heritage | WAMC

heritage

Artwork for "The Thanksgiving Play" presented by WAM Theatre
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WAM Theatre will be presenting the second digital production of their re-imagined fall season beginning later this week, the wickedly funny satire "The Thanksgiving Play" by Larissa FastHorse, directed by Associate Artistic Director Talya Kingston. The production will be available online November 19-22.

The play is fast-paced satire where good intentions collide with absurd assumptions, as a troupe of white Liberal teaching artists scramble to devise a grade school theatre performance that somehow manages to celebrate Turkey Day, while also honoring Native American Heritage Month.

To tell us more, we welcome Director Talya Kingston and actress Molly Parker Myers.

In May 2017, Mayor Mitch Landrieu addressed the people of New Orleans about his decision to take down four Confederate monuments in the city. His speech, which has been heard by millions, sparked a national conversation about the history of our nation and how best to confront our heritage.

In his book, "In The Shadow Of Statues: A White Southerner Confronts History," former Mayor Landrieu discusses the path he took to remove the Confederate monuments and traces his personal relationship to this history, tackling the broader history of slavery, race, and institutional inequality in America.

A new, single volume of history sets out to explore the experiment in government that is the United States. Award-winning Harvard historian Jill Lepore, author of “These Truths: A History of the United States,” looks to explore how we now understand the role of women and people of color in our political heritage, and how to put today’s politics of division in proportion.

Peter Golden
http://www.petergolden.com

Peter Golden is the author of the new novel, "Nothing Is Forgotten," about a young man from New Jersey who travels to Khrushchev’s Russia, where he discovers love and the long-buried secrets of his heritage.

Golden’s previous novels include "Wherever There Is Light" and "Comeback Love." An award-winning journalist, Golden has interviewed many world leaders, including Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Henry Kissinger, Yitzhak Rabin, and Mikhail Gorbachev.

Golden will be joined by first-time novelist Sara Nović for a pair of New York State Writers Institute events on April 17.  The events are cosponsored by UAlbany’s Disability Resource Center, State Education Department’s Office of Cultural Education, and Friends of the New York State Library

Acclaimed writers Madeleine Thien and Peter Ho Davies join us this week to share their stories of Chinese heritage and the human experience. Thien’s latest work is “Do Not Say We Have Nothing” and Peter Ho Davies’ novel is “The Fortunes.”

The Creative Life: A Conversation Series at UAlbany is an initiative of the New York State Writers Institute, UAlbany Performing Arts Center, and University Art Museum, all of which are housed and function on the main campus of the University at Albany. Guests in this inaugural year of the series have included author Joyce Carol Oates and dancer/choreographer Savion Glover who appeared in September and October 2016, respectively.

  In The Black Calhouns, Gail Lumet Buckley—daughter of actress Lena Horne—delves deep into her family history, detailing the experiences of an extraordinary African-American family from Civil War to Civil Rights.

Beginning with her great-great grandfather Moses Calhoun, a house slave who used the rare advantage of his education to become a successful businessman in post-war Atlanta, Buckley follows her family’s two branches: one that stayed in the South, and the other that settled in Brooklyn. 

'Trace' By Lauret Savoy

Dec 14, 2015

  While many geologists focus their inquiry on the Earth, probing contours of the land to reveal how past developments have come to shape the present, Lauret Savoy’s new book, Trace, takes a more personal journey.

Lauret Edith Savoy is a woman of mixed heritage, and a professor of environmental studies and geology at Mount Holyoke College, where she explores the intertwinings of natural and cultural histories. She is a self-described “Earth historian” and in the new book traces her Native, African-, Euro-American ancestry across the United States in the hope of learning what her extended family experienced.

 Our Ideas Matter series allows us to check in with state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we’ll learn about Herencia Latina 2015-16, an nine month program featuring a multitude of films, exhibits, discussions, and festivals examining and celebrating Latino heritage in the Pioneer Valley in Massachusetts. The program is funded by Mass Humanities, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Library Association.

Our guests are Raul Gutierrez, Professor of Spanish at Holyoke Community College in Holyoke, Massachusetts, and Cliff McCarthy, President of the Pioneer Valley History Network.

      We are very happy to continue our weekly feature on the RT, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter. This morning we spotlight Hartford Heritage Project and place-based education with the Connecticut Humanities Council.

Joining us is Dr. Jeffrey Partridge, Chair of the Humanities Department at Captital Community College, in Hartford CT.