois, Diane Johnson always dreamed of floating down the Mississippi and off to see the world. Years later, at home in France, a French friend teases her: “Indifference to history—that’s why you Americans seem so naïve and don’t really know where you’re from.”

In her new memoir, Flyover Lives, Johnson explores the Midwest and the family’s history. In digging around, she discovered letters and memoirs written by generations of stalwart pioneer ancestors.

    Hammertown Barn is a popular lifestyle store with locations in Pine Plains and Rhinebeck, NY and Great Barrington, MA. In Love Where You Live: At Home in the Country, design expert Joan Osofsky of Hammertown Barn, shares her in-depth knowledge on stylish modern country living with a collection of creative ideas and real-life tips for making your home warm and welcoming.

Joan and her co-author, Abby Adams, will sign copies of their book at Oblong Books & Music in Millerton, NY tomorrow beginning at 4pm.

  Tina Lincer is a writing in Loudonville, NY.

    NY Times best-selling author and lifestyle expert Bruce Littlefield’s latest book is his most personal to date. In Moving In: Tales of an Unlicensed Marriage, he takes readers on a wild and often hysterical ride through the first year spent fixing up a historic old house with partner (and unwitting handyman) Scott Stewart, one of Manhattan’s top real estate brokers.

    The modern world can get messy. Fortunately, Swiss artist Ursus Wehrli is a man of obsessive order, as he demonstrates in The Art of Clean Up.

Tapping into the desire for organization and the insanity of über-order, Wehrli categorizes everyday objects and situations by color, size, and shape. He arranges alphabet soup into alphabetical order, sorts the night sky by star size, and aligns sunbathers' accouterments—all captured in bright photographs sure to astonish even the pickiest of neat freaks.