higher education

Karen Hitchcock: An Important Step In the Right Direction

Jul 25, 2013

A recent article by Larry Rulison in the Times Union posed the question, “Research Triangle found the right formula -- can we?”  As the article acknowledges, there is no simple answer to this question.   Champions of the concept of university–driven innovation made it happen: creative faculty and administration at North Carolina State University, Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; a committed state government; and, industry leaders who saw the competitive advantage of partnering with faculty at research-intensive universities in areas of research and development relevant to their particular product lines.  

The recent release of a report by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences entitled, “The Heart of the Matter,” has inspired much discussion in the halls of universities and the halls of Congress regarding the importance of the humanities versus the sciences in the education of our nation’s young people. As stated by Jennifer Schuessler in the New York Times, this report, commissioned by a bipartisan group of legislators is “…  intended as a rallying cry against the entrenched idea that the humanities and social sciences are luxuries that employment-minded students can ill afford.” 

5/31/13 - Panel

May 31, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock and College of St. Rose Communications Professor Paul Conti. Ray Graf moderates.

Topics include:
Film Festivals
Ricin Letters to President Obama and NYC Mayor Bloomberg
Universities Show Uneven Efforts in Enrolling Poor
Crazy Weather
A.G. Eric Holder

Herbert London: The University Resistance Movement

May 29, 2013

It was bound to happen. The professoriate has risen in opposition to on-line education. Philosophy professors at San Jose State University said they refuse to use material from an on-line course taught by Harvard professor, Michael Sandel, for fear administrators were angling to cut departmental expenses.

Around the country, thousands upon thousands of young people are graduating from colleges and universities, eager to enter the next phase of their lives – the world of work.  They are looking forward to obtaining employment which will make good use of their particular areas of study; and, in many cases, allow them to begin to pay off the often staggering amounts of debt they have accrued.

    At age 17, Dylan Dethier couldn’t help but think he’d never really done anything with his life. So, two months before his freshman year was set to begin, he deferred admission to Williams College. With the reluctant blessing of his parents, Dylan set out on his idea of the Great American Road Trip: to play a round of golf in each of the lower forty-eight states.

  Lawrence Wittner, Professor of History emeritus at the State University of New York @ Albany, is an award-winning writer and political activist who taught for 43 years on college and university campuses, in the United States and abroad. His latest book is the novel, What's Going On at UAardvark?

Karen Hitchcock: The Meaning of a University

Apr 11, 2013

Earlier this month, David Brooks, the well-known New York Times columnist, published an op-ed entitled, “The Practical University”.  In the context of the rapidly-expanding world of online education, Mr. Brooks is correct when he states that we are forced to ask the question, “What is a university for?” His answer: “…universities are places where young people acquire two sorts of knowledge, technical… and practical.” To date, some 452 individuals have either submitted comments about Mr. Brooks’ answer to that question, or have weighed in themselves on this critical matter.

Clarkson University

Imagine this; two teams of three robots each are pitted against each other in an area to fling projectiles and climb to the top of a steel pyramid.

The Sage Colleges

TROY, N.Y. (AP) — A New York Capital District college plans to establish a new education center in honor of Sandy Hook Elementary School Principal Dawn Hochsprung, who was a doctoral candidate in the college's educational leadership program.

Hochsprung, five other educators and 20 children were killed in the Dec. 14 mass shooting at the school in Newtown, Conn.

Flickr / Nazareth College

Planning for college is the focus of today’s program, and certified educational planner Lynell Engelmyer is in the studio this afternoon to talk more about it.

As many of us have found, securing an acceptance letter to an institution of higher learning is often only half the battle – the other half involves funding the educational experience you hope to have there. We’ll have more on this from Lynell, who helps prepare students for these aspects of the college experience. WAMC's Ray Graf hosts.

Back to School: Why Everyone Deserves A Second Chance at Education is the first book to look at the schools that serve a growing population of “second-chancers,” exploring what higher education—in the fullest sense of the term—can offer our rapidly changing society.

On this edition of Vox Pop, Lynell Engelmyer - certified educational planner with over twenty years of experience in college admissions and financial aid - joins us to talk college financial planning and admissions. WAMC’s Ray Graf hosts.

When some students go to college this fall, they will do so at a campus surrounded by farms and fields. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is working with colleges in rural areas, providing funding to keep them up to date and competitive with larger, urban-based institutions. U.S.D.A. Deputy Undersecretary Doug O’Brien was at Fulton-Montgomery Community College in the town of Johnstown yesterday to dedicate a new residence hall at the school, Raiders Hall. It was built with the help of 11-point three million dollars from the U.S.D.A.

This past weekend I, along with many other extremely fortunate citizens of the Capital Region, experienced a truly memorable event at RPI’s stunning Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center – or EMPAC.   Entitled John Brown’s Body, the event commemorated the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, and was a partnership of the Albany Pro Musica and the New York State Archives Partnership Trust.  The music was sometimes haunting, sometimes a call-to-arms, sometimes ethereal, sometimes dirge-like, sometimes jubilant and, at all times, exquisitely beautiful.

Over the last several months, concerns regarding our nation’s system of higher education have continued to escalate…concerns regarding cost, quality, rigor and, yes, even long-term value.  And, as we all know, the employment opportunities for recent graduates of our institutions of higher education, particularly those who have earned a baccalaureate degree, have decreased substantially, despite the fact that members of the nation’s high technology sector have stated that there are not sufficient numbers of U.S.

In his State of the Union address this past January, President Obama warned the higher education community that, “If you can’t stop tuition from going up, the funding you get from taxpayers will go down.”  Clearly, “affordability” of postsecondary education is a top priority of this administration.  President Obama went on to say that, “We can’t just keep subsidizing skyrocketing tuition, we’ll run out of money.  States need to do their part by making higher education a higher priority in their budgets.   And colleges and universities have to do their part by working to keep costs down."

 

Students are choosing where to go to college. A college education is expensive but too many graduates come out of college without a skill set. What do they need from higher education?

Total student debt in America has hit the $1 trillion mark, exceeding, for the first time, national credit card debt.  Yet at this very moment, the airways and media outlets are alive with stories and opinion pieces regarding the imminent doubling of the interest rate on new Stafford Subsidized Loans to undergraduates.  While in college at least half-time, students holding such need-based, federally guaranteed loans pay no interest; rather, the government pays the interest which accrues during that time.

What does the future hold for health care in the United States? Alumni of the Union Graduate College‘s M.B.A. in health care management will gather tomorrow in Schenectady to discuss the many answers to that question.  

New and innovative models of health care will be on the table including “health home” and “patient navigation”. WAMC’s Brian Shields spoke with Kelli Valenti, a Union graduate, who works with Ellis Medicine in Schenectady, and Dr. John Huppertz, chair of the M.B.A. in health care management at Union Graduate College.

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